Cattle marketing: What cattle buyers look for in calves sold off the ranch | TSLN.com

Cattle marketing: What cattle buyers look for in calves sold off the ranch

Cattle buyers have certain standards regarding the health management of calves prior to taking delivery of those calves. These prerequisites generally include specific vaccinations and pre-weaning management. Details vary from buyer to buyer based on preferences of the receiving feedlot, according to three cattle buyers from across the country.

In Indiana, Scott Gibson co-owns Eastern Livestock in Indiana, and says most buyers insist that calves have all their calfhood vaccinations and pre-weaning shots (8-way clostridial vaccine, IBR-BVD, PI3, pasteurella and other respiratory disease protection). Buyers also like to see the calves dewormed.

“Vaccinations are probably the most important thing. Calves need a vaccination and a booster. Some people just give one round of shots, but having the booster makes a bigger difference,” says Gibson. Without the booster, calves often lack adequate immunity.

“Some people don’t like the pasteurella shots and don’t give them, but we recommend giving calves all the respiratory shots because we’re not sure which ones are best and most buyers prefer calves to have all the shots,” he says.

Some feedlots don’t care whether calves have been weaned if they come from established herds with a good health program; but most prefer weaned calves.

“If the rancher has done a poor job of weaning them, however, the feedlot would rather just get the calves right off the cow. Then they can give them the shots they need. They’d rather take unweaned calves versus some that might have been weaned for only 20 to 30 days instead of 60,” Gibson says. Short-weaned calves are stressed and can’t handle the additional stress of shipping to a new place.

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“Some buyers are now asking for source- and age-verification; this is something that’s being required more frequently. My thinking is that if ranchers are progressive enough to source- and age- the calves, they will also be likely to give all the shots and manage the cattle like they should. Sometimes that premium can be $20 to $50, depending on the time of year, with supply and demand,” says Gibson.

Cattle buyers have certain standards regarding the health management of calves prior to taking delivery of those calves. These prerequisites generally include specific vaccinations and pre-weaning management. Details vary from buyer to buyer based on preferences of the receiving feedlot, according to three cattle buyers from across the country.

In Indiana, Scott Gibson co-owns Eastern Livestock in Indiana, and says most buyers insist that calves have all their calfhood vaccinations and pre-weaning shots (8-way clostridial vaccine, IBR-BVD, PI3, pasteurella and other respiratory disease protection). Buyers also like to see the calves dewormed.

“Vaccinations are probably the most important thing. Calves need a vaccination and a booster. Some people just give one round of shots, but having the booster makes a bigger difference,” says Gibson. Without the booster, calves often lack adequate immunity.

“Some people don’t like the pasteurella shots and don’t give them, but we recommend giving calves all the respiratory shots because we’re not sure which ones are best and most buyers prefer calves to have all the shots,” he says.

Some feedlots don’t care whether calves have been weaned if they come from established herds with a good health program; but most prefer weaned calves.

“If the rancher has done a poor job of weaning them, however, the feedlot would rather just get the calves right off the cow. Then they can give them the shots they need. They’d rather take unweaned calves versus some that might have been weaned for only 20 to 30 days instead of 60,” Gibson says. Short-weaned calves are stressed and can’t handle the additional stress of shipping to a new place.

“Some buyers are now asking for source- and age-verification; this is something that’s being required more frequently. My thinking is that if ranchers are progressive enough to source- and age- the calves, they will also be likely to give all the shots and manage the cattle like they should. Sometimes that premium can be $20 to $50, depending on the time of year, with supply and demand,” says Gibson.

Cattle buyers have certain standards regarding the health management of calves prior to taking delivery of those calves. These prerequisites generally include specific vaccinations and pre-weaning management. Details vary from buyer to buyer based on preferences of the receiving feedlot, according to three cattle buyers from across the country.

In Indiana, Scott Gibson co-owns Eastern Livestock in Indiana, and says most buyers insist that calves have all their calfhood vaccinations and pre-weaning shots (8-way clostridial vaccine, IBR-BVD, PI3, pasteurella and other respiratory disease protection). Buyers also like to see the calves dewormed.

“Vaccinations are probably the most important thing. Calves need a vaccination and a booster. Some people just give one round of shots, but having the booster makes a bigger difference,” says Gibson. Without the booster, calves often lack adequate immunity.

