BioPRYN blood test assess pregnancy in cattle and horses | TSLN.com

BioPRYN blood test assess pregnancy in cattle and horses

Commercial producers can sell open cows earlier, generating more profit, by using an inexpensive blood test to detect pregnancy. In fact, the test is so simple, producers can draw blood from the cows themselves, and send it to a laboratory for testing.

“The test is 99 percent accurate,” says Tanya Madden of Eagle Talon Enterprises, LLC. Tanya operates a laboratory in Laramie, WY, where she analyzes blood to determine if the cows are pregnant. The blood test, known as BioPRYN, was developed in 1992.

Madden grew up on a ranch in the Black Hills of South Dakota. She holds a bachelors degree in Molecular Biology, and a masters degree in Animal and Veterinary Science. She started Eagle Talon Enterprises a few years ago after becoming interested in performing ultrasounds on cattle. Her business expanded to BioPRYN after visiting with ranchers about ways to improve the profitability and efficiency of their operations. “It was probably a year after I started looking into BioPRYN, before I added it to my business,” she explains. “It has worked out well for me, because I work with ranchers from all over.

“Producers like to use it to cull their cattle more accurately, and bred cows aren’t sent to the salebarn accidentally,” Madden says. “The test is also easy to do, and less physically demanding than palpation or ultrasound. It is also easier on the fetus because the uterus is not being manipulated, so there is less fetal loss.”

Commercial producers can sell open cows earlier, generating more profit, by using an inexpensive blood test to detect pregnancy. In fact, the test is so simple, producers can draw blood from the cows themselves, and send it to a laboratory for testing.

“The test is 99 percent accurate,” says Tanya Madden of Eagle Talon Enterprises, LLC. Tanya operates a laboratory in Laramie, WY, where she analyzes blood to determine if the cows are pregnant. The blood test, known as BioPRYN, was developed in 1992.

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Madden grew up on a ranch in the Black Hills of South Dakota. She holds a bachelors degree in Molecular Biology, and a masters degree in Animal and Veterinary Science. She started Eagle Talon Enterprises a few years ago after becoming interested in performing ultrasounds on cattle. Her business expanded to BioPRYN after visiting with ranchers about ways to improve the profitability and efficiency of their operations. “It was probably a year after I started looking into BioPRYN, before I added it to my business,” she explains. “It has worked out well for me, because I work with ranchers from all over.

“Producers like to use it to cull their cattle more accurately, and bred cows aren’t sent to the salebarn accidentally,” Madden says. “The test is also easy to do, and less physically demanding than palpation or ultrasound. It is also easier on the fetus because the uterus is not being manipulated, so there is less fetal loss.”

Commercial producers can sell open cows earlier, generating more profit, by using an inexpensive blood test to detect pregnancy. In fact, the test is so simple, producers can draw blood from the cows themselves, and send it to a laboratory for testing.

“The test is 99 percent accurate,” says Tanya Madden of Eagle Talon Enterprises, LLC. Tanya operates a laboratory in Laramie, WY, where she analyzes blood to determine if the cows are pregnant. The blood test, known as BioPRYN, was developed in 1992.

Madden grew up on a ranch in the Black Hills of South Dakota. She holds a bachelors degree in Molecular Biology, and a masters degree in Animal and Veterinary Science. She started Eagle Talon Enterprises a few years ago after becoming interested in performing ultrasounds on cattle. Her business expanded to BioPRYN after visiting with ranchers about ways to improve the profitability and efficiency of their operations. “It was probably a year after I started looking into BioPRYN, before I added it to my business,” she explains. “It has worked out well for me, because I work with ranchers from all over.

“Producers like to use it to cull their cattle more accurately, and bred cows aren’t sent to the salebarn accidentally,” Madden says. “The test is also easy to do, and less physically demanding than palpation or ultrasound. It is also easier on the fetus because the uterus is not being manipulated, so there is less fetal loss.”

Commercial producers can sell open cows earlier, generating more profit, by using an inexpensive blood test to detect pregnancy. In fact, the test is so simple, producers can draw blood from the cows themselves, and send it to a laboratory for testing.

“The test is 99 percent accurate,” says Tanya Madden of Eagle Talon Enterprises, LLC. Tanya operates a laboratory in Laramie, WY, where she analyzes blood to determine if the cows are pregnant. The blood test, known as BioPRYN, was developed in 1992.

Madden grew up on a ranch in the Black Hills of South Dakota. She holds a bachelors degree in Molecular Biology, and a masters degree in Animal and Veterinary Science. She started Eagle Talon Enterprises a few years ago after becoming interested in performing ultrasounds on cattle. Her business expanded to BioPRYN after visiting with ranchers about ways to improve the profitability and efficiency of their operations. “It was probably a year after I started looking into BioPRYN, before I added it to my business,” she explains. “It has worked out well for me, because I work with ranchers from all over.

“Producers like to use it to cull their cattle more accurately, and bred cows aren’t sent to the salebarn accidentally,” Madden says. “The test is also easy to do, and less physically demanding than palpation or ultrasound. It is also easier on the fetus because the uterus is not being manipulated, so there is less fetal loss.”

editor’s note: in addition to biopryn, madden also offers services for bvd-pi and johne’s testing. to learn more about eagle talon enterprises, visit http://eagletalonent.com or call 307-742-9072.

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