Jan Swan Wood

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August 4, 2010
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Selenium poisoning

The Northern plains region is a land of great variety in topography, soil type and grasses. One thing that the states of Montana, South Dakota and Wyoming have in common though is high selenium in the soil, water and plants. The states share the common denominators of 20 inches or less of average rainfall, and alkaline soil with a pH of seven or more.

Selenium is a necessary nutrient in the diet of most animals. It is needed for proper cell membrane function, and serious problems occur when a deficiency occurs. What many refer to as "tying up" in a working horse can be a manifestation of a deficiency, and the symptoms include muscle cramping, sweating, rapid pulse, brown urine (from blood), stiffness, a reluctance to walk and sore to the touch. Other problems from a lack of selenium include: muscle deterioration, compromised immune system, heart failure, reproductive problems (late term abortion, retained placenta), and White Muscle disease in foals. Foals can be weak at birth, or normal at birth and then become unable to stand and nurse. The mare passes selenium through the placenta and milk, so a deficient mare makes a deficient foal.

Supplementing for a selenium deficiency is to be done with caution because overdosing is easy. An inactive horse needs 0.1 mg/kg per day while an active horse or broodmare needs 0.3 mg/kg per day. A deficiency needs to be confirmed with a blood test and supplementation done with a veterinarian's supervision.

An over abundance of selenium, either naturally or by supplementation, can lead to devastating problems for the horse. Initially, too much selenium can lead to the loss of mane and tail hair, hoof issues, weight loss and a dull hair coat. Some horses can come through this without permanent problems if their diet is changed and the problem addressed. Acute selenium poisoning has much longer-reaching effects.

Signs of acute selenium poisoning can include: garlicky breath, muscle tremors, trouble breathing, abnormal gait, abscessed coronary bands, laminitus. Toxicity leads to blindness, paralysis, permanent lameness, abdominal pain, respiratory failure, heart failure, teeth grinding and death.

A horse can overdose on selenium at less than 2 mg/kg per day over their requirements. That is 5 mg per 2.2 lbs./feed; 5 lbs. selenium per 100 tons of feed; or 0.1-0.5 parts per million. That doesn't leave any margin for error.

The Northern plains region is a land of great variety in topography, soil type and grasses. One thing that the states of Montana, South Dakota and Wyoming have in common though is high selenium in the soil, water and plants. The states share the common denominators of 20 inches or less of average rainfall, and alkaline soil with a pH of seven or more.

Selenium is a necessary nutrient in the diet of most animals. It is needed for proper cell membrane function, and serious problems occur when a deficiency occurs. What many refer to as "tying up" in a working horse can be a manifestation of a deficiency, and the symptoms include muscle cramping, sweating, rapid pulse, brown urine (from blood), stiffness, a reluctance to walk and sore to the touch. Other problems from a lack of selenium include: muscle deterioration, compromised immune system, heart failure, reproductive problems (late term abortion, retained placenta), and White Muscle disease in foals. Foals can be weak at birth, or normal at birth and then become unable to stand and nurse. The mare passes selenium through the placenta and milk, so a deficient mare makes a deficient foal.

Supplementing for a selenium deficiency is to be done with caution because overdosing is easy. An inactive horse needs 0.1 mg/kg per day while an active horse or broodmare needs 0.3 mg/kg per day. A deficiency needs to be confirmed with a blood test and supplementation done with a veterinarian's supervision.

An over abundance of selenium, either naturally or by supplementation, can lead to devastating problems for the horse. Initially, too much selenium can lead to the loss of mane and tail hair, hoof issues, weight loss and a dull hair coat. Some horses can come through this without permanent problems if their diet is changed and the problem addressed. Acute selenium poisoning has much longer-reaching effects.

Signs of acute selenium poisoning can include: garlicky breath, muscle tremors, trouble breathing, abnormal gait, abscessed coronary bands, laminitus. Toxicity leads to blindness, paralysis, permanent lameness, abdominal pain, respiratory failure, heart failure, teeth grinding and death.

A horse can overdose on selenium at less than 2 mg/kg per day over their requirements. That is 5 mg per 2.2 lbs./feed; 5 lbs. selenium per 100 tons of feed; or 0.1-0.5 parts per million. That doesn't leave any margin for error.

The Northern plains region is a land of great variety in topography, soil type and grasses. One thing that the states of Montana, South Dakota and Wyoming have in common though is high selenium in the soil, water and plants. The states share the common denominators of 20 inches or less of average rainfall, and alkaline soil with a pH of seven or more.