“Some people don’t like the pasteurella shots and don’t give them, but we recommend giving calves all the respiratory shots because we’re not sure which ones are best and most buyers prefer calves to have all the shots,” he says.

Some feedlots don’t care whether calves have been weaned if they come from established herds with a good health program; but most prefer weaned calves.

“If the rancher has done a poor job of weaning them, however, the feedlot would rather just get the calves right off the cow. Then they can give them the shots they need. They’d rather take unweaned calves versus some that might have been weaned for only 20 to 30 days instead of 60,” Gibson says. Short-weaned calves are stressed and can’t handle the additional stress of shipping to a new place.

“Some buyers are now asking for source- and age-verification; this is something that’s being required more frequently. My thinking is that if ranchers are progressive enough to source- and age- the calves, they will also be likely to give all the shots and manage the cattle like they should. Sometimes that premium can be $20 to $50, depending on the time of year, with supply and demand,” says Gibson.

Cattle buyers have certain standards regarding the health management of calves prior to taking delivery of those calves. These prerequisites generally include specific vaccinations and pre-weaning management. Details vary from buyer to buyer based on preferences of the receiving feedlot, according to three cattle buyers from across the country.

In Indiana, Scott Gibson co-owns Eastern Livestock in Indiana, and says most buyers insist that calves have all their calfhood vaccinations and pre-weaning shots (8-way clostridial vaccine, IBR-BVD, PI3, pasteurella and other respiratory disease protection). Buyers also like to see the calves dewormed.

“Vaccinations are probably the most important thing. Calves need a vaccination and a booster. Some people just give one round of shots, but having the booster makes a bigger difference,” says Gibson. Without the booster, calves often lack adequate immunity.

“Some people don’t like the pasteurella shots and don’t give them, but we recommend giving calves all the respiratory shots because we’re not sure which ones are best and most buyers prefer calves to have all the shots,” he says.

Some feedlots don’t care whether calves have been weaned if they come from established herds with a good health program; but most prefer weaned calves.

“If the rancher has done a poor job of weaning them, however, the feedlot would rather just get the calves right off the cow. Then they can give them the shots they need. They’d rather take unweaned calves versus some that might have been weaned for only 20 to 30 days instead of 60,” Gibson says. Short-weaned calves are stressed and can’t handle the additional stress of shipping to a new place.

“Some buyers are now asking for source- and age-verification; this is something that’s being required more frequently. My thinking is that if ranchers are progressive enough to source- and age- the calves, they will also be likely to give all the shots and manage the cattle like they should. Sometimes that premium can be $20 to $50, depending on the time of year, with supply and demand,” says Gibson.

Cattle buyers have certain standards regarding the health management of calves prior to taking delivery of those calves. These prerequisites generally include specific vaccinations and pre-weaning management. Details vary from buyer to buyer based on preferences of the receiving feedlot, according to three cattle buyers from across the country.

In Indiana, Scott Gibson co-owns Eastern Livestock in Indiana, and says most buyers insist that calves have all their calfhood vaccinations and pre-weaning shots (8-way clostridial vaccine, IBR-BVD, PI3, pasteurella and other respiratory disease protection). Buyers also like to see the calves dewormed.

“Vaccinations are probably the most important thing. Calves need a vaccination and a booster. Some people just give one round of shots, but having the booster makes a bigger difference,” says Gibson. Without the booster, calves often lack adequate immunity.

“Some people don’t like the pasteurella shots and don’t give them, but we recommend giving calves all the respiratory shots because we’re not sure which ones are best and most buyers prefer calves to have all the shots,” he says.

Some feedlots don’t care whether calves have been weaned if they come from established herds with a good health program; but most prefer weaned calves.

“If the rancher has done a poor job of weaning them, however, the feedlot would rather just get the calves right off the cow. Then they can give them the shots they need. They’d rather take unweaned calves versus some that might have been weaned for only 20 to 30 days instead of 60,” Gibson says. Short-weaned calves are stressed and can’t handle the additional stress of shipping to a new place.

“Some buyers are now asking for source- and age-verification; this is something that’s being required more frequently. My thinking is that if ranchers are progressive enough to source- and age- the calves, they will also be likely to give all the shots and manage the cattle like they should. Sometimes that premium can be $20 to $50, depending on the time of year, with supply and demand,” says Gibson.

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