Carcass quality begins at home | TSLN.com

Carcass quality begins at home

Amanda Nolz

“Carcass quality begins at home,” was the title of the presentation given by Amanda Weaver, professor of meat sciences in the Department of Animal and Range Science at South Dakota State University (SDSU) at the Summer Feedlot and Marketing Considerations Meeting held at Wobig Farms near Canova, SD. With a large attendance of cattle feeders at the meeting, Weaver offered some strategies for producers to consider in order to ensure a high quality beef eating experience for consumers to enjoy.

“What is quality?” asked Weaver. “Well, it depends on who you ask. There are two ways to look at meat quality. First, USDA Quality Grades measure palatability by assessing marbling and maturity through a USDA grader or camera. Second, consumers base quality on things like appearance, juiciness, flavor and tenderness. The trouble is that consumers want all of these things, and sometimes they are hard to attain. Tenderness has the greatest animal-to-animal variation, and there is no silver bullet to achieving a tender cut of beef.”

So, what is a producer supposed to do? Beef has too much variation from one piece of steak to another. The variation of the quality’s major player, tenderness, is influenced by numerous factors such as breed, maturity, genetics, marbling, stress, nutrition, age and sex of the animal, cut, chilling, pH, enhancement, hanging method, cooking method, and cut.

“Carcass quality begins at home,” was the title of the presentation given by Amanda Weaver, professor of meat sciences in the Department of Animal and Range Science at South Dakota State University (SDSU) at the Summer Feedlot and Marketing Considerations Meeting held at Wobig Farms near Canova, SD. With a large attendance of cattle feeders at the meeting, Weaver offered some strategies for producers to consider in order to ensure a high quality beef eating experience for consumers to enjoy.

“What is quality?” asked Weaver. “Well, it depends on who you ask. There are two ways to look at meat quality. First, USDA Quality Grades measure palatability by assessing marbling and maturity through a USDA grader or camera. Second, consumers base quality on things like appearance, juiciness, flavor and tenderness. The trouble is that consumers want all of these things, and sometimes they are hard to attain. Tenderness has the greatest animal-to-animal variation, and there is no silver bullet to achieving a tender cut of beef.”

So, what is a producer supposed to do? Beef has too much variation from one piece of steak to another. The variation of the quality’s major player, tenderness, is influenced by numerous factors such as breed, maturity, genetics, marbling, stress, nutrition, age and sex of the animal, cut, chilling, pH, enhancement, hanging method, cooking method, and cut.

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“Carcass quality begins at home,” was the title of the presentation given by Amanda Weaver, professor of meat sciences in the Department of Animal and Range Science at South Dakota State University (SDSU) at the Summer Feedlot and Marketing Considerations Meeting held at Wobig Farms near Canova, SD. With a large attendance of cattle feeders at the meeting, Weaver offered some strategies for producers to consider in order to ensure a high quality beef eating experience for consumers to enjoy.

“What is quality?” asked Weaver. “Well, it depends on who you ask. There are two ways to look at meat quality. First, USDA Quality Grades measure palatability by assessing marbling and maturity through a USDA grader or camera. Second, consumers base quality on things like appearance, juiciness, flavor and tenderness. The trouble is that consumers want all of these things, and sometimes they are hard to attain. Tenderness has the greatest animal-to-animal variation, and there is no silver bullet to achieving a tender cut of beef.”

So, what is a producer supposed to do? Beef has too much variation from one piece of steak to another. The variation of the quality’s major player, tenderness, is influenced by numerous factors such as breed, maturity, genetics, marbling, stress, nutrition, age and sex of the animal, cut, chilling, pH, enhancement, hanging method, cooking method, and cut.

“Carcass quality begins at home,” was the title of the presentation given by Amanda Weaver, professor of meat sciences in the Department of Animal and Range Science at South Dakota State University (SDSU) at the Summer Feedlot and Marketing Considerations Meeting held at Wobig Farms near Canova, SD. With a large attendance of cattle feeders at the meeting, Weaver offered some strategies for producers to consider in order to ensure a high quality beef eating experience for consumers to enjoy.

“What is quality?” asked Weaver. “Well, it depends on who you ask. There are two ways to look at meat quality. First, USDA Quality Grades measure palatability by assessing marbling and maturity through a USDA grader or camera. Second, consumers base quality on things like appearance, juiciness, flavor and tenderness. The trouble is that consumers want all of these things, and sometimes they are hard to attain. Tenderness has the greatest animal-to-animal variation, and there is no silver bullet to achieving a tender cut of beef.”

So, what is a producer supposed to do? Beef has too much variation from one piece of steak to another. The variation of the quality’s major player, tenderness, is influenced by numerous factors such as breed, maturity, genetics, marbling, stress, nutrition, age and sex of the animal, cut, chilling, pH, enhancement, hanging method, cooking method, and cut.

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