Bovine Respiratory Disease: Multi-institutional project underway to reduce BRD in cattle | TSLN.com

Bovine Respiratory Disease: Multi-institutional project underway to reduce BRD in cattle

Bill Brewster

A multi-institutional project is underway to develop cost-effective genomic and management approaches to reduce bovine respiratory disease (BRD) in beef and dairy cattle, according to information presented at the 2011 Beef Improvement Federation (BIF) 43rd Annual Research Symposium and Annual Meeting.

Dr. Allison Van Eenennaam with the University of California, Davis (UC Davis) animal science department, gave BIF attendees an update on the five-year project which is being undertaken by a consortium of universities and the USDA’s Agricultural Research Service (ARS).

During the presentation, titled “What weighting should be given to BRD resistance in selection decisions,” Van Eenennaam outlined facts about the project which is being conducted by more than two dozens scientists from Texas A&M, Washington State University, UC Davis, Colorado State, Missouri and ARS.

“Our goal is to integrate research, education and extension activities to develop cost-effective activities,” Van Eenennaam said, “to reduce the incidence of BRD in beef and dairy cattle.”

Van Eenennaam and USDA estimates the loss associated with BRD amounts to more than a million animals at a cost of $700 million annually. As part of the project, there are three main focus areas: research; education; and extension.

Holly Neibergs of Washington State University is the research coordinator. Researchers hypothesize: genetic selection for resistance to BRD coupled with improved animal health management can provide a significant, sustainable and profitable reduction in the prevalence of BRD. The research component is designed to identify genetic loci and genomic rearrangements associated with BRD and to use the data to develop DNA-based diagnostic tests and selection tools to identify BRD-resistant animals. The hypothesis notes that incorporating BRD into genetic evaluations and selection decisions offers a sustainable approach to reduce disease incidence. Selection for resistant animals will ultimately result in improved welfare, reduced antibiotic use and handling costs, superior production efficiency and improved profitability.

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Milt Thomas of New Mexico State University is the project’s education coordinator. The educational component is structured to develop undergraduate courses and offer educational and research internships to cultivate a future human resource for continued reduction in BRD prevalence. This component, Van Eenennaam said, includes networking with 4-H programs in various states.

Van Eenennaam is heading the extension portion of the project. The goal is to develop a sustained effort to disseminate and demonstrate, evaluate and document the impact of a range of educational outreach materials and best management practices for beef and dairy cattle producers and for feedlot personnel through extension materials.

A multi-institutional project is underway to develop cost-effective genomic and management approaches to reduce bovine respiratory disease (BRD) in beef and dairy cattle, according to information presented at the 2011 Beef Improvement Federation (BIF) 43rd Annual Research Symposium and Annual Meeting.

Dr. Allison Van Eenennaam with the University of California, Davis (UC Davis) animal science department, gave BIF attendees an update on the five-year project which is being undertaken by a consortium of universities and the USDA’s Agricultural Research Service (ARS).

During the presentation, titled “What weighting should be given to BRD resistance in selection decisions,” Van Eenennaam outlined facts about the project which is being conducted by more than two dozens scientists from Texas A&M, Washington State University, UC Davis, Colorado State, Missouri and ARS.

“Our goal is to integrate research, education and extension activities to develop cost-effective activities,” Van Eenennaam said, “to reduce the incidence of BRD in beef and dairy cattle.”

Van Eenennaam and USDA estimates the loss associated with BRD amounts to more than a million animals at a cost of $700 million annually. As part of the project, there are three main focus areas: research; education; and extension.

Holly Neibergs of Washington State University is the research coordinator. Researchers hypothesize: genetic selection for resistance to BRD coupled with improved animal health management can provide a significant, sustainable and profitable reduction in the prevalence of BRD. The research component is designed to identify genetic loci and genomic rearrangements associated with BRD and to use the data to develop DNA-based diagnostic tests and selection tools to identify BRD-resistant animals. The hypothesis notes that incorporating BRD into genetic evaluations and selection decisions offers a sustainable approach to reduce disease incidence. Selection for resistant animals will ultimately result in improved welfare, reduced antibiotic use and handling costs, superior production efficiency and improved profitability.

Milt Thomas of New Mexico State University is the project’s education coordinator. The educational component is structured to develop undergraduate courses and offer educational and research internships to cultivate a future human resource for continued reduction in BRD prevalence. This component, Van Eenennaam said, includes networking with 4-H programs in various states.

Van Eenennaam is heading the extension portion of the project. The goal is to develop a sustained effort to disseminate and demonstrate, evaluate and document the impact of a range of educational outreach materials and best management practices for beef and dairy cattle producers and for feedlot personnel through extension materials.

A multi-institutional project is underway to develop cost-effective genomic and management approaches to reduce bovine respiratory disease (BRD) in beef and dairy cattle, according to information presented at the 2011 Beef Improvement Federation (BIF) 43rd Annual Research Symposium and Annual Meeting.

Dr. Allison Van Eenennaam with the University of California, Davis (UC Davis) animal science department, gave BIF attendees an update on the five-year project which is being undertaken by a consortium of universities and the USDA’s Agricultural Research Service (ARS).

During the presentation, titled “What weighting should be given to BRD resistance in selection decisions,” Van Eenennaam outlined facts about the project which is being conducted by more than two dozens scientists from Texas A&M, Washington State University, UC Davis, Colorado State, Missouri and ARS.

“Our goal is to integrate research, education and extension activities to develop cost-effective activities,” Van Eenennaam said, “to reduce the incidence of BRD in beef and dairy cattle.”

Van Eenennaam and USDA estimates the loss associated with BRD amounts to more than a million animals at a cost of $700 million annually. As part of the project, there are three main focus areas: research; education; and extension.

Holly Neibergs of Washington State University is the research coordinator. Researchers hypothesize: genetic selection for resistance to BRD coupled with improved animal health management can provide a significant, sustainable and profitable reduction in the prevalence of BRD. The research component is designed to identify genetic loci and genomic rearrangements associated with BRD and to use the data to develop DNA-based diagnostic tests and selection tools to identify BRD-resistant animals. The hypothesis notes that incorporating BRD into genetic evaluations and selection decisions offers a sustainable approach to reduce disease incidence. Selection for resistant animals will ultimately result in improved welfare, reduced antibiotic use and handling costs, superior production efficiency and improved profitability.

Milt Thomas of New Mexico State University is the project’s education coordinator. The educational component is structured to develop undergraduate courses and offer educational and research internships to cultivate a future human resource for continued reduction in BRD prevalence. This component, Van Eenennaam said, includes networking with 4-H programs in various states.

Van Eenennaam is heading the extension portion of the project. The goal is to develop a sustained effort to disseminate and demonstrate, evaluate and document the impact of a range of educational outreach materials and best management practices for beef and dairy cattle producers and for feedlot personnel through extension materials.

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