2011 Western Junior Livestock Show continues tradition | TSLN.com

2011 Western Junior Livestock Show continues tradition

Jackie Fitzgerald

Photo by Jackie FitzgeraldClassmates Jaret Woodward and Kord Rittberger wait outside the barn to show their calves at the 74th annual Western Junior Livestock Show in Rapid City, SD on Friday, Oct. 7.

Many ranching and farming families traveled to Rapid City, SD for the 74th annual Western Junior Livestock Show last week.

Youth from South Dakota, Nebraska and Wyoming had the opportunity to show animals in a wide variety of classes, compete in judging competitions and apply for scholarships during the four-day event.

Western Junior Manager Jackie Maude has overseen the event for the past six years, but her investment in the show runs much deeper. She found her start by showing livestock at the event in 1967. Since then she, along with her family, have been showing, volunteering and judging at the event.

“It’s family tradition,” Maude said. “And a lot of people use this time as a family vacation. Work in the field usually slows down in the fall and it gives people a chance to get together.”

According to Maude the Western Junior Livestock Show is the longest running event to be held at the Rapid City Fairgrounds. She said during World War II the Central States Fair took two years, off but youth continued to show cattle as the Western Junior continued through the conflict.

“There are some people that showing this year that are fifth generation participants,” Maude said. “They are kin to the founding families.”

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While the event is a long-running tradition, it has also changed with the times. This year was the first year goats were included in the livestock show.

“We had 25 entries, which is great,” said Maude. “We only had one dairy goat this year, but it’s a start.”

While walking through the fairgrounds, it was hard not to notice youth glowing with excitement as they prepared their animal for the showring and their enthusiastic smiles when walking away with a champion.

For Kord Rittberger, it was his first experience at the Western Junior Livestock Show. Prepared to win, he stepped into the showring with his competition and good friend Jaret Woodward.

“It’s not always easy going against your friend,” Rittberger said. “We are in the same (show) class and the same class in school and I don’t want to beat my friend, but I really want to be champion.”

According Maude, these type of situations teach youth a lot about leadership skills, work ethic and gives them the chance to apply for scholarships and win a trip to Denver.

“The Western Junior started out as a pen show and a halter show and we want to see it continue to grow,” said Maude. “We don’t want to give it up.”

All of the work needed to get the event up and running is accomplished through volunteer work. Maude and Kenny Snyder, treasurer, are compensated for travel costs associated with the event. Membership cost, along with donations, are the only income that funds awards and operating costs for the event. When the Western Junior started, membership cost only $5; 74 years later, membership cost remains the same.

Many ranching and farming families traveled to Rapid City, SD for the 74th annual Western Junior Livestock Show last week.

Youth from South Dakota, Nebraska and Wyoming had the opportunity to show animals in a wide variety of classes, compete in judging competitions and apply for scholarships during the four-day event.

Western Junior Manager Jackie Maude has overseen the event for the past six years, but her investment in the show runs much deeper. She found her start by showing livestock at the event in 1967. Since then she, along with her family, have been showing, volunteering and judging at the event.

“It’s family tradition,” Maude said. “And a lot of people use this time as a family vacation. Work in the field usually slows down in the fall and it gives people a chance to get together.”

According to Maude the Western Junior Livestock Show is the longest running event to be held at the Rapid City Fairgrounds. She said during World War II the Central States Fair took two years, off but youth continued to show cattle as the Western Junior continued through the conflict.

“There are some people that showing this year that are fifth generation participants,” Maude said. “They are kin to the founding families.”

While the event is a long-running tradition, it has also changed with the times. This year was the first year goats were included in the livestock show.

“We had 25 entries, which is great,” said Maude. “We only had one dairy goat this year, but it’s a start.”

While walking through the fairgrounds, it was hard not to notice youth glowing with excitement as they prepared their animal for the showring and their enthusiastic smiles when walking away with a champion.

For Kord Rittberger, it was his first experience at the Western Junior Livestock Show. Prepared to win, he stepped into the showring with his competition and good friend Jaret Woodward.

“It’s not always easy going against your friend,” Rittberger said. “We are in the same (show) class and the same class in school and I don’t want to beat my friend, but I really want to be champion.”

According Maude, these type of situations teach youth a lot about leadership skills, work ethic and gives them the chance to apply for scholarships and win a trip to Denver.

“The Western Junior started out as a pen show and a halter show and we want to see it continue to grow,” said Maude. “We don’t want to give it up.”

