2010 NILE Stock Show experiencing growth | TSLN.com

2010 NILE Stock Show experiencing growth

Courtesy photo

In 1967 when the first NILE Stock Show was held at the Public Auction Yards in Billings, MT, it was the dream of the founders that the NILE would become one of the premier livestock shows in the country. Over the years the NILE has had its ups and downs, much like the agriculture industry it serves. The concept of a livestock show that relies on exhibit entries and sponsorships goes hand in hand with the state of the economy.

The dynamics of the cattle industry has changed since 1967. Transactions that once happened at the sale ring are now happening over the Internet. Seedstock that was once purchased based upon physical appearance and maybe some progeny records are now being bought and sold through a catalog, expected progeny differences (EPDs), embryos, or a straw.

Many questions arise when one takes a deep hard look at the cattle industry and how it relates to a livestock show. Is the best bull in the country the one that won Denver or Louisville? Or is it the bull that had the most semen sales last year?

The prestige of winning in the show ring in 2010 is not what it was in 1967. So where does that leave the legendary livestock shows like the American Royal in Kansas City, the National Western in Denver, San Francisco, Calgary, Arizona National, or the NILE? For many years these shows symbolized the grand showcases for cattle breeders of all sizes to display their cattle and breeding program for the entire world to see.

While the dynamics have changed, ultimately the future of these livestock shows still goes back to the fundamental concept of their purpose: to provide a venue for showcasing livestock. The industry today provides more data for selecting genetics at the fingertips of the producers than ever before. In fact, there has been so much influence on pure data for the last several years that we are seeing great cattle on paper but poor cattle in the pasture or feedlot.

The pendulum is swinging back to producers and commercial cattle operations looking at livestock in a balanced perception of both data and physical appearance and appeal. The livestock shows of yesteryear have the opportunity to reclaim their place in the industry by providing a connection between buyer and seller. It gives both the opportunity to see the cattle and talk face-to-face, as was the case years ago in the industry.

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Since 2005 the NILE Stock Show has seen a 59.1 percent increase in livestock exhibits. For 2010, in light of the changes having to be made due to tornado damage, entries are expected to be level with one year ago.

“Over the years we have made some changes to the layout of the building that allows us to bring in more cattle over the week,” said NILE General Manager Justin Mills. “In addition, we made some schedule changes, like bringing in the Red Angus at the front of the week and Black Angus at the end of the week, that allows us to feature these breeds on their own.”

Exhibitors across the country are also talking about the NILE as of late. They like the facilities and layout of the show and appreciate the desire by the NILE to see the show continue to grow and become a destination for marketing their livestock and genetics.

This year the NILE will feature nearly twenty livestock shows and sales. All shows will be held in the Montana Ford Stores Show Ring located on the south side of the Montana Pavilion, while the sales will be in the Sandstone Building. This includes the NILE Club Calf Show and Sale, which has grown substantially with the addition of a $2,500 cash futurity two years ago. The Club Calf Sale will be held on Tuesday, Oct. 12 at 1 p.m., followed by the Jr. Fed Sale at 5 p.m. For a complete schedule of breed shows and sales, go to: http://www.thenile.org.

In 1967 when the first NILE Stock Show was held at the Public Auction Yards in Billings, MT, it was the dream of the founders that the NILE would become one of the premier livestock shows in the country. Over the years the NILE has had its ups and downs, much like the agriculture industry it serves. The concept of a livestock show that relies on exhibit entries and sponsorships goes hand in hand with the state of the economy.

The dynamics of the cattle industry has changed since 1967. Transactions that once happened at the sale ring are now happening over the Internet. Seedstock that was once purchased based upon physical appearance and maybe some progeny records are now being bought and sold through a catalog, expected progeny differences (EPDs), embryos, or a straw.

Many questions arise when one takes a deep hard look at the cattle industry and how it relates to a livestock show. Is the best bull in the country the one that won Denver or Louisville? Or is it the bull that had the most semen sales last year?

The prestige of winning in the show ring in 2010 is not what it was in 1967. So where does that leave the legendary livestock shows like the American Royal in Kansas City, the National Western in Denver, San Francisco, Calgary, Arizona National, or the NILE? For many years these shows symbolized the grand showcases for cattle breeders of all sizes to display their cattle and breeding program for the entire world to see.

While the dynamics have changed, ultimately the future of these livestock shows still goes back to the fundamental concept of their purpose: to provide a venue for showcasing livestock. The industry today provides more data for selecting genetics at the fingertips of the producers than ever before. In fact, there has been so much influence on pure data for the last several years that we are seeing great cattle on paper but poor cattle in the pasture or feedlot.

