Deep Creek Angus Ranch: Where Quality Runs Generations Deep | TSLN.com

Deep Creek Angus Ranch: Where Quality Runs Generations Deep

Date: Feb. 28, 2017

Location: Philip Livestock Auction

Auctioneer: Doug Dietterle

Reported by: Dan Piroutek and Scott Dirk

Averages:

9 reg. two-year-old Angus Bulls – $6,361

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48 reg. yearling Angus Bulls – $6,151

5 reg. yearling Angus Heifers – $2,520

Deep Creek Angus, owned by TJ and Jeanine Gabriel, and their young family, hosted a big crowd with many repeat buyers on hand. Their ranch is located west of Ft. Pierre and north of Midland, South Dakota.

This herd has done two things to insure their success. First, they have bred an outstanding herd of Angus cattle. I felt that this was easily the best set of bulls, from top to bottom, that they had ever brought to town. Second, they take care of their customers—not only guaranteeing their bulls, but offering service to them all year long.

TJ has bred this herd for maternal strength, and it shows. They want cows that can thrive and survive in the harsh western South Dakota environment. This herd uses many of their home-bred sires, along with proven, problem free AI sires, plus some other purchased sires. They pay special attention to the daughters of these bulls, as they make their way into the cow herd.

The top selling bull of the day was Lot 2, selling for $13,000 to the Larson Family Partnership from Spearfish, South Dakota. He was Deep Creek Gunslinger 633, a son of Deep Creek Doc Holiday 433, and out of a daughter of Pine Creek Timeless 2109 who was a first calf heifer. Born at 74 pounds, he weaned at 815 pounds, and grew to a yearling weight of 1289 pounds. His EPDs were BW 1.4, WW 69, YW 110, and MILK 29. With a15.2 square inch rib eye, he had an IMF ratio of 117, and a 40 cm. scrotal measurement.

Lot 10 sold to repeat buyers, the Labrier Ranch from Murdo, South Dakota, for $11,000. This son of Deep Creek Revolution 417 was out of a daughter of Vermilion X Factor who had a ratio of 105 on four calves. He entered the world at 74 pounds, weaned at 797 pounds, and posted a yearling weight of 1209 pounds. His EPDs were BW -0.3, WW 58, YW 92, and MILK 23. He had a rib eye area of 16.2 square inches to ratio 113.

Another popular bull was Lot 1. With a final bid of $10,500, Shawn Fredericks from Busby, Montana, became the winning bidder for this son of Deep Creek Revolution 417. He was out of a Pathfinder daughter of KCF Bennett Total who had ratioed 117 on 8 calves. With a birth weight of 76 pounds, he weaned at 811 pounds and reached 1380 pounds as a yearling. His EPDs were BW -0.1, WW 61, YW 95, and MILK 28. This calving ease bull had a 42 cm. scrotal measurement, along with a rib eye of 15.4 square inches.

Longtime repeat buyers, Clint and Laura Alleman, from Midland, South Dakota selected Lot 3 at $9500. Here was a son of Deep Creek Doc Holiday, and was out of a daughter of VDAR Really Windy 4097 who had ratioed 109 on two calves. He came from a great cow family. He hit the ground at 75 pounds, weaned at 796 pounds to ratio 111, and grew to a yearling weight of 1280 pounds. His EPDs included BW 0.4, WW 73, YW 113, and MILK 24. He had an IMF ratio of 113 and a 39 cm scrotal measurement.

Another $9500 bull was Lot 20, selling to Ross Kroll from Harrold, South Dakota. He was a son of Deep Creek Revolution 417 and was a recommended heifer bull.

The top selling two-year-old bull was Lot 52 at $9500, selling to L. B. Haase and Sons from Valentine, Nebraska. This son of Connealy Impression 540C was easy moving and thick topped.

The top selling open heifer was Lot 63, Raven Bullock 1693 x Deep Creek Cedar 709, going for $3250 to Ravellette Cattle from Philip, South Dakota. Lehrkamp Livestock, Caputa, South Dakota, paid $3000 for the Lot 66 heifer, Deep Creek Revolution 417 x Sitz Alliance 6595.

Clint and Laura Alleman, Midland, South Dakota, and the Labrier Ranch, Murdo, South Dakota, also consigned commercial open heifers to the Deep Creek Sale.

Give TJ a call to visit the ranch and see the cow herd and next year's crop of bulls.

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