All of the work needed to get the event up and running is accomplished through volunteer work. Maude and Kenny Snyder, treasurer, are compensated for travel costs associated with the event. Membership cost, along with donations, are the only income that funds awards and operating costs for the event. When the Western Junior started, membership cost only $5; 74 years later, membership cost remains the same.

Many ranching and farming families traveled to Rapid City, SD for the 74th annual Western Junior Livestock Show last week.

Youth from South Dakota, Nebraska and Wyoming had the opportunity to show animals in a wide variety of classes, compete in judging competitions and apply for scholarships during the four-day event.

Western Junior Manager Jackie Maude has overseen the event for the past six years, but her investment in the show runs much deeper. She found her start by showing livestock at the event in 1967. Since then she, along with her family, have been showing, volunteering and judging at the event.

“It’s family tradition,” Maude said. “And a lot of people use this time as a family vacation. Work in the field usually slows down in the fall and it gives people a chance to get together.”

According to Maude the Western Junior Livestock Show is the longest running event to be held at the Rapid City Fairgrounds. She said during World War II the Central States Fair took two years, off but youth continued to show cattle as the Western Junior continued through the conflict.

“There are some people that showing this year that are fifth generation participants,” Maude said. “They are kin to the founding families.”

While the event is a long-running tradition, it has also changed with the times. This year was the first year goats were included in the livestock show.

“We had 25 entries, which is great,” said Maude. “We only had one dairy goat this year, but it’s a start.”

While walking through the fairgrounds, it was hard not to notice youth glowing with excitement as they prepared their animal for the showring and their enthusiastic smiles when walking away with a champion.

For Kord Rittberger, it was his first experience at the Western Junior Livestock Show. Prepared to win, he stepped into the showring with his competition and good friend Jaret Woodward.

“It’s not always easy going against your friend,” Rittberger said. “We are in the same (show) class and the same class in school and I don’t want to beat my friend, but I really want to be champion.”

According Maude, these type of situations teach youth a lot about leadership skills, work ethic and gives them the chance to apply for scholarships and win a trip to Denver.

“The Western Junior started out as a pen show and a halter show and we want to see it continue to grow,” said Maude. “We don’t want to give it up.”

All of the work needed to get the event up and running is accomplished through volunteer work. Maude and Kenny Snyder, treasurer, are compensated for travel costs associated with the event. Membership cost, along with donations, are the only income that funds awards and operating costs for the event. When the Western Junior started, membership cost only $5; 74 years later, membership cost remains the same.

Many ranching and farming families traveled to Rapid City, SD for the 74th annual Western Junior Livestock Show last week.

Youth from South Dakota, Nebraska and Wyoming had the opportunity to show animals in a wide variety of classes, compete in judging competitions and apply for scholarships during the four-day event.

Western Junior Manager Jackie Maude has overseen the event for the past six years, but her investment in the show runs much deeper. She found her start by showing livestock at the event in 1967. Since then she, along with her family, have been showing, volunteering and judging at the event.

“It’s family tradition,” Maude said. “And a lot of people use this time as a family vacation. Work in the field usually slows down in the fall and it gives people a chance to get together.”

According to Maude the Western Junior Livestock Show is the longest running event to be held at the Rapid City Fairgrounds. She said during World War II the Central States Fair took two years, off but youth continued to show cattle as the Western Junior continued through the conflict.

“There are some people that showing this year that are fifth generation participants,” Maude said. “They are kin to the founding families.”

While the event is a long-running tradition, it has also changed with the times. This year was the first year goats were included in the livestock show.

“We had 25 entries, which is great,” said Maude. “We only had one dairy goat this year, but it’s a start.”

While walking through the fairgrounds, it was hard not to notice youth glowing with excitement as they prepared their animal for the showring and their enthusiastic smiles when walking away with a champion.

For Kord Rittberger, it was his first experience at the Western Junior Livestock Show. Prepared to win, he stepped into the showring with his competition and good friend Jaret Woodward.

“It’s not always easy going against your friend,” Rittberger said. “We are in the same (show) class and the same class in school and I don’t want to beat my friend, but I really want to be champion.”

According Maude, these type of situations teach youth a lot about leadership skills, work ethic and gives them the chance to apply for scholarships and win a trip to Denver.

“The Western Junior started out as a pen show and a halter show and we want to see it continue to grow,” said Maude. “We don’t want to give it up.”