Selenium is a necessary nutrient in the diet of most animals. It is needed for proper cell membrane function, and serious problems occur when a deficiency occurs. What many refer to as "tying up" in a working horse can be a manifestation of a deficiency, and the symptoms include muscle cramping, sweating, rapid pulse, brown urine (from blood), stiffness, a reluctance to walk and sore to the touch. Other problems from a lack of selenium include: muscle deterioration, compromised immune system, heart failure, reproductive problems (late term abortion, retained placenta), and White Muscle disease in foals. Foals can be weak at birth, or normal at birth and then become unable to stand and nurse. The mare passes selenium through the placenta and milk, so a deficient mare makes a deficient foal.

Supplementing for a selenium deficiency is to be done with caution because overdosing is easy. An inactive horse needs 0.1 mg/kg per day while an active horse or broodmare needs 0.3 mg/kg per day. A deficiency needs to be confirmed with a blood test and supplementation done with a veterinarian's supervision.

An over abundance of selenium, either naturally or by supplementation, can lead to devastating problems for the horse. Initially, too much selenium can lead to the loss of mane and tail hair, hoof issues, weight loss and a dull hair coat. Some horses can come through this without permanent problems if their diet is changed and the problem addressed. Acute selenium poisoning has much longer-reaching effects.

Signs of acute selenium poisoning can include: garlicky breath, muscle tremors, trouble breathing, abnormal gait, abscessed coronary bands, laminitus. Toxicity leads to blindness, paralysis, permanent lameness, abdominal pain, respiratory failure, heart failure, teeth grinding and death.

A horse can overdose on selenium at less than 2 mg/kg per day over their requirements. That is 5 mg per 2.2 lbs./feed; 5 lbs. selenium per 100 tons of feed; or 0.1-0.5 parts per million. That doesn't leave any margin for error.

The Northern plains region is a land of great variety in topography, soil type and grasses. One thing that the states of Montana, South Dakota and Wyoming have in common though is high selenium in the soil, water and plants. The states share the common denominators of 20 inches or less of average rainfall, and alkaline soil with a pH of seven or more.

Selenium is a necessary nutrient in the diet of most animals. It is needed for proper cell membrane function, and serious problems occur when a deficiency occurs. What many refer to as "tying up" in a working horse can be a manifestation of a deficiency, and the symptoms include muscle cramping, sweating, rapid pulse, brown urine (from blood), stiffness, a reluctance to walk and sore to the touch. Other problems from a lack of selenium include: muscle deterioration, compromised immune system, heart failure, reproductive problems (late term abortion, retained placenta), and White Muscle disease in foals. Foals can be weak at birth, or normal at birth and then become unable to stand and nurse. The mare passes selenium through the placenta and milk, so a deficient mare makes a deficient foal.

Supplementing for a selenium deficiency is to be done with caution because overdosing is easy. An inactive horse needs 0.1 mg/kg per day while an active horse or broodmare needs 0.3 mg/kg per day. A deficiency needs to be confirmed with a blood test and supplementation done with a veterinarian's supervision.

An over abundance of selenium, either naturally or by supplementation, can lead to devastating problems for the horse. Initially, too much selenium can lead to the loss of mane and tail hair, hoof issues, weight loss and a dull hair coat. Some horses can come through this without permanent problems if their diet is changed and the problem addressed. Acute selenium poisoning has much longer-reaching effects.

Signs of acute selenium poisoning can include: garlicky breath, muscle tremors, trouble breathing, abnormal gait, abscessed coronary bands, laminitus. Toxicity leads to blindness, paralysis, permanent lameness, abdominal pain, respiratory failure, heart failure, teeth grinding and death.

A horse can overdose on selenium at less than 2 mg/kg per day over their requirements. That is 5 mg per 2.2 lbs./feed; 5 lbs. selenium per 100 tons of feed; or 0.1-0.5 parts per million. That doesn't leave any margin for error.

The Northern plains region is a land of great variety in topography, soil type and grasses. One thing that the states of Montana, South Dakota and Wyoming have in common though is high selenium in the soil, water and plants. The states share the common denominators of 20 inches or less of average rainfall, and alkaline soil with a pH of seven or more.

Selenium is a necessary nutrient in the diet of most animals. It is needed for proper cell membrane function, and serious problems occur when a deficiency occurs. What many refer to as "tying up" in a working horse can be a manifestation of a deficiency, and the symptoms include muscle cramping, sweating, rapid pulse, brown urine (from blood), stiffness, a reluctance to walk and sore to the touch. Other problems from a lack of selenium include: muscle deterioration, compromised immune system, heart failure, reproductive problems (late term abortion, retained placenta), and White Muscle disease in foals. Foals can be weak at birth, or normal at birth and then become unable to stand and nurse. The mare passes selenium through the placenta and milk, so a deficient mare makes a deficient foal.

Supplementing for a selenium deficiency is to be done with caution because overdosing is easy. An inactive horse needs 0.1 mg/kg per day while an active horse or broodmare needs 0.3 mg/kg per day. A deficiency needs to be confirmed with a blood test and supplementation done with a veterinarian's supervision.

