2011 Rural Women in Ag Conference appeals to diverse interests, family business | TSLN.com

2011 Rural Women in Ag Conference appeals to diverse interests, family business

Melissa Burke

The spectacular fall colors of Spearfish Canyon greeted nearly 60 attendees of the annual Rural Women in Ag Conference, held Sept. 29-30 at the Spearfish Canyon Lodge near Lead, SD.

To kick off the conference on Thursday afternoon, three workshops were offered: digital photography basics; getting it printed; and what is new in 2011 taxes. Participants were able to choose two of these.

Professional outdoor photographer Les Voorhis of Spearfish, SD was the instructor for the photography workshop. He led the class outside the conference room and down a short hiking trail to nearby Spearfish Falls, a 150-foot waterfall. Along the trail he answered questions and pointed out possible photo subjects, while explaining ways to best capture these on film. He also described how to use both natural lighting and camera flash to emphasize the different effects they give.

Letitia (Letti) Lister, publisher of the Black Hills Pioneer newspaper, offered advice on how to get media outlets to notice your story. “There isn’t a paper out there that is not interested in the agriculture industry,” Lister said. One of the problems, she explained, is that often a story doesn’t grab her attention right away. She added that sometimes the information given is not clear enough.

Freelance writer Kindra Gordon addressed the class as well. She spoke about how to bridge the gap between people involved in agriculture and those who are not. She suggested starting with local schools by reading an ag-based book to the children. Or use a science or health class as a chance to illustrate an ag-related activity, such as vaccinating animals. Other ways include building a relationship with the media, even hosting a tour of your farm or ranch.

After dinner, sociology professor Dr. Sid Goss of the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology in Rapid City gave an entertaining yet eye-opening discussion called “Generations in the Workplace.” These four generations are often referred to as the Traditionals (born before 1945), the Baby Boomers (born 1945-1963), Generation Y (1964-1980), and the Millenials (1981-2000). Dr. Goss explained that each generation has its own way of looking at things based on what experiences they grew up with. This in turn can manifest itself in the way they deal with one another in the workplace.

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The remainder of the evening was spent enjoying Fun Night. Activities included making aprons from old shirts, massage, jewelry making, and making pin cushions and needle cases.

The spectacular fall colors of Spearfish Canyon greeted nearly 60 attendees of the annual Rural Women in Ag Conference, held Sept. 29-30 at the Spearfish Canyon Lodge near Lead, SD.

To kick off the conference on Thursday afternoon, three workshops were offered: digital photography basics; getting it printed; and what is new in 2011 taxes. Participants were able to choose two of these.

Professional outdoor photographer Les Voorhis of Spearfish, SD was the instructor for the photography workshop. He led the class outside the conference room and down a short hiking trail to nearby Spearfish Falls, a 150-foot waterfall. Along the trail he answered questions and pointed out possible photo subjects, while explaining ways to best capture these on film. He also described how to use both natural lighting and camera flash to emphasize the different effects they give.

Letitia (Letti) Lister, publisher of the Black Hills Pioneer newspaper, offered advice on how to get media outlets to notice your story. “There isn’t a paper out there that is not interested in the agriculture industry,” Lister said. One of the problems, she explained, is that often a story doesn’t grab her attention right away. She added that sometimes the information given is not clear enough.

Freelance writer Kindra Gordon addressed the class as well. She spoke about how to bridge the gap between people involved in agriculture and those who are not. She suggested starting with local schools by reading an ag-based book to the children. Or use a science or health class as a chance to illustrate an ag-related activity, such as vaccinating animals. Other ways include building a relationship with the media, even hosting a tour of your farm or ranch.

After dinner, sociology professor Dr. Sid Goss of the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology in Rapid City gave an entertaining yet eye-opening discussion called “Generations in the Workplace.” These four generations are often referred to as the Traditionals (born before 1945), the Baby Boomers (born 1945-1963), Generation Y (1964-1980), and the Millenials (1981-2000). Dr. Goss explained that each generation has its own way of looking at things based on what experiences they grew up with. This in turn can manifest itself in the way they deal with one another in the workplace.

The remainder of the evening was spent enjoying Fun Night. Activities included making aprons from old shirts, massage, jewelry making, and making pin cushions and needle cases.

The spectacular fall colors of Spearfish Canyon greeted nearly 60 attendees of the annual Rural Women in Ag Conference, held Sept. 29-30 at the Spearfish Canyon Lodge near Lead, SD.

To kick off the conference on Thursday afternoon, three workshops were offered: digital photography basics; getting it printed; and what is new in 2011 taxes. Participants were able to choose two of these.

Professional outdoor photographer Les Voorhis of Spearfish, SD was the instructor for the photography workshop. He led the class outside the conference room and down a short hiking trail to nearby Spearfish Falls, a 150-foot waterfall. Along the trail he answered questions and pointed out possible photo subjects, while explaining ways to best capture these on film. He also described how to use both natural lighting and camera flash to emphasize the different effects they give.

Letitia (Letti) Lister, publisher of the Black Hills Pioneer newspaper, offered advice on how to get media outlets to notice your story. “There isn’t a paper out there that is not interested in the agriculture industry,” Lister said. One of the problems, she explained, is that often a story doesn’t grab her attention right away. She added that sometimes the information given is not clear enough.