All of the work needed to get the event up and running is accomplished through volunteer work. Maude and Kenny Snyder, treasurer, are compensated for travel costs associated with the event. Membership cost, along with donations, are the only income that funds awards and operating costs for the event. When the Western Junior started, membership cost only $5; 74 years later, membership cost remains the same.

Many ranching and farming families traveled to Rapid City, SD for the 74th annual Western Junior Livestock Show last week.

Youth from South Dakota, Nebraska and Wyoming had the opportunity to show animals in a wide variety of classes, compete in judging competitions and apply for scholarships during the four-day event.

Western Junior Manager Jackie Maude has overseen the event for the past six years, but her investment in the show runs much deeper. She found her start by showing livestock at the event in 1967. Since then she, along with her family, have been showing, volunteering and judging at the event.

“It’s family tradition,” Maude said. “And a lot of people use this time as a family vacation. Work in the field usually slows down in the fall and it gives people a chance to get together.”

According to Maude the Western Junior Livestock Show is the longest running event to be held at the Rapid City Fairgrounds. She said during World War II the Central States Fair took two years, off but youth continued to show cattle as the Western Junior continued through the conflict.

“There are some people that showing this year that are fifth generation participants,” Maude said. “They are kin to the founding families.”

While the event is a long-running tradition, it has also changed with the times. This year was the first year goats were included in the livestock show.

“We had 25 entries, which is great,” said Maude. “We only had one dairy goat this year, but it’s a start.”

While walking through the fairgrounds, it was hard not to notice youth glowing with excitement as they prepared their animal for the showring and their enthusiastic smiles when walking away with a champion.

For Kord Rittberger, it was his first experience at the Western Junior Livestock Show. Prepared to win, he stepped into the showring with his competition and good friend Jaret Woodward.

“It’s not always easy going against your friend,” Rittberger said. “We are in the same (show) class and the same class in school and I don’t want to beat my friend, but I really want to be champion.”

According Maude, these type of situations teach youth a lot about leadership skills, work ethic and gives them the chance to apply for scholarships and win a trip to Denver.

“The Western Junior started out as a pen show and a halter show and we want to see it continue to grow,” said Maude. “We don’t want to give it up.”

All of the work needed to get the event up and running is accomplished through volunteer work. Maude and Kenny Snyder, treasurer, are compensated for travel costs associated with the event. Membership cost, along with donations, are the only income that funds awards and operating costs for the event. When the Western Junior started, membership cost only $5; 74 years later, membership cost remains the same.

Many ranching and farming families traveled to Rapid City, SD for the 74th annual Western Junior Livestock Show last week.

Youth from South Dakota, Nebraska and Wyoming had the opportunity to show animals in a wide variety of classes, compete in judging competitions and apply for scholarships during the four-day event.

Western Junior Manager Jackie Maude has overseen the event for the past six years, but her investment in the show runs much deeper. She found her start by showing livestock at the event in 1967. Since then she, along with her family, have been showing, volunteering and judging at the event.

“It’s family tradition,” Maude said. “And a lot of people use this time as a family vacation. Work in the field usually slows down in the fall and it gives people a chance to get together.”

According to Maude the Western Junior Livestock Show is the longest running event to be held at the Rapid City Fairgrounds. She said during World War II the Central States Fair took two years, off but youth continued to show cattle as the Western Junior continued through the conflict.

“There are some people that showing this year that are fifth generation participants,” Maude said. “They are kin to the founding families.”

While the event is a long-running tradition, it has also changed with the times. This year was the first year goats were included in the livestock show.

“We had 25 entries, which is great,” said Maude. “We only had one dairy goat this year, but it’s a start.”

While walking through the fairgrounds, it was hard not to notice youth glowing with excitement as they prepared their animal for the showring and their enthusiastic smiles when walking away with a champion.

For Kord Rittberger, it was his first experience at the Western Junior Livestock Show. Prepared to win, he stepped into the showring with his competition and good friend Jaret Woodward.

“It’s not always easy going against your friend,” Rittberger said. “We are in the same (show) class and the same class in school and I don’t want to beat my friend, but I really want to be champion.”

According Maude, these type of situations teach youth a lot about leadership skills, work ethic and gives them the chance to apply for scholarships and win a trip to Denver.

“The Western Junior started out as a pen show and a halter show and we want to see it continue to grow,” said Maude. “We don’t want to give it up.”

