Agriculture students reach out to Vegan Outreach | TSLN.com

Agriculture students reach out to Vegan Outreach

Amanda Nolz

Photo by Vanessa PoochWyatt DeJong and Colton Buus speak with a student who stopped and asked questions about Tuesday's anti-meat activist. The booth was set up outside the University Student Union. DeJong and Buus are both sophomores at South Dakota State University and members in the Block and Bridle Club on campus.

Every spring, activists dust off their brochures and park themselves in front of the Student Union on the campus of South Dakota State University (SDSU). While they mostly go unnoticed as they attempt to pass out their misinformation depicting farmers and ranchers in a poor light, once in awhile, they will catch the interest of students and get them thinking about where their food comes from.

The activist from Vegan Outreach passing out brochures on campus on April 27, 2010 probably had no idea that the only young people he would be talking to on campus that day were agriculture students with a bone to pick. When Wyatt DeJong received a text message about an animal rights activist on campus, he knew he had to take action. The word quickly spread in the agriculture community via texting and Facebook, and a call to action was set in place: initiate a conversation with the politician from Vegan Outreach. DeJong was on board, and he headed over to speak with the activist and discuss his platform.

Every spring, activists dust off their brochures and park themselves in front of the Student Union on the campus of South Dakota State University (SDSU). While they mostly go unnoticed as they attempt to pass out their misinformation depicting farmers and ranchers in a poor light, once in awhile, they will catch the interest of students and get them thinking about where their food comes from.

The activist from Vegan Outreach passing out brochures on campus on April 27, 2010 probably had no idea that the only young people he would be talking to on campus that day were agriculture students with a bone to pick. When Wyatt DeJong received a text message about an animal rights activist on campus, he knew he had to take action. The word quickly spread in the agriculture community via texting and Facebook, and a call to action was set in place: initiate a conversation with the politician from Vegan Outreach. DeJong was on board, and he headed over to speak with the activist and discuss his platform.

Every spring, activists dust off their brochures and park themselves in front of the Student Union on the campus of South Dakota State University (SDSU). While they mostly go unnoticed as they attempt to pass out their misinformation depicting farmers and ranchers in a poor light, once in awhile, they will catch the interest of students and get them thinking about where their food comes from.

The activist from Vegan Outreach passing out brochures on campus on April 27, 2010 probably had no idea that the only young people he would be talking to on campus that day were agriculture students with a bone to pick. When Wyatt DeJong received a text message about an animal rights activist on campus, he knew he had to take action. The word quickly spread in the agriculture community via texting and Facebook, and a call to action was set in place: initiate a conversation with the politician from Vegan Outreach. DeJong was on board, and he headed over to speak with the activist and discuss his platform.

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Every spring, activists dust off their brochures and park themselves in front of the Student Union on the campus of South Dakota State University (SDSU). While they mostly go unnoticed as they attempt to pass out their misinformation depicting farmers and ranchers in a poor light, once in awhile, they will catch the interest of students and get them thinking about where their food comes from.

The activist from Vegan Outreach passing out brochures on campus on April 27, 2010 probably had no idea that the only young people he would be talking to on campus that day were agriculture students with a bone to pick. When Wyatt DeJong received a text message about an animal rights activist on campus, he knew he had to take action. The word quickly spread in the agriculture community via texting and Facebook, and a call to action was set in place: initiate a conversation with the politician from Vegan Outreach. DeJong was on board, and he headed over to speak with the activist and discuss his platform.

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