Bill Brewster

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December 23, 2010
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Wolves impact predator damage in many ways

The predator control landscape in Montana is changing in part due to increased wolf populations and limited regulations created by the Endangered Species Act. Evidence of the change can be seen in the way the USDA APHIS Wildlife Service (WS) agency controls other long-time predators, including coyotes, bears and mountain lions.

Predator damage costs in 2010 are up across the board from 2006 WS data in Montana.

In 2010, predator damages from coyotes, wolves, grizzly bears and black bears totaled $1,288,635. The 2006 figure was just $294,083.

John E. Steuber, Montana WS state director, said more personnel time and department funds are spent dealing with the ramifications of an increasing wolf population and range.

Grizzly bear range along the front range has also increased, expanding to the south and east with more than 700 bears estimated. Because grizzly bears are omnivorous, Steuber said, bears don't always kills livestock the way wolves do when present in ranch country.

The predator control landscape in Montana is changing in part due to increased wolf populations and limited regulations created by the Endangered Species Act. Evidence of the change can be seen in the way the USDA APHIS Wildlife Service (WS) agency controls other long-time predators, including coyotes, bears and mountain lions.

Predator damage costs in 2010 are up across the board from 2006 WS data in Montana.

In 2010, predator damages from coyotes, wolves, grizzly bears and black bears totaled $1,288,635. The 2006 figure was just $294,083.

John E. Steuber, Montana WS state director, said more personnel time and department funds are spent dealing with the ramifications of an increasing wolf population and range.

Grizzly bear range along the front range has also increased, expanding to the south and east with more than 700 bears estimated. Because grizzly bears are omnivorous, Steuber said, bears don't always kills livestock the way wolves do when present in ranch country.

The predator control landscape in Montana is changing in part due to increased wolf populations and limited regulations created by the Endangered Species Act. Evidence of the change can be seen in the way the USDA APHIS Wildlife Service (WS) agency controls other long-time predators, including coyotes, bears and mountain lions.

Predator damage costs in 2010 are up across the board from 2006 WS data in Montana.

In 2010, predator damages from coyotes, wolves, grizzly bears and black bears totaled $1,288,635. The 2006 figure was just $294,083.

John E. Steuber, Montana WS state director, said more personnel time and department funds are spent dealing with the ramifications of an increasing wolf population and range.

Grizzly bear range along the front range has also increased, expanding to the south and east with more than 700 bears estimated. Because grizzly bears are omnivorous, Steuber said, bears don't always kills livestock the way wolves do when present in ranch country.


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Tri-State Livestock News Updated Aug 14, 2012 03:56PM Published Dec 23, 2010 04:03PM Copyright 2010 Tri-State Livestock News. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.