An over abundance of selenium, either naturally or by supplementation, can lead to devastating problems for the horse. Initially, too much selenium can lead to the loss of mane and tail hair, hoof issues, weight loss and a dull hair coat. Some horses can come through this without permanent problems if their diet is changed and the problem addressed. Acute selenium poisoning has much longer-reaching effects.

Signs of acute selenium poisoning can include: garlicky breath, muscle tremors, trouble breathing, abnormal gait, abscessed coronary bands, laminitus. Toxicity leads to blindness, paralysis, permanent lameness, abdominal pain, respiratory failure, heart failure, teeth grinding and death.

A horse can overdose on selenium at less than 2 mg/kg per day over their requirements. That is 5 mg per 2.2 lbs./feed; 5 lbs. selenium per 100 tons of feed; or 0.1-0.5 parts per million. That doesn't leave any margin for error.

The Northern plains region is a land of great variety in topography, soil type and grasses. One thing that the states of Montana, South Dakota and Wyoming have in common though is high selenium in the soil, water and plants. The states share the common denominators of 20 inches or less of average rainfall, and alkaline soil with a pH of seven or more.

Selenium is a necessary nutrient in the diet of most animals. It is needed for proper cell membrane function, and serious problems occur when a deficiency occurs. What many refer to as "tying up" in a working horse can be a manifestation of a deficiency, and the symptoms include muscle cramping, sweating, rapid pulse, brown urine (from blood), stiffness, a reluctance to walk and sore to the touch. Other problems from a lack of selenium include: muscle deterioration, compromised immune system, heart failure, reproductive problems (late term abortion, retained placenta), and White Muscle disease in foals. Foals can be weak at birth, or normal at birth and then become unable to stand and nurse. The mare passes selenium through the placenta and milk, so a deficient mare makes a deficient foal.

Supplementing for a selenium deficiency is to be done with caution because overdosing is easy. An inactive horse needs 0.1 mg/kg per day while an active horse or broodmare needs 0.3 mg/kg per day. A deficiency needs to be confirmed with a blood test and supplementation done with a veterinarian's supervision.

An over abundance of selenium, either naturally or by supplementation, can lead to devastating problems for the horse. Initially, too much selenium can lead to the loss of mane and tail hair, hoof issues, weight loss and a dull hair coat. Some horses can come through this without permanent problems if their diet is changed and the problem addressed. Acute selenium poisoning has much longer-reaching effects.

Signs of acute selenium poisoning can include: garlicky breath, muscle tremors, trouble breathing, abnormal gait, abscessed coronary bands, laminitus. Toxicity leads to blindness, paralysis, permanent lameness, abdominal pain, respiratory failure, heart failure, teeth grinding and death.

A horse can overdose on selenium at less than 2 mg/kg per day over their requirements. That is 5 mg per 2.2 lbs./feed; 5 lbs. selenium per 100 tons of feed; or 0.1-0.5 parts per million. That doesn't leave any margin for error.

The Northern plains region is a land of great variety in topography, soil type and grasses. One thing that the states of Montana, South Dakota and Wyoming have in common though is high selenium in the soil, water and plants. The states share the common denominators of 20 inches or less of average rainfall, and alkaline soil with a pH of seven or more.

Selenium is a necessary nutrient in the diet of most animals. It is needed for proper cell membrane function, and serious problems occur when a deficiency occurs. What many refer to as "tying up" in a working horse can be a manifestation of a deficiency, and the symptoms include muscle cramping, sweating, rapid pulse, brown urine (from blood), stiffness, a reluctance to walk and sore to the touch. Other problems from a lack of selenium include: muscle deterioration, compromised immune system, heart failure, reproductive problems (late term abortion, retained placenta), and White Muscle disease in foals. Foals can be weak at birth, or normal at birth and then become unable to stand and nurse. The mare passes selenium through the placenta and milk, so a deficient mare makes a deficient foal.

Supplementing for a selenium deficiency is to be done with caution because overdosing is easy. An inactive horse needs 0.1 mg/kg per day while an active horse or broodmare needs 0.3 mg/kg per day. A deficiency needs to be confirmed with a blood test and supplementation done with a veterinarian's supervision.

An over abundance of selenium, either naturally or by supplementation, can lead to devastating problems for the horse. Initially, too much selenium can lead to the loss of mane and tail hair, hoof issues, weight loss and a dull hair coat. Some horses can come through this without permanent problems if their diet is changed and the problem addressed. Acute selenium poisoning has much longer-reaching effects.

