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Advocates for Agriculture set pace at Cattlemen’s Convention

TSLN photo by Doug HoganTroy and Stacy Hadrick, Advocates for Agriculture, of Vale, SD.

A heavy snowfall and icy roads couldn’t keep cattlemen away from the South Dakota Cattlemen’s Association’s Annual Tradeshow and Convention in Huron, SD on Dec. 3-4. Producers hurried to get chores done early, so they could get on the road and listen to the convention’s first speakers: Troy and Stacy Hadrick of Vale, SD.

This young ranching couple certainly set the pace at the convention. With their intense energy and upbeat speaking style, the Hadricks discussed animal rights activists’ activities and how to combat them. They also pointed out who the real enemies in this fight are: farmers and ranchers.

“Only two percent of us in this country are directly involved in production agriculture,” said Troy to the crowd of cattlemen. “Each cattle producer is responsible for feeding 144 people each year, and that’s quite the accomplishment. The real problem is our lack of communication with our consumers. What have you done to promote agriculture lately? What are you going to do now? We have to take action before it’s too late.”

A heavy snowfall and icy roads couldn’t keep cattlemen away from the South Dakota Cattlemen’s Association’s Annual Tradeshow and Convention in Huron, SD on Dec. 3-4. Producers hurried to get chores done early, so they could get on the road and listen to the convention’s first speakers: Troy and Stacy Hadrick of Vale, SD.

This young ranching couple certainly set the pace at the convention. With their intense energy and upbeat speaking style, the Hadricks discussed animal rights activists’ activities and how to combat them. They also pointed out who the real enemies in this fight are: farmers and ranchers.

“Only two percent of us in this country are directly involved in production agriculture,” said Troy to the crowd of cattlemen. “Each cattle producer is responsible for feeding 144 people each year, and that’s quite the accomplishment. The real problem is our lack of communication with our consumers. What have you done to promote agriculture lately? What are you going to do now? We have to take action before it’s too late.”

A heavy snowfall and icy roads couldn’t keep cattlemen away from the South Dakota Cattlemen’s Association’s Annual Tradeshow and Convention in Huron, SD on Dec. 3-4. Producers hurried to get chores done early, so they could get on the road and listen to the convention’s first speakers: Troy and Stacy Hadrick of Vale, SD.

This young ranching couple certainly set the pace at the convention. With their intense energy and upbeat speaking style, the Hadricks discussed animal rights activists’ activities and how to combat them. They also pointed out who the real enemies in this fight are: farmers and ranchers.

“Only two percent of us in this country are directly involved in production agriculture,” said Troy to the crowd of cattlemen. “Each cattle producer is responsible for feeding 144 people each year, and that’s quite the accomplishment. The real problem is our lack of communication with our consumers. What have you done to promote agriculture lately? What are you going to do now? We have to take action before it’s too late.”