An emotional triumph for Adams brothers at Clark County Fair & Rodeo | TSLN.com

An emotional triumph for Adams brothers at Clark County Fair & Rodeo

LOGANDALE, NV – If not exactly a farewell to rodeo, the team roping win by brothers Jay and Randon Adams in the Clark County Fair & Rodeo had an air of finality to it. This was the first rodeo in the Adams’ hometown since their father, Wes, died Feb. 18, the first one where Wes could not be seen – midway up the grandstand – gesturing and offering advice, and the first since both brothers decided to get off the rodeo road and devote their full energies to their family’s businesses.

The Logandale rodeo committee had formally dedicated this Wrangler Million Dollar Silver Tour rodeo to Wes Adams’ memory, and his sons had quietly dedicated themselves to winning the team roping for the simplest of all reasons: because they knew it would have made their dad happy. When their younger brother, Austin, paired with header Jake Stanley to win the first round and Jay and Randon won the two-head average, there was a heady brew of smiles and tears in the Clark County Fairgrounds on April 10.

“It was emotional, real emotional,” Jay Adams said. “Words can’t express. The committee, the fans, even the other competitors were rooting for us to do well. It meant so much to us to win the rodeo.

“I didn’t really get choked up until a guy came up to me this morning (Monday) at the gas station and said, ‘Hey, I want you to know what you and your brother did in the arena means to our community. It lifted us up, gave us joy.’ My dad worked very hard and took a long time to be accepted for what he did (in the community). Now that he’s gone, it feels good to hear that people understood and appreciated him.”

Randon, the 2008 world champion team roping heeler, had decided late last year – after finishing 16th in the standings and just missing his fifth Wrangler National Finals Rodeo – that it was the right time to transition his life into business. Jay has been trying to take his athletic apparel business, Bex Products, to the next level and had decided to end his partnership with Austin to focus on Bex and to help elder brother, Weston, with other aspects of the family’s construction, heavy equipment, underground utility and ranch businesses.

Given that neither Jay nor Randon was planning a full season of rodeo competition, they agreed to rope together as they had as kids and into the early years of their pro careers. They entered a handful of major rodeos, including Fort Worth and San Antonio, and while they didn’t win any titles, they had steady earnings.

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Then came Logandale. When brother Austin and Jake Stanley won the first round in 4.8 seconds, Jay and Randon tied for second with Travis Tryan and Rich Skelton, a tenth-of-a-second back. A steady 5.1-second run in round two carried them to the average title over Spencer Mitchell and Broc Cresta (10.0 to 10.2) and $5,564 each.

“I scored well and took a high percentage shot,” Jay Adams said. “Randon threw fast at both of them, on the first hop. We roped just the way dad always coached us to do.”

Both of them are working at least 40-hour weeks in the “real world” now, checking into their offices at 7 a.m. and taking on a steep learning curve.

“Dad was such a multi-tasker that it takes all three brothers to do one-tenth of what he did,” Jay Adams said. “We have heavy hearts, but we are carrying on, trying every day to make the businesses better.”

What happens with the rodeo side of things, well, that’s not completely certain.

“Like my mom said at dinner last night, ‘I hate the word retired,'” Jay Adams said, “but I would be surprised if we left Wilderness Circuit competition very much. We might go to Cheyenne (WY), but Randon and I are both hell-bent on staying home.”

Randon seems even less sure about what happens next in his rodeo life. “We might go to a couple of them,” he said, “or possibly none of them. I moved home last year to spend time with my dad and start working for the business. My uncle died on Nov. 12 – my dad’s brother – and my dad died three months later.

“I’d already made my mind up to learn the business and help Weston. We are a very close family, and it’s the right time. I’m ready for this transition.”

The surest sign that Randon is stepping away from the sport he loves is that he has turned over his four-time AQHA/PRCA Team Roping (Heeling) Horse of the Year Diesel to Austin to use for the rest of the year.

The other champions at the Clark County arena were all-around cowboy Rhen Richard ($2,101 in team roping and tie-down roping), bareback rider Jake Vold (87 points), steer wrestler Stockton Graves (8.6 seconds on two head), saddle bronc rider Wade Sundell (87 points), tie-down roper Tuf Cooper (16.9 seconds on two head), bull rider Jake Wade (90 points) and barrel racer Angie Meadors (17.23 seconds).

