Advantages of corn residue to reduce costs | TSLN.com

Advantages of corn residue to reduce costs

NDSU Animal and Range Sciences Department

In my June column, I discussed the continued inflationary pressures on cow costs. Feed and grazing costs top the list in terms of the major cost categories in cow calf production. Grazing crop residues is one way to help you reduce costs and improve your bottom line.

In my part of the world, the Corn Belt has been moving north and west every year. The advent of varieties which are better adapted to cooler summers and shorter growing seasons, along with GMO traits for herbicide resistance, have certainly made this possible. We now have farmers growing corn for grain in almost every county in North Dakota. Growing corn for grain was unheard of 10 years ago in all but about 10 counties in southeast North Dakota.

What does all this have to do with cow calf production? As corn production stretches north and west, so does the opportunity to graze corn residues in the fall and winter.

In my June column, I discussed the continued inflationary pressures on cow costs. Feed and grazing costs top the list in terms of the major cost categories in cow calf production. Grazing crop residues is one way to help you reduce costs and improve your bottom line.

In my part of the world, the Corn Belt has been moving north and west every year. The advent of varieties which are better adapted to cooler summers and shorter growing seasons, along with GMO traits for herbicide resistance, have certainly made this possible. We now have farmers growing corn for grain in almost every county in North Dakota. Growing corn for grain was unheard of 10 years ago in all but about 10 counties in southeast North Dakota.

What does all this have to do with cow calf production? As corn production stretches north and west, so does the opportunity to graze corn residues in the fall and winter.

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In my June column, I discussed the continued inflationary pressures on cow costs. Feed and grazing costs top the list in terms of the major cost categories in cow calf production. Grazing crop residues is one way to help you reduce costs and improve your bottom line.

In my part of the world, the Corn Belt has been moving north and west every year. The advent of varieties which are better adapted to cooler summers and shorter growing seasons, along with GMO traits for herbicide resistance, have certainly made this possible. We now have farmers growing corn for grain in almost every county in North Dakota. Growing corn for grain was unheard of 10 years ago in all but about 10 counties in southeast North Dakota.

What does all this have to do with cow calf production? As corn production stretches north and west, so does the opportunity to graze corn residues in the fall and winter.

In my June column, I discussed the continued inflationary pressures on cow costs. Feed and grazing costs top the list in terms of the major cost categories in cow calf production. Grazing crop residues is one way to help you reduce costs and improve your bottom line.

In my part of the world, the Corn Belt has been moving north and west every year. The advent of varieties which are better adapted to cooler summers and shorter growing seasons, along with GMO traits for herbicide resistance, have certainly made this possible. We now have farmers growing corn for grain in almost every county in North Dakota. Growing corn for grain was unheard of 10 years ago in all but about 10 counties in southeast North Dakota.

What does all this have to do with cow calf production? As corn production stretches north and west, so does the opportunity to graze corn residues in the fall and winter.

In my June column, I discussed the continued inflationary pressures on cow costs. Feed and grazing costs top the list in terms of the major cost categories in cow calf production. Grazing crop residues is one way to help you reduce costs and improve your bottom line.

In my part of the world, the Corn Belt has been moving north and west every year. The advent of varieties which are better adapted to cooler summers and shorter growing seasons, along with GMO traits for herbicide resistance, have certainly made this possible. We now have farmers growing corn for grain in almost every county in North Dakota. Growing corn for grain was unheard of 10 years ago in all but about 10 counties in southeast North Dakota.

What does all this have to do with cow calf production? As corn production stretches north and west, so does the opportunity to graze corn residues in the fall and winter.

In my June column, I discussed the continued inflationary pressures on cow costs. Feed and grazing costs top the list in terms of the major cost categories in cow calf production. Grazing crop residues is one way to help you reduce costs and improve your bottom line.

In my part of the world, the Corn Belt has been moving north and west every year. The advent of varieties which are better adapted to cooler summers and shorter growing seasons, along with GMO traits for herbicide resistance, have certainly made this possible. We now have farmers growing corn for grain in almost every county in North Dakota. Growing corn for grain was unheard of 10 years ago in all but about 10 counties in southeast North Dakota.

What does all this have to do with cow calf production? As corn production stretches north and west, so does the opportunity to graze corn residues in the fall and winter.

In my June column, I discussed the continued inflationary pressures on cow costs. Feed and grazing costs top the list in terms of the major cost categories in cow calf production. Grazing crop residues is one way to help you reduce costs and improve your bottom line.

In my part of the world, the Corn Belt has been moving north and west every year. The advent of varieties which are better adapted to cooler summers and shorter growing seasons, along with GMO traits for herbicide resistance, have certainly made this possible. We now have farmers growing corn for grain in almost every county in North Dakota. Growing corn for grain was unheard of 10 years ago in all but about 10 counties in southeast North Dakota.

What does all this have to do with cow calf production? As corn production stretches north and west, so does the opportunity to graze corn residues in the fall and winter.

In my June column, I discussed the continued inflationary pressures on cow costs. Feed and grazing costs top the list in terms of the major cost categories in cow calf production. Grazing crop residues is one way to help you reduce costs and improve your bottom line.

In my part of the world, the Corn Belt has been moving north and west every year. The advent of varieties which are better adapted to cooler summers and shorter growing seasons, along with GMO traits for herbicide resistance, have certainly made this possible. We now have farmers growing corn for grain in almost every county in North Dakota. Growing corn for grain was unheard of 10 years ago in all but about 10 counties in southeast North Dakota.

What does all this have to do with cow calf production? As corn production stretches north and west, so does the opportunity to graze corn residues in the fall and winter.

In my June column, I discussed the continued inflationary pressures on cow costs. Feed and grazing costs top the list in terms of the major cost categories in cow calf production. Grazing crop residues is one way to help you reduce costs and improve your bottom line.

In my part of the world, the Corn Belt has been moving north and west every year. The advent of varieties which are better adapted to cooler summers and shorter growing seasons, along with GMO traits for herbicide resistance, have certainly made this possible. We now have farmers growing corn for grain in almost every county in North Dakota. Growing corn for grain was unheard of 10 years ago in all but about 10 counties in southeast North Dakota.

What does all this have to do with cow calf production? As corn production stretches north and west, so does the opportunity to graze corn residues in the fall and winter.

In my June column, I discussed the continued inflationary pressures on cow costs. Feed and grazing costs top the list in terms of the major cost categories in cow calf production. Grazing crop residues is one way to help you reduce costs and improve your bottom line.

In my part of the world, the Corn Belt has been moving north and west every year. The advent of varieties which are better adapted to cooler summers and shorter growing seasons, along with GMO traits for herbicide resistance, have certainly made this possible. We now have farmers growing corn for grain in almost every county in North Dakota. Growing corn for grain was unheard of 10 years ago in all but about 10 counties in southeast North Dakota.

What does all this have to do with cow calf production? As corn production stretches north and west, so does the opportunity to graze corn residues in the fall and winter.

email greg lardy at gregory.lardy@ndsu.edu

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