All of the work needed to get the event up and running is accomplished through volunteer work. Maude and Kenny Snyder, treasurer, are compensated for travel costs associated with the event. Membership cost, along with donations, are the only income that funds awards and operating costs for the event. When the Western Junior started, membership cost only $5; 74 years later, membership cost remains the same.

Many ranching and farming families traveled to Rapid City, SD for the 74th annual Western Junior Livestock Show last week.

Youth from South Dakota, Nebraska and Wyoming had the opportunity to show animals in a wide variety of classes, compete in judging competitions and apply for scholarships during the four-day event.

Western Junior Manager Jackie Maude has overseen the event for the past six years, but her investment in the show runs much deeper. She found her start by showing livestock at the event in 1967. Since then she, along with her family, have been showing, volunteering and judging at the event.

“It’s family tradition,” Maude said. “And a lot of people use this time as a family vacation. Work in the field usually slows down in the fall and it gives people a chance to get together.”

According to Maude the Western Junior Livestock Show is the longest running event to be held at the Rapid City Fairgrounds. She said during World War II the Central States Fair took two years, off but youth continued to show cattle as the Western Junior continued through the conflict.

“There are some people that showing this year that are fifth generation participants,” Maude said. “They are kin to the founding families.”

While the event is a long-running tradition, it has also changed with the times. This year was the first year goats were included in the livestock show.

“We had 25 entries, which is great,” said Maude. “We only had one dairy goat this year, but it’s a start.”

While walking through the fairgrounds, it was hard not to notice youth glowing with excitement as they prepared their animal for the showring and their enthusiastic smiles when walking away with a champion.

For Kord Rittberger, it was his first experience at the Western Junior Livestock Show. Prepared to win, he stepped into the showring with his competition and good friend Jaret Woodward.

“It’s not always easy going against your friend,” Rittberger said. “We are in the same (show) class and the same class in school and I don’t want to beat my friend, but I really want to be champion.”

According Maude, these type of situations teach youth a lot about leadership skills, work ethic and gives them the chance to apply for scholarships and win a trip to Denver.

“The Western Junior started out as a pen show and a halter show and we want to see it continue to grow,” said Maude. “We don’t want to give it up.”

All of the work needed to get the event up and running is accomplished through volunteer work. Maude and Kenny Snyder, treasurer, are compensated for travel costs associated with the event. Membership cost, along with donations, are the only income that funds awards and operating costs for the event. When the Western Junior started, membership cost only $5; 74 years later, membership cost remains the same.

Many ranching and farming families traveled to Rapid City, SD for the 74th annual Western Junior Livestock Show last week.

Youth from South Dakota, Nebraska and Wyoming had the opportunity to show animals in a wide variety of classes, compete in judging competitions and apply for scholarships during the four-day event.

Western Junior Manager Jackie Maude has overseen the event for the past six years, but her investment in the show runs much deeper. She found her start by showing livestock at the event in 1967. Since then she, along with her family, have been showing, volunteering and judging at the event.

“It’s family tradition,” Maude said. “And a lot of people use this time as a family vacation. Work in the field usually slows down in the fall and it gives people a chance to get together.”

According to Maude the Western Junior Livestock Show is the longest running event to be held at the Rapid City Fairgrounds. She said during World War II the Central States Fair took two years, off but youth continued to show cattle as the Western Junior continued through the conflict.

“There are some people that showing this year that are fifth generation participants,” Maude said. “They are kin to the founding families.”

While the event is a long-running tradition, it has also changed with the times. This year was the first year goats were included in the livestock show.

“We had 25 entries, which is great,” said Maude. “We only had one dairy goat this year, but it’s a start.”

While walking through the fairgrounds, it was hard not to notice youth glowing with excitement as they prepared their animal for the showring and their enthusiastic smiles when walking away with a champion.

For Kord Rittberger, it was his first experience at the Western Junior Livestock Show. Prepared to win, he stepped into the showring with his competition and good friend Jaret Woodward.

“It’s not always easy going against your friend,” Rittberger said. “We are in the same (show) class and the same class in school and I don’t want to beat my friend, but I really want to be champion.”

According Maude, these type of situations teach youth a lot about leadership skills, work ethic and gives them the chance to apply for scholarships and win a trip to Denver.

“The Western Junior started out as a pen show and a halter show and we want to see it continue to grow,” said Maude. “We don’t want to give it up.”

All of the work needed to get the event up and running is accomplished through volunteer work. Maude and Kenny Snyder, treasurer, are compensated for travel costs associated with the event. Membership cost, along with donations, are the only income that funds awards and operating costs for the event. When the Western Junior started, membership cost only $5; 74 years later, membership cost remains the same.