Freelance writer Kindra Gordon addressed the class as well. She spoke about how to bridge the gap between people involved in agriculture and those who are not. She suggested starting with local schools by reading an ag-based book to the children. Or use a science or health class as a chance to illustrate an ag-related activity, such as vaccinating animals. Other ways include building a relationship with the media, even hosting a tour of your farm or ranch.

After dinner, sociology professor Dr. Sid Goss of the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology in Rapid City gave an entertaining yet eye-opening discussion called “Generations in the Workplace.” These four generations are often referred to as the Traditionals (born before 1945), the Baby Boomers (born 1945-1963), Generation Y (1964-1980), and the Millenials (1981-2000). Dr. Goss explained that each generation has its own way of looking at things based on what experiences they grew up with. This in turn can manifest itself in the way they deal with one another in the workplace.

The remainder of the evening was spent enjoying Fun Night. Activities included making aprons from old shirts, massage, jewelry making, and making pin cushions and needle cases.

The spectacular fall colors of Spearfish Canyon greeted nearly 60 attendees of the annual Rural Women in Ag Conference, held Sept. 29-30 at the Spearfish Canyon Lodge near Lead, SD.

To kick off the conference on Thursday afternoon, three workshops were offered: digital photography basics; getting it printed; and what is new in 2011 taxes. Participants were able to choose two of these.

Professional outdoor photographer Les Voorhis of Spearfish, SD was the instructor for the photography workshop. He led the class outside the conference room and down a short hiking trail to nearby Spearfish Falls, a 150-foot waterfall. Along the trail he answered questions and pointed out possible photo subjects, while explaining ways to best capture these on film. He also described how to use both natural lighting and camera flash to emphasize the different effects they give.

Letitia (Letti) Lister, publisher of the Black Hills Pioneer newspaper, offered advice on how to get media outlets to notice your story. “There isn’t a paper out there that is not interested in the agriculture industry,” Lister said. One of the problems, she explained, is that often a story doesn’t grab her attention right away. She added that sometimes the information given is not clear enough.

Freelance writer Kindra Gordon addressed the class as well. She spoke about how to bridge the gap between people involved in agriculture and those who are not. She suggested starting with local schools by reading an ag-based book to the children. Or use a science or health class as a chance to illustrate an ag-related activity, such as vaccinating animals. Other ways include building a relationship with the media, even hosting a tour of your farm or ranch.

After dinner, sociology professor Dr. Sid Goss of the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology in Rapid City gave an entertaining yet eye-opening discussion called “Generations in the Workplace.” These four generations are often referred to as the Traditionals (born before 1945), the Baby Boomers (born 1945-1963), Generation Y (1964-1980), and the Millenials (1981-2000). Dr. Goss explained that each generation has its own way of looking at things based on what experiences they grew up with. This in turn can manifest itself in the way they deal with one another in the workplace.

The remainder of the evening was spent enjoying Fun Night. Activities included making aprons from old shirts, massage, jewelry making, and making pin cushions and needle cases.

The spectacular fall colors of Spearfish Canyon greeted nearly 60 attendees of the annual Rural Women in Ag Conference, held Sept. 29-30 at the Spearfish Canyon Lodge near Lead, SD.

To kick off the conference on Thursday afternoon, three workshops were offered: digital photography basics; getting it printed; and what is new in 2011 taxes. Participants were able to choose two of these.

Professional outdoor photographer Les Voorhis of Spearfish, SD was the instructor for the photography workshop. He led the class outside the conference room and down a short hiking trail to nearby Spearfish Falls, a 150-foot waterfall. Along the trail he answered questions and pointed out possible photo subjects, while explaining ways to best capture these on film. He also described how to use both natural lighting and camera flash to emphasize the different effects they give.

Letitia (Letti) Lister, publisher of the Black Hills Pioneer newspaper, offered advice on how to get media outlets to notice your story. “There isn’t a paper out there that is not interested in the agriculture industry,” Lister said. One of the problems, she explained, is that often a story doesn’t grab her attention right away. She added that sometimes the information given is not clear enough.

Freelance writer Kindra Gordon addressed the class as well. She spoke about how to bridge the gap between people involved in agriculture and those who are not. She suggested starting with local schools by reading an ag-based book to the children. Or use a science or health class as a chance to illustrate an ag-related activity, such as vaccinating animals. Other ways include building a relationship with the media, even hosting a tour of your farm or ranch.

After dinner, sociology professor Dr. Sid Goss of the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology in Rapid City gave an entertaining yet eye-opening discussion called “Generations in the Workplace.” These four generations are often referred to as the Traditionals (born before 1945), the Baby Boomers (born 1945-1963), Generation Y (1964-1980), and the Millenials (1981-2000). Dr. Goss explained that each generation has its own way of looking at things based on what experiences they grew up with. This in turn can manifest itself in the way they deal with one another in the workplace.

The remainder of the evening was spent enjoying Fun Night. Activities included making aprons from old shirts, massage, jewelry making, and making pin cushions and needle cases.

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