Addressing consumer concerns about beef | TSLN.com

Addressing consumer concerns about beef

Amanda Nolz

Keith Underwood, Ph.D., Assistant Professor in the Animal and Range Sciences Department at SDSU

The evening news aired as usual on KELOLAND on May 3, 2010, as anchors shared the top stories of the day and the weather outlook for the following day. One of the lead stories of the evening, as reported by Katie Janssen, was called, “The School Lunch Debate,” and it discussed a hot topic in food production today, ammonia-treated beef.

There is a growing number of consumers who are concerned about where their food comes from and how it’s produced. Because of Hollywood’s depiction of animal agriculture, they worry about the environment, the care of animals and the healthfulness and safety of the foods they eat. And, when it involves children in schools, the fear factor raises significantly.

The evening news aired as usual on KELOLAND on May 3, 2010, as anchors shared the top stories of the day and the weather outlook for the following day. One of the lead stories of the evening, as reported by Katie Janssen, was called, “The School Lunch Debate,” and it discussed a hot topic in food production today, ammonia-treated beef.

There is a growing number of consumers who are concerned about where their food comes from and how it’s produced. Because of Hollywood’s depiction of animal agriculture, they worry about the environment, the care of animals and the healthfulness and safety of the foods they eat. And, when it involves children in schools, the fear factor raises significantly.

The evening news aired as usual on KELOLAND on May 3, 2010, as anchors shared the top stories of the day and the weather outlook for the following day. One of the lead stories of the evening, as reported by Katie Janssen, was called, “The School Lunch Debate,” and it discussed a hot topic in food production today, ammonia-treated beef.

There is a growing number of consumers who are concerned about where their food comes from and how it’s produced. Because of Hollywood’s depiction of animal agriculture, they worry about the environment, the care of animals and the healthfulness and safety of the foods they eat. And, when it involves children in schools, the fear factor raises significantly.

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