Many ranching and farming families traveled to Rapid City, SD for the 74th annual Western Junior Livestock Show last week.

Youth from South Dakota, Nebraska and Wyoming had the opportunity to show animals in a wide variety of classes, compete in judging competitions and apply for scholarships during the four-day event.

Western Junior Manager Jackie Maude has overseen the event for the past six years, but her investment in the show runs much deeper. She found her start by showing livestock at the event in 1967. Since then she, along with her family, have been showing, volunteering and judging at the event.

“It’s family tradition,” Maude said. “And a lot of people use this time as a family vacation. Work in the field usually slows down in the fall and it gives people a chance to get together.”

According to Maude the Western Junior Livestock Show is the longest running event to be held at the Rapid City Fairgrounds. She said during World War II the Central States Fair took two years, off but youth continued to show cattle as the Western Junior continued through the conflict.

“There are some people that showing this year that are fifth generation participants,” Maude said. “They are kin to the founding families.”

While the event is a long-running tradition, it has also changed with the times. This year was the first year goats were included in the livestock show.

“We had 25 entries, which is great,” said Maude. “We only had one dairy goat this year, but it’s a start.”

While walking through the fairgrounds, it was hard not to notice youth glowing with excitement as they prepared their animal for the showring and their enthusiastic smiles when walking away with a champion.

For Kord Rittberger, it was his first experience at the Western Junior Livestock Show. Prepared to win, he stepped into the showring with his competition and good friend Jaret Woodward.

“It’s not always easy going against your friend,” Rittberger said. “We are in the same (show) class and the same class in school and I don’t want to beat my friend, but I really want to be champion.”

According Maude, these type of situations teach youth a lot about leadership skills, work ethic and gives them the chance to apply for scholarships and win a trip to Denver.

“The Western Junior started out as a pen show and a halter show and we want to see it continue to grow,” said Maude. “We don’t want to give it up.”

All of the work needed to get the event up and running is accomplished through volunteer work. Maude and Kenny Snyder, treasurer, are compensated for travel costs associated with the event. Membership cost, along with donations, are the only income that funds awards and operating costs for the event. When the Western Junior started, membership cost only $5; 74 years later, membership cost remains the same.

Many ranching and farming families traveled to Rapid City, SD for the 74th annual Western Junior Livestock Show last week.

Youth from South Dakota, Nebraska and Wyoming had the opportunity to show animals in a wide variety of classes, compete in judging competitions and apply for scholarships during the four-day event.

Western Junior Manager Jackie Maude has overseen the event for the past six years, but her investment in the show runs much deeper. She found her start by showing livestock at the event in 1967. Since then she, along with her family, have been showing, volunteering and judging at the event.

“It’s family tradition,” Maude said. “And a lot of people use this time as a family vacation. Work in the field usually slows down in the fall and it gives people a chance to get together.”

According to Maude the Western Junior Livestock Show is the longest running event to be held at the Rapid City Fairgrounds. She said during World War II the Central States Fair took two years, off but youth continued to show cattle as the Western Junior continued through the conflict.

“There are some people that showing this year that are fifth generation participants,” Maude said. “They are kin to the founding families.”

While the event is a long-running tradition, it has also changed with the times. This year was the first year goats were included in the livestock show.

“We had 25 entries, which is great,” said Maude. “We only had one dairy goat this year, but it’s a start.”

While walking through the fairgrounds, it was hard not to notice youth glowing with excitement as they prepared their animal for the showring and their enthusiastic smiles when walking away with a champion.

For Kord Rittberger, it was his first experience at the Western Junior Livestock Show. Prepared to win, he stepped into the showring with his competition and good friend Jaret Woodward.

“It’s not always easy going against your friend,” Rittberger said. “We are in the same (show) class and the same class in school and I don’t want to beat my friend, but I really want to be champion.”

According Maude, these type of situations teach youth a lot about leadership skills, work ethic and gives them the chance to apply for scholarships and win a trip to Denver.

“The Western Junior started out as a pen show and a halter show and we want to see it continue to grow,” said Maude. “We don’t want to give it up.”

All of the work needed to get the event up and running is accomplished through volunteer work. Maude and Kenny Snyder, treasurer, are compensated for travel costs associated with the event. Membership cost, along with donations, are the only income that funds awards and operating costs for the event. When the Western Junior started, membership cost only $5; 74 years later, membership cost remains the same.

