Blizzard wreaks havoc on livestock producers | TSLN.com

Blizzard wreaks havoc on livestock producers

Steve Miller

Most producers in the region don’t appear to have suffered large-scale livestock losses from the March 23-24 blizzard, but they definitely lost some animals, according to preliminary reports from Extension officials and others.

As of news deadline, many ranchers in the region were still out checking on their cattle, many of which drifted during the blizzard, with snow driven by high winds gusting up to 80 mph.

They’ll have a better idea of losses by early next week.

“We’ve got some losses, but amounts are yet undetermined,” said Hugh Ingalls, who ranches west of Faith, SD. Ingalls said he and a couple of his grandsons spent all day Wednesday gathering cows and baby calves that had drifted about four miles south with the storm.

“We need to pair things up today, and see what we’re short,” Ingalls said Thursday morning. “The numbers are better than they might be, but there’s going to be some losses.”

He was thankful the storm didn’t last any longer. “Another day would have taken a real heavy toll,” he said.

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Like many other cattle producers in the area, Ingalls was in the middle of calving when the storm hit.

Farther north in Perkins County, SD, ranchers were reporting losses, but not on a large scale, according to Bob Drown, a South Dakota State University Cooperative Extension Service educator.

Drown said he spoke with half a dozen producers after the storm. One rancher said the storm left him with a bunch of sick baby calves, and a few died.

Most producers in the region don’t appear to have suffered large-scale livestock losses from the March 23-24 blizzard, but they definitely lost some animals, according to preliminary reports from Extension officials and others.

As of news deadline, many ranchers in the region were still out checking on their cattle, many of which drifted during the blizzard, with snow driven by high winds gusting up to 80 mph.

They’ll have a better idea of losses by early next week.

“We’ve got some losses, but amounts are yet undetermined,” said Hugh Ingalls, who ranches west of Faith, SD. Ingalls said he and a couple of his grandsons spent all day Wednesday gathering cows and baby calves that had drifted about four miles south with the storm.

“We need to pair things up today, and see what we’re short,” Ingalls said Thursday morning. “The numbers are better than they might be, but there’s going to be some losses.”

He was thankful the storm didn’t last any longer. “Another day would have taken a real heavy toll,” he said.

Like many other cattle producers in the area, Ingalls was in the middle of calving when the storm hit.

Farther north in Perkins County, SD, ranchers were reporting losses, but not on a large scale, according to Bob Drown, a South Dakota State University Cooperative Extension Service educator.

Drown said he spoke with half a dozen producers after the storm. One rancher said the storm left him with a bunch of sick baby calves, and a few died.

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