The pendulum is swinging back to producers and commercial cattle operations looking at livestock in a balanced perception of both data and physical appearance and appeal. The livestock shows of yesteryear have the opportunity to reclaim their place in the industry by providing a connection between buyer and seller. It gives both the opportunity to see the cattle and talk face-to-face, as was the case years ago in the industry.

Since 2005 the NILE Stock Show has seen a 59.1 percent increase in livestock exhibits. For 2010, in light of the changes having to be made due to tornado damage, entries are expected to be level with one year ago.

“Over the years we have made some changes to the layout of the building that allows us to bring in more cattle over the week,” said NILE General Manager Justin Mills. “In addition, we made some schedule changes, like bringing in the Red Angus at the front of the week and Black Angus at the end of the week, that allows us to feature these breeds on their own.”

Exhibitors across the country are also talking about the NILE as of late. They like the facilities and layout of the show and appreciate the desire by the NILE to see the show continue to grow and become a destination for marketing their livestock and genetics.

This year the NILE will feature nearly twenty livestock shows and sales. All shows will be held in the Montana Ford Stores Show Ring located on the south side of the Montana Pavilion, while the sales will be in the Sandstone Building. This includes the NILE Club Calf Show and Sale, which has grown substantially with the addition of a $2,500 cash futurity two years ago. The Club Calf Sale will be held on Tuesday, Oct. 12 at 1 p.m., followed by the Jr. Fed Sale at 5 p.m. For a complete schedule of breed shows and sales, go to: http://www.thenile.org.

In 1967 when the first NILE Stock Show was held at the Public Auction Yards in Billings, MT, it was the dream of the founders that the NILE would become one of the premier livestock shows in the country. Over the years the NILE has had its ups and downs, much like the agriculture industry it serves. The concept of a livestock show that relies on exhibit entries and sponsorships goes hand in hand with the state of the economy.

The dynamics of the cattle industry has changed since 1967. Transactions that once happened at the sale ring are now happening over the Internet. Seedstock that was once purchased based upon physical appearance and maybe some progeny records are now being bought and sold through a catalog, expected progeny differences (EPDs), embryos, or a straw.

Many questions arise when one takes a deep hard look at the cattle industry and how it relates to a livestock show. Is the best bull in the country the one that won Denver or Louisville? Or is it the bull that had the most semen sales last year?

The prestige of winning in the show ring in 2010 is not what it was in 1967. So where does that leave the legendary livestock shows like the American Royal in Kansas City, the National Western in Denver, San Francisco, Calgary, Arizona National, or the NILE? For many years these shows symbolized the grand showcases for cattle breeders of all sizes to display their cattle and breeding program for the entire world to see.

While the dynamics have changed, ultimately the future of these livestock shows still goes back to the fundamental concept of their purpose: to provide a venue for showcasing livestock. The industry today provides more data for selecting genetics at the fingertips of the producers than ever before. In fact, there has been so much influence on pure data for the last several years that we are seeing great cattle on paper but poor cattle in the pasture or feedlot.

The pendulum is swinging back to producers and commercial cattle operations looking at livestock in a balanced perception of both data and physical appearance and appeal. The livestock shows of yesteryear have the opportunity to reclaim their place in the industry by providing a connection between buyer and seller. It gives both the opportunity to see the cattle and talk face-to-face, as was the case years ago in the industry.

Since 2005 the NILE Stock Show has seen a 59.1 percent increase in livestock exhibits. For 2010, in light of the changes having to be made due to tornado damage, entries are expected to be level with one year ago.

“Over the years we have made some changes to the layout of the building that allows us to bring in more cattle over the week,” said NILE General Manager Justin Mills. “In addition, we made some schedule changes, like bringing in the Red Angus at the front of the week and Black Angus at the end of the week, that allows us to feature these breeds on their own.”

Exhibitors across the country are also talking about the NILE as of late. They like the facilities and layout of the show and appreciate the desire by the NILE to see the show continue to grow and become a destination for marketing their livestock and genetics.

This year the NILE will feature nearly twenty livestock shows and sales. All shows will be held in the Montana Ford Stores Show Ring located on the south side of the Montana Pavilion, while the sales will be in the Sandstone Building. This includes the NILE Club Calf Show and Sale, which has grown substantially with the addition of a $2,500 cash futurity two years ago. The Club Calf Sale will be held on Tuesday, Oct. 12 at 1 p.m., followed by the Jr. Fed Sale at 5 p.m. For a complete schedule of breed shows and sales, go to: http://www.thenile.org.

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