Black Hills Stock Show feature: Doug Butler, master farrier | TSLN.com

Black Hills Stock Show feature: Doug Butler, master farrier

by Rhonda Sedgwick Stearns

Courtesy photoJake, Doug and Pete Butler. Jake is a Director for the Butler Professional Farrier School and Pete teaches there.

A “kind eye” is an equine quality held in great esteem by those who make their living with horses – or even just use them to pursue their favorite sport. The trait horsemen describe in that term exudes a strong, quiet confidence, and exerts an inexplicable influence over that horse’s extended environment and every creature coming in contact with it.

Its the same trait Doug Butler exudes and permeates his farrier business: the economy of movement around the horse he works with; at the forge or with a shoe, perfecting it on the anvil or merging it with a meticulously prepared hoof. It inspires a sense of awe, similar to watching Michelangelo painting the Sistine Chapel.

It’s a struggle to identify all the qualities that embody this lithe, grey-haired gentleman whose fluid strides and lightning hammerstrokes merge so seamlessly with his equine patient they seem as one.

But one quality stands above the rest: dynamic confidence. A confidence born of unfathomable ability and long experience, strong enough to galvanize the horse – a horse possibly in pain, certainly in an alien, unfamiliar environment – into a calm and willing participant in its own rehabilitation.

A “kind eye” is an equine quality held in great esteem by those who make their living with horses – or even just use them to pursue their favorite sport. The trait horsemen describe in that term exudes a strong, quiet confidence, and exerts an inexplicable influence over that horse’s extended environment and every creature coming in contact with it.

Its the same trait Doug Butler exudes and permeates his farrier business: the economy of movement around the horse he works with; at the forge or with a shoe, perfecting it on the anvil or merging it with a meticulously prepared hoof. It inspires a sense of awe, similar to watching Michelangelo painting the Sistine Chapel.

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It’s a struggle to identify all the qualities that embody this lithe, grey-haired gentleman whose fluid strides and lightning hammerstrokes merge so seamlessly with his equine patient they seem as one.

But one quality stands above the rest: dynamic confidence. A confidence born of unfathomable ability and long experience, strong enough to galvanize the horse – a horse possibly in pain, certainly in an alien, unfamiliar environment – into a calm and willing participant in its own rehabilitation.

A “kind eye” is an equine quality held in great esteem by those who make their living with horses – or even just use them to pursue their favorite sport. The trait horsemen describe in that term exudes a strong, quiet confidence, and exerts an inexplicable influence over that horse’s extended environment and every creature coming in contact with it.

Its the same trait Doug Butler exudes and permeates his farrier business: the economy of movement around the horse he works with; at the forge or with a shoe, perfecting it on the anvil or merging it with a meticulously prepared hoof. It inspires a sense of awe, similar to watching Michelangelo painting the Sistine Chapel.

It’s a struggle to identify all the qualities that embody this lithe, grey-haired gentleman whose fluid strides and lightning hammerstrokes merge so seamlessly with his equine patient they seem as one.

But one quality stands above the rest: dynamic confidence. A confidence born of unfathomable ability and long experience, strong enough to galvanize the horse – a horse possibly in pain, certainly in an alien, unfamiliar environment – into a calm and willing participant in its own rehabilitation.

A “kind eye” is an equine quality held in great esteem by those who make their living with horses – or even just use them to pursue their favorite sport. The trait horsemen describe in that term exudes a strong, quiet confidence, and exerts an inexplicable influence over that horse’s extended environment and every creature coming in contact with it.

Its the same trait Doug Butler exudes and permeates his farrier business: the economy of movement around the horse he works with; at the forge or with a shoe, perfecting it on the anvil or merging it with a meticulously prepared hoof. It inspires a sense of awe, similar to watching Michelangelo painting the Sistine Chapel.

It’s a struggle to identify all the qualities that embody this lithe, grey-haired gentleman whose fluid strides and lightning hammerstrokes merge so seamlessly with his equine patient they seem as one.

But one quality stands above the rest: dynamic confidence. A confidence born of unfathomable ability and long experience, strong enough to galvanize the horse – a horse possibly in pain, certainly in an alien, unfamiliar environment – into a calm and willing participant in its own rehabilitation.

editor’s note: to learn more about doug butler and his horseshoeing school, visit http://butlerhorseshoeingschools.com and http://dougbutler.com to learn more.

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