Many ranching and farming families traveled to Rapid City, SD for the 74th annual Western Junior Livestock Show last week.

Youth from South Dakota, Nebraska and Wyoming had the opportunity to show animals in a wide variety of classes, compete in judging competitions and apply for scholarships during the four-day event.

Western Junior Manager Jackie Maude has overseen the event for the past six years, but her investment in the show runs much deeper. She found her start by showing livestock at the event in 1967. Since then she, along with her family, have been showing, volunteering and judging at the event.

“It’s family tradition,” Maude said. “And a lot of people use this time as a family vacation. Work in the field usually slows down in the fall and it gives people a chance to get together.”

According to Maude the Western Junior Livestock Show is the longest running event to be held at the Rapid City Fairgrounds. She said during World War II the Central States Fair took two years, off but youth continued to show cattle as the Western Junior continued through the conflict.

“There are some people that showing this year that are fifth generation participants,” Maude said. “They are kin to the founding families.”

While the event is a long-running tradition, it has also changed with the times. This year was the first year goats were included in the livestock show.

“We had 25 entries, which is great,” said Maude. “We only had one dairy goat this year, but it’s a start.”

While walking through the fairgrounds, it was hard not to notice youth glowing with excitement as they prepared their animal for the showring and their enthusiastic smiles when walking away with a champion.

For Kord Rittberger, it was his first experience at the Western Junior Livestock Show. Prepared to win, he stepped into the showring with his competition and good friend Jaret Woodward.

“It’s not always easy going against your friend,” Rittberger said. “We are in the same (show) class and the same class in school and I don’t want to beat my friend, but I really want to be champion.”

According Maude, these type of situations teach youth a lot about leadership skills, work ethic and gives them the chance to apply for scholarships and win a trip to Denver.

“The Western Junior started out as a pen show and a halter show and we want to see it continue to grow,” said Maude. “We don’t want to give it up.”

All of the work needed to get the event up and running is accomplished through volunteer work. Maude and Kenny Snyder, treasurer, are compensated for travel costs associated with the event. Membership cost, along with donations, are the only income that funds awards and operating costs for the event. When the Western Junior started, membership cost only $5; 74 years later, membership cost remains the same.

Many ranching and farming families traveled to Rapid City, SD for the 74th annual Western Junior Livestock Show last week.

Youth from South Dakota, Nebraska and Wyoming had the opportunity to show animals in a wide variety of classes, compete in judging competitions and apply for scholarships during the four-day event.

Western Junior Manager Jackie Maude has overseen the event for the past six years, but her investment in the show runs much deeper. She found her start by showing livestock at the event in 1967. Since then she, along with her family, have been showing, volunteering and judging at the event.

“It’s family tradition,” Maude said. “And a lot of people use this time as a family vacation. Work in the field usually slows down in the fall and it gives people a chance to get together.”

According to Maude the Western Junior Livestock Show is the longest running event to be held at the Rapid City Fairgrounds. She said during World War II the Central States Fair took two years, off but youth continued to show cattle as the Western Junior continued through the conflict.

“There are some people that showing this year that are fifth generation participants,” Maude said. “They are kin to the founding families.”

While the event is a long-running tradition, it has also changed with the times. This year was the first year goats were included in the livestock show.

“We had 25 entries, which is great,” said Maude. “We only had one dairy goat this year, but it’s a start.”

While walking through the fairgrounds, it was hard not to notice youth glowing with excitement as they prepared their animal for the showring and their enthusiastic smiles when walking away with a champion.

For Kord Rittberger, it was his first experience at the Western Junior Livestock Show. Prepared to win, he stepped into the showring with his competition and good friend Jaret Woodward.

“It’s not always easy going against your friend,” Rittberger said. “We are in the same (show) class and the same class in school and I don’t want to beat my friend, but I really want to be champion.”

According Maude, these type of situations teach youth a lot about leadership skills, work ethic and gives them the chance to apply for scholarships and win a trip to Denver.

“The Western Junior started out as a pen show and a halter show and we want to see it continue to grow,” said Maude. “We don’t want to give it up.”

All of the work needed to get the event up and running is accomplished through volunteer work. Maude and Kenny Snyder, treasurer, are compensated for travel costs associated with the event. Membership cost, along with donations, are the only income that funds awards and operating costs for the event. When the Western Junior started, membership cost only $5; 74 years later, membership cost remains the same.

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