LOGANDALE, NV – If not exactly a farewell to rodeo, the team roping win by brothers Jay and Randon Adams in the Clark County Fair & Rodeo had an air of finality to it. This was the first rodeo in the Adams’ hometown since their father, Wes, died Feb. 18, the first one where Wes could not be seen – midway up the grandstand – gesturing and offering advice, and the first since both brothers decided to get off the rodeo road and devote their full energies to their family’s businesses.

The Logandale rodeo committee had formally dedicated this Wrangler Million Dollar Silver Tour rodeo to Wes Adams’ memory, and his sons had quietly dedicated themselves to winning the team roping for the simplest of all reasons: because they knew it would have made their dad happy. When their younger brother, Austin, paired with header Jake Stanley to win the first round and Jay and Randon won the two-head average, there was a heady brew of smiles and tears in the Clark County Fairgrounds on April 10.

“It was emotional, real emotional,” Jay Adams said. “Words can’t express. The committee, the fans, even the other competitors were rooting for us to do well. It meant so much to us to win the rodeo.

“I didn’t really get choked up until a guy came up to me this morning (Monday) at the gas station and said, ‘Hey, I want you to know what you and your brother did in the arena means to our community. It lifted us up, gave us joy.’ My dad worked very hard and took a long time to be accepted for what he did (in the community). Now that he’s gone, it feels good to hear that people understood and appreciated him.”

Randon, the 2008 world champion team roping heeler, had decided late last year – after finishing 16th in the standings and just missing his fifth Wrangler National Finals Rodeo – that it was the right time to transition his life into business. Jay has been trying to take his athletic apparel business, Bex Products, to the next level and had decided to end his partnership with Austin to focus on Bex and to help elder brother, Weston, with other aspects of the family’s construction, heavy equipment, underground utility and ranch businesses.

Given that neither Jay nor Randon was planning a full season of rodeo competition, they agreed to rope together as they had as kids and into the early years of their pro careers. They entered a handful of major rodeos, including Fort Worth and San Antonio, and while they didn’t win any titles, they had steady earnings.

Then came Logandale. When brother Austin and Jake Stanley won the first round in 4.8 seconds, Jay and Randon tied for second with Travis Tryan and Rich Skelton, a tenth-of-a-second back. A steady 5.1-second run in round two carried them to the average title over Spencer Mitchell and Broc Cresta (10.0 to 10.2) and $5,564 each.

“I scored well and took a high percentage shot,” Jay Adams said. “Randon threw fast at both of them, on the first hop. We roped just the way dad always coached us to do.”

Both of them are working at least 40-hour weeks in the “real world” now, checking into their offices at 7 a.m. and taking on a steep learning curve.

“Dad was such a multi-tasker that it takes all three brothers to do one-tenth of what he did,” Jay Adams said. “We have heavy hearts, but we are carrying on, trying every day to make the businesses better.”

What happens with the rodeo side of things, well, that’s not completely certain.

“Like my mom said at dinner last night, ‘I hate the word retired,'” Jay Adams said, “but I would be surprised if we left Wilderness Circuit competition very much. We might go to Cheyenne (WY), but Randon and I are both hell-bent on staying home.”

Randon seems even less sure about what happens next in his rodeo life. “We might go to a couple of them,” he said, “or possibly none of them. I moved home last year to spend time with my dad and start working for the business. My uncle died on Nov. 12 – my dad’s brother – and my dad died three months later.

“I’d already made my mind up to learn the business and help Weston. We are a very close family, and it’s the right time. I’m ready for this transition.”

The surest sign that Randon is stepping away from the sport he loves is that he has turned over his four-time AQHA/PRCA Team Roping (Heeling) Horse of the Year Diesel to Austin to use for the rest of the year.

The other champions at the Clark County arena were all-around cowboy Rhen Richard ($2,101 in team roping and tie-down roping), bareback rider Jake Vold (87 points), steer wrestler Stockton Graves (8.6 seconds on two head), saddle bronc rider Wade Sundell (87 points), tie-down roper Tuf Cooper (16.9 seconds on two head), bull rider Jake Wade (90 points) and barrel racer Angie Meadors (17.23 seconds).

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