Alaina Mousel, Editor

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December 23, 2011
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Feast on Prime Rib this holiday season

Christmas and New Year's celebrations have many home chefs are feeling the pressure of putting together a holiday feast for their family and friends. One of the most daunting centerpiece meats is Prime Rib - but it doesn't have to be thanks to these tips gleaned from Holiday Boot Camp offered at South Dakota State University (SDSU).

Before any feasting begins, take time to ensure food safety. It begins at the grocery store, where consumers should avoid any packages that are ripped or torn. Remember to keep cold products cold by picking up meat just before check out and refrigerating those products upon arriving home.

"Temperature control is the best way to reduce food-borne illness," explained Stacy Scramlin, SDSU meat scientist.

Three safe thawing practices are refrigeration, cold water or microwave methods. "Refrigeration is a slow process, but it's the best way to thaw meat because it is kept in a constant cold temperature," Scramlin said. Be sure to allocate enough time for meat to thaw before meal preparations start if choosing this method.

Do not remove packaging when thawing meat if implementing cold water methods. The key is to avoid raw meat exposure to temperatures above 40 degrees or under 140 degrees. "That's the degree zone where bad bugs, like pathogens, like to grow," she said.

If opting to thaw meat in a microwave, by far the fastest method, plan to cook meat immediately. "I don't recommend this from a quality stand point," Scramlin said as meat can quickly start to cook.

Another food safety tip is to avoid cross-contamination by using different platters and utensils for cooked and raw meat. Anything that comes in contact with raw meat should be washed with hot, soapy water, including hands.

Christmas and New Year's celebrations have many home chefs are feeling the pressure of putting together a holiday feast for their family and friends. One of the most daunting centerpiece meats is Prime Rib - but it doesn't have to be thanks to these tips gleaned from Holiday Boot Camp offered at South Dakota State University (SDSU).

Before any feasting begins, take time to ensure food safety. It begins at the grocery store, where consumers should avoid any packages that are ripped or torn. Remember to keep cold products cold by picking up meat just before check out and refrigerating those products upon arriving home.

"Temperature control is the best way to reduce food-borne illness," explained Stacy Scramlin, SDSU meat scientist.

Three safe thawing practices are refrigeration, cold water or microwave methods. "Refrigeration is a slow process, but it's the best way to thaw meat because it is kept in a constant cold temperature," Scramlin said. Be sure to allocate enough time for meat to thaw before meal preparations start if choosing this method.

Do not remove packaging when thawing meat if implementing cold water methods. The key is to avoid raw meat exposure to temperatures above 40 degrees or under 140 degrees. "That's the degree zone where bad bugs, like pathogens, like to grow," she said.

If opting to thaw meat in a microwave, by far the fastest method, plan to cook meat immediately. "I don't recommend this from a quality stand point," Scramlin said as meat can quickly start to cook.

Another food safety tip is to avoid cross-contamination by using different platters and utensils for cooked and raw meat. Anything that comes in contact with raw meat should be washed with hot, soapy water, including hands.


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Tri-State Livestock News Updated Aug 14, 2012 04:08PM Published Dec 23, 2011 11:45AM Copyright 2011 Tri-State Livestock News. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.