Ag Summit discusses top issues | TSLN.com

Ag Summit discusses top issues

Aaron Nelson

TSLN photos by Aaron NelsonOver 200 guests filled the Central Meade County Community Center in Union Center, SD on Aug. 16 for Ag Summit 2008.

UNION CENTER, SD – On Aug. 16, over 200 agriculture producers filled the Central Meade County Community Center in Union Center for Ag Summit 2008. A variety of topics were discussed including property tax, COOL, animal identification and brand inspection. A panel of ag leaders representing the state’s Animal Industry Board, Farm Bureau, Farmers Union, Stockgrowers Association and Cattlemen’s Association were on hand.

The morning began with a property tax update with Kirk Chaffee, Meade County Director of Equalization and Michael Kenyon, SD Department of Revenue. Kenyon shared a state map showing the 2007 dollars per acre for all of South Dakota’s counties. The data showed a large gap in pasture prices from county to county, stretching from $951.21 per acre in Moody County to $53.79 in Corson County. Crop prices varied from $1,708.12 per acre in Lincoln County to $130.40 in Corson County.

“We are determined to evaluate land based on its productivity,” said Kenyon. “We’re hoping this new system won’t have the big discrepancies between counties. There will be some big changes for some counties.”

Kenyon added that the first impact on taxes paid with this new system will be fully implemented in 2011.

“We supported a tax based on productivity rather than marketability,” said Chaffee. “This will still have its roots in the soil survey system.”

“Policy plans should have always been based on what is produced and we’re glad to see this,” said Scott VanderWal, president of the SD Farm Bureau. “The old system was broken and we were headed for a train wreck. This will prevent a train wreck.”

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Following the property tax update, Bill Even, SD Secretary of Agriculture, shared his State of Agriculture Address. Even said the state of ag in South Dakota is good and was thankful for the adequate rainfall the state received this spring and summer. His talk shifted to some concerns, however, including the state’s change in demographics and special interest groups.

“The number one change in South Dakota ag is its demographics change,” said Even. “A large number of people are moving to the Black Hills and I-29 corridor. The rural majority in South Dakota’s legislature is coming to an end.”

With this shift, Even stressed the importance of ag producers to stay involved and in contact with the state’s legislative leaders, especially as special interest groups continue to push their agendas. Even said anti-animal agriculture groups are pushing hard to mislead legislators as well as consumers. With an increasing number of SD legislators hailing from cities, ranchers and farmers will have to be more active than ever to not let special interest groups influence those officials, and in turn, state government.

UNION CENTER, SD – On Aug. 16, over 200 agriculture producers filled the Central Meade County Community Center in Union Center for Ag Summit 2008. A variety of topics were discussed including property tax, COOL, animal identification and brand inspection. A panel of ag leaders representing the state’s Animal Industry Board, Farm Bureau, Farmers Union, Stockgrowers Association and Cattlemen’s Association were on hand.

The morning began with a property tax update with Kirk Chaffee, Meade County Director of Equalization and Michael Kenyon, SD Department of Revenue. Kenyon shared a state map showing the 2007 dollars per acre for all of South Dakota’s counties. The data showed a large gap in pasture prices from county to county, stretching from $951.21 per acre in Moody County to $53.79 in Corson County. Crop prices varied from $1,708.12 per acre in Lincoln County to $130.40 in Corson County.

“We are determined to evaluate land based on its productivity,” said Kenyon. “We’re hoping this new system won’t have the big discrepancies between counties. There will be some big changes for some counties.”

Kenyon added that the first impact on taxes paid with this new system will be fully implemented in 2011.

“We supported a tax based on productivity rather than marketability,” said Chaffee. “This will still have its roots in the soil survey system.”

“Policy plans should have always been based on what is produced and we’re glad to see this,” said Scott VanderWal, president of the SD Farm Bureau. “The old system was broken and we were headed for a train wreck. This will prevent a train wreck.”

Following the property tax update, Bill Even, SD Secretary of Agriculture, shared his State of Agriculture Address. Even said the state of ag in South Dakota is good and was thankful for the adequate rainfall the state received this spring and summer. His talk shifted to some concerns, however, including the state’s change in demographics and special interest groups.

“The number one change in South Dakota ag is its demographics change,” said Even. “A large number of people are moving to the Black Hills and I-29 corridor. The rural majority in South Dakota’s legislature is coming to an end.”

With this shift, Even stressed the importance of ag producers to stay involved and in contact with the state’s legislative leaders, especially as special interest groups continue to push their agendas. Even said anti-animal agriculture groups are pushing hard to mislead legislators as well as consumers. With an increasing number of SD legislators hailing from cities, ranchers and farmers will have to be more active than ever to not let special interest groups influence those officials, and in turn, state government.

UNION CENTER, SD – On Aug. 16, over 200 agriculture producers filled the Central Meade County Community Center in Union Center for Ag Summit 2008. A variety of topics were discussed including property tax, COOL, animal identification and brand inspection. A panel of ag leaders representing the state’s Animal Industry Board, Farm Bureau, Farmers Union, Stockgrowers Association and Cattlemen’s Association were on hand.

The morning began with a property tax update with Kirk Chaffee, Meade County Director of Equalization and Michael Kenyon, SD Department of Revenue. Kenyon shared a state map showing the 2007 dollars per acre for all of South Dakota’s counties. The data showed a large gap in pasture prices from county to county, stretching from $951.21 per acre in Moody County to $53.79 in Corson County. Crop prices varied from $1,708.12 per acre in Lincoln County to $130.40 in Corson County.

“We are determined to evaluate land based on its productivity,” said Kenyon. “We’re hoping this new system won’t have the big discrepancies between counties. There will be some big changes for some counties.”

