Cargill says preliminary E. coli cattle vaccine results show promise | TSLN.com

Cargill says preliminary E. coli cattle vaccine results show promise

Cargill said Monday (Nov. 15) it will begin a second stage of testing vaccines aimed at reducing E. coli in cattle, following promising results in the project’s first round. Dan Schaefer is Cargill’s assistant vice president for beef research and development. He spoke Sunday (Nov. 14) at the annual meeting of the U.S. Animal Health Association and said researchers saw a favorable immune-system response to the vaccine and the cattle had no adverse reaction.

The first trial this year involved vaccinating the entire cattle supply – 85,000 cattle – from 10 feedlots which were slaughtered at Cargill’s Fort Morgan, CO, plant from May-August. “We believe there is enough evidence to move forward with a second vaccine trial and anticipate doing so in the summer of 2011 at a Midwest beef processing facility supplied by mid-size feedlots in the region,” Schaefer said.

The data from the first trial is now being analyzed by independent researchers at Texas Tech and Kansas State Universities, USDA’s Meat Animal Research Center and the beef checkoff, he said, the results of which could be available early next year. Meanwhile, Cargill “is determining the best way to proceed with this science-based evolutionary process, which we hope will lead to validating the potential value of vaccine as another food safety tool for beef production,” Schaefer said.

Cargill said Monday (Nov. 15) it will begin a second stage of testing vaccines aimed at reducing E. coli in cattle, following promising results in the project’s first round. Dan Schaefer is Cargill’s assistant vice president for beef research and development. He spoke Sunday (Nov. 14) at the annual meeting of the U.S. Animal Health Association and said researchers saw a favorable immune-system response to the vaccine and the cattle had no adverse reaction.

The first trial this year involved vaccinating the entire cattle supply – 85,000 cattle – from 10 feedlots which were slaughtered at Cargill’s Fort Morgan, CO, plant from May-August. “We believe there is enough evidence to move forward with a second vaccine trial and anticipate doing so in the summer of 2011 at a Midwest beef processing facility supplied by mid-size feedlots in the region,” Schaefer said.

The data from the first trial is now being analyzed by independent researchers at Texas Tech and Kansas State Universities, USDA’s Meat Animal Research Center and the beef checkoff, he said, the results of which could be available early next year. Meanwhile, Cargill “is determining the best way to proceed with this science-based evolutionary process, which we hope will lead to validating the potential value of vaccine as another food safety tool for beef production,” Schaefer said.

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