A viable alternative income | TSLN.com

A viable alternative income

Loretta Sorensen

Photo by Loretta SorensenMartin Kleinschmit of Hartington, NE has found that Lowline Angus thrive on his farm in the northeastern part of the state. They have also proven to provide quality organic meat for his customers who live in several different metropolitan areas around the country.

When Martin Kleinschmit decided to raise organic, grass-fed Lowline cattle, he was looking for a niche market that would add value to the beef he was producing. What he didn’t expect was to find some of that market in metropolitan areas like Chicago and Minneapolis.

While he’s been developing a local customer base for grass-fed beef over the past 15 years, the Hartington, NE farmer says he didn’t recognize this new market until his children brought it to his attention.

“We’ve been raising grass-fed beef for the last 15 years,” Kleinschmit says. “We like it for ourselves and we were selling some of the meat directly to consumers. When we took some to our kids in Chicago a couple of years ago, they said they thought there were other people in the city that would want the meat.”

Since then, the Kleinschmits have been selling their packaged meat to six Chicago families, 10 Minneapolis families and some other metropolitan residents. When they completed certification for organic grass-fed beef recently, their product became even more valuable to consumers.

“One of my sons just started a new job in Minneapolis and he’s sharing information about the meat,” Kleinschmit says. “We expect that we’ll have some new customers when we make our next trip there.”

When Martin Kleinschmit decided to raise organic, grass-fed Lowline cattle, he was looking for a niche market that would add value to the beef he was producing. What he didn’t expect was to find some of that market in metropolitan areas like Chicago and Minneapolis.

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While he’s been developing a local customer base for grass-fed beef over the past 15 years, the Hartington, NE farmer says he didn’t recognize this new market until his children brought it to his attention.

“We’ve been raising grass-fed beef for the last 15 years,” Kleinschmit says. “We like it for ourselves and we were selling some of the meat directly to consumers. When we took some to our kids in Chicago a couple of years ago, they said they thought there were other people in the city that would want the meat.”

Since then, the Kleinschmits have been selling their packaged meat to six Chicago families, 10 Minneapolis families and some other metropolitan residents. When they completed certification for organic grass-fed beef recently, their product became even more valuable to consumers.

“One of my sons just started a new job in Minneapolis and he’s sharing information about the meat,” Kleinschmit says. “We expect that we’ll have some new customers when we make our next trip there.”

More information about the Kleinschmit’s and their beef is available at http://www.kleinbeef.com.

This article appears in the 2009 Winter Cattle Journal, a publication of Tri-State Livestock News.

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