Signs of acute selenium poisoning can include: garlicky breath, muscle tremors, trouble breathing, abnormal gait, abscessed coronary bands, laminitus. Toxicity leads to blindness, paralysis, permanent lameness, abdominal pain, respiratory failure, heart failure, teeth grinding and death.

A horse can overdose on selenium at less than 2 mg/kg per day over their requirements. That is 5 mg per 2.2 lbs./feed; 5 lbs. selenium per 100 tons of feed; or 0.1-0.5 parts per million. That doesn't leave any margin for error.

The Northern plains region is a land of great variety in topography, soil type and grasses. One thing that the states of Montana, South Dakota and Wyoming have in common though is high selenium in the soil, water and plants. The states share the common denominators of 20 inches or less of average rainfall, and alkaline soil with a pH of seven or more.

Selenium is a necessary nutrient in the diet of most animals. It is needed for proper cell membrane function, and serious problems occur when a deficiency occurs. What many refer to as "tying up" in a working horse can be a manifestation of a deficiency, and the symptoms include muscle cramping, sweating, rapid pulse, brown urine (from blood), stiffness, a reluctance to walk and sore to the touch. Other problems from a lack of selenium include: muscle deterioration, compromised immune system, heart failure, reproductive problems (late term abortion, retained placenta), and White Muscle disease in foals. Foals can be weak at birth, or normal at birth and then become unable to stand and nurse. The mare passes selenium through the placenta and milk, so a deficient mare makes a deficient foal.

Supplementing for a selenium deficiency is to be done with caution because overdosing is easy. An inactive horse needs 0.1 mg/kg per day while an active horse or broodmare needs 0.3 mg/kg per day. A deficiency needs to be confirmed with a blood test and supplementation done with a veterinarian's supervision.

An over abundance of selenium, either naturally or by supplementation, can lead to devastating problems for the horse. Initially, too much selenium can lead to the loss of mane and tail hair, hoof issues, weight loss and a dull hair coat. Some horses can come through this without permanent problems if their diet is changed and the problem addressed. Acute selenium poisoning has much longer-reaching effects.

Signs of acute selenium poisoning can include: garlicky breath, muscle tremors, trouble breathing, abnormal gait, abscessed coronary bands, laminitus. Toxicity leads to blindness, paralysis, permanent lameness, abdominal pain, respiratory failure, heart failure, teeth grinding and death.

A horse can overdose on selenium at less than 2 mg/kg per day over their requirements. That is 5 mg per 2.2 lbs./feed; 5 lbs. selenium per 100 tons of feed; or 0.1-0.5 parts per million. That doesn't leave any margin for error.

The Northern plains region is a land of great variety in topography, soil type and grasses. One thing that the states of Montana, South Dakota and Wyoming have in common though is high selenium in the soil, water and plants. The states share the common denominators of 20 inches or less of average rainfall, and alkaline soil with a pH of seven or more.

Selenium is a necessary nutrient in the diet of most animals. It is needed for proper cell membrane function, and serious problems occur when a deficiency occurs. What many refer to as "tying up" in a working horse can be a manifestation of a deficiency, and the symptoms include muscle cramping, sweating, rapid pulse, brown urine (from blood), stiffness, a reluctance to walk and sore to the touch. Other problems from a lack of selenium include: muscle deterioration, compromised immune system, heart failure, reproductive problems (late term abortion, retained placenta), and White Muscle disease in foals. Foals can be weak at birth, or normal at birth and then become unable to stand and nurse. The mare passes selenium through the placenta and milk, so a deficient mare makes a deficient foal.

Supplementing for a selenium deficiency is to be done with caution because overdosing is easy. An inactive horse needs 0.1 mg/kg per day while an active horse or broodmare needs 0.3 mg/kg per day. A deficiency needs to be confirmed with a blood test and supplementation done with a veterinarian's supervision.

An over abundance of selenium, either naturally or by supplementation, can lead to devastating problems for the horse. Initially, too much selenium can lead to the loss of mane and tail hair, hoof issues, weight loss and a dull hair coat. Some horses can come through this without permanent problems if their diet is changed and the problem addressed. Acute selenium poisoning has much longer-reaching effects.

Signs of acute selenium poisoning can include: garlicky breath, muscle tremors, trouble breathing, abnormal gait, abscessed coronary bands, laminitus. Toxicity leads to blindness, paralysis, permanent lameness, abdominal pain, respiratory failure, heart failure, teeth grinding and death.

A horse can overdose on selenium at less than 2 mg/kg per day over their requirements. That is 5 mg per 2.2 lbs./feed; 5 lbs. selenium per 100 tons of feed; or 0.1-0.5 parts per million. That doesn't leave any margin for error.


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Tri-State Livestock News Updated Aug 14, 2012 03:51PM Published Aug 4, 2010 02:26PM Copyright 2010 Tri-State Livestock News. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.