Kenyon added that the first impact on taxes paid with this new system will be fully implemented in 2011.

“We supported a tax based on productivity rather than marketability,” said Chaffee. “This will still have its roots in the soil survey system.”

“Policy plans should have always been based on what is produced and we’re glad to see this,” said Scott VanderWal, president of the SD Farm Bureau. “The old system was broken and we were headed for a train wreck. This will prevent a train wreck.”

Following the property tax update, Bill Even, SD Secretary of Agriculture, shared his State of Agriculture Address. Even said the state of ag in South Dakota is good and was thankful for the adequate rainfall the state received this spring and summer. His talk shifted to some concerns, however, including the state’s change in demographics and special interest groups.

“The number one change in South Dakota ag is its demographics change,” said Even. “A large number of people are moving to the Black Hills and I-29 corridor. The rural majority in South Dakota’s legislature is coming to an end.”

With this shift, Even stressed the importance of ag producers to stay involved and in contact with the state’s legislative leaders, especially as special interest groups continue to push their agendas. Even said anti-animal agriculture groups are pushing hard to mislead legislators as well as consumers. With an increasing number of SD legislators hailing from cities, ranchers and farmers will have to be more active than ever to not let special interest groups influence those officials, and in turn, state government.

UNION CENTER, SD – On Aug. 16, over 200 agriculture producers filled the Central Meade County Community Center in Union Center for Ag Summit 2008. A variety of topics were discussed including property tax, COOL, animal identification and brand inspection. A panel of ag leaders representing the state’s Animal Industry Board, Farm Bureau, Farmers Union, Stockgrowers Association and Cattlemen’s Association were on hand.

The morning began with a property tax update with Kirk Chaffee, Meade County Director of Equalization and Michael Kenyon, SD Department of Revenue. Kenyon shared a state map showing the 2007 dollars per acre for all of South Dakota’s counties. The data showed a large gap in pasture prices from county to county, stretching from $951.21 per acre in Moody County to $53.79 in Corson County. Crop prices varied from $1,708.12 per acre in Lincoln County to $130.40 in Corson County.

“We are determined to evaluate land based on its productivity,” said Kenyon. “We’re hoping this new system won’t have the big discrepancies between counties. There will be some big changes for some counties.”

Kenyon added that the first impact on taxes paid with this new system will be fully implemented in 2011.

“We supported a tax based on productivity rather than marketability,” said Chaffee. “This will still have its roots in the soil survey system.”

“Policy plans should have always been based on what is produced and we’re glad to see this,” said Scott VanderWal, president of the SD Farm Bureau. “The old system was broken and we were headed for a train wreck. This will prevent a train wreck.”

Following the property tax update, Bill Even, SD Secretary of Agriculture, shared his State of Agriculture Address. Even said the state of ag in South Dakota is good and was thankful for the adequate rainfall the state received this spring and summer. His talk shifted to some concerns, however, including the state’s change in demographics and special interest groups.

“The number one change in South Dakota ag is its demographics change,” said Even. “A large number of people are moving to the Black Hills and I-29 corridor. The rural majority in South Dakota’s legislature is coming to an end.”

With this shift, Even stressed the importance of ag producers to stay involved and in contact with the state’s legislative leaders, especially as special interest groups continue to push their agendas. Even said anti-animal agriculture groups are pushing hard to mislead legislators as well as consumers. With an increasing number of SD legislators hailing from cities, ranchers and farmers will have to be more active than ever to not let special interest groups influence those officials, and in turn, state government.

UNION CENTER, SD – On Aug. 16, over 200 agriculture producers filled the Central Meade County Community Center in Union Center for Ag Summit 2008. A variety of topics were discussed including property tax, COOL, animal identification and brand inspection. A panel of ag leaders representing the state’s Animal Industry Board, Farm Bureau, Farmers Union, Stockgrowers Association and Cattlemen’s Association were on hand.

The morning began with a property tax update with Kirk Chaffee, Meade County Director of Equalization and Michael Kenyon, SD Department of Revenue. Kenyon shared a state map showing the 2007 dollars per acre for all of South Dakota’s counties. The data showed a large gap in pasture prices from county to county, stretching from $951.21 per acre in Moody County to $53.79 in Corson County. Crop prices varied from $1,708.12 per acre in Lincoln County to $130.40 in Corson County.

“We are determined to evaluate land based on its productivity,” said Kenyon. “We’re hoping this new system won’t have the big discrepancies between counties. There will be some big changes for some counties.”

Kenyon added that the first impact on taxes paid with this new system will be fully implemented in 2011.

“We supported a tax based on productivity rather than marketability,” said Chaffee. “This will still have its roots in the soil survey system.”

“Policy plans should have always been based on what is produced and we’re glad to see this,” said Scott VanderWal, president of the SD Farm Bureau. “The old system was broken and we were headed for a train wreck. This will prevent a train wreck.”

Following the property tax update, Bill Even, SD Secretary of Agriculture, shared his State of Agriculture Address. Even said the state of ag in South Dakota is good and was thankful for the adequate rainfall the state received this spring and summer. His talk shifted to some concerns, however, including the state’s change in demographics and special interest groups.

“The number one change in South Dakota ag is its demographics change,” said Even. “A large number of people are moving to the Black Hills and I-29 corridor. The rural majority in South Dakota’s legislature is coming to an end.”

With this shift, Even stressed the importance of ag producers to stay involved and in contact with the state’s legislative leaders, especially as special interest groups continue to push their agendas. Even said anti-animal agriculture groups are pushing hard to mislead legislators as well as consumers. With an increasing number of SD legislators hailing from cities, ranchers and farmers will have to be more active than ever to not let special interest groups influence those officials, and in turn, state government.

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