China eyes livestock revolution | TSLN.com

China eyes livestock revolution

Jim Patrico

BEIJING (DTN) – Freshly slaughtered hogs lie in chunks on cutting boards in stall after stall in a Beijing market. Women with incredibly sharp knives carelessly slice pieces as they laugh and talk with women in other stalls.

In poultry stalls, whole chickens – with their heads still attached – hang from hooks or dangle over the edge of the stall. From early morning to night the meat sellers call to customers and to each other. Business is brisk.

A trip to a Beijing “wet market” illustrates how the Chinese like their pork and poultry.

But while these traditional wet markets exist and remain busy, urban American-style supermarkets are now available and cutting into their business.

Clean, bright, and with refrigerated meat and produce counters, these new supermarkets are necessary because so many urban Chinese want food they can pick up in a hurry on the way home from their jobs. New jobs give people more money than they ever dreamed of, money they use to eat better.

The extra money spent by the Chinese on meat may ultimately lead to more money in the pockets of U.S. soybean growers.

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Chinese Customs Statistics has said soybean imports rose in China, according to Reuters. “The value of imports of soybeans in the first seven months of this year rose 118.6 percent to $12.3 billion, but in volume terms the rise was only 22.8 percent, to 20.7 million tons,” reported Reuters this week.

Soybean imports are needed for hog expansion in China.

Joel Haggard, senior vice president for the Asia Pacific region for the U.S. Meat Export Federation, said in a press release Aug. 13 that USMEF is aware of six major companies planning to invest in large-scale hog farms. Also, during this year’s first six months, “China imported almost 4,600 breeding hogs – four times its average pace over the last three years,” he said.

He added, “U.S. pork and pork variety meat exports continued their surge in June, with 54,352 metric tons being shipped to China/Hong Kong – nearly four times the June 2007 total of 14,115 metric tons. As the largest volume destination for U.S. pork exports, China/Hong Kong led worldwide U.S. pork exports to a record-setting first half of 2008. Shipments to China/Hong Kong reached 254,445 metric tons – valued at $439.8 million – during this period.”

However, he expected it to slow as pork consumption fell this summer. “South China traders are now stating that because of full cold stores, falling domestic prices, and weak demand, there is margin pressure on new products arriving from the United States.”

BEIJING (DTN) – Freshly slaughtered hogs lie in chunks on cutting boards in stall after stall in a Beijing market. Women with incredibly sharp knives carelessly slice pieces as they laugh and talk with women in other stalls.

In poultry stalls, whole chickens – with their heads still attached – hang from hooks or dangle over the edge of the stall. From early morning to night the meat sellers call to customers and to each other. Business is brisk.

A trip to a Beijing “wet market” illustrates how the Chinese like their pork and poultry.

But while these traditional wet markets exist and remain busy, urban American-style supermarkets are now available and cutting into their business.

Clean, bright, and with refrigerated meat and produce counters, these new supermarkets are necessary because so many urban Chinese want food they can pick up in a hurry on the way home from their jobs. New jobs give people more money than they ever dreamed of, money they use to eat better.

The extra money spent by the Chinese on meat may ultimately lead to more money in the pockets of U.S. soybean growers.

Chinese Customs Statistics has said soybean imports rose in China, according to Reuters. “The value of imports of soybeans in the first seven months of this year rose 118.6 percent to $12.3 billion, but in volume terms the rise was only 22.8 percent, to 20.7 million tons,” reported Reuters this week.

Soybean imports are needed for hog expansion in China.

Joel Haggard, senior vice president for the Asia Pacific region for the U.S. Meat Export Federation, said in a press release Aug. 13 that USMEF is aware of six major companies planning to invest in large-scale hog farms. Also, during this year’s first six months, “China imported almost 4,600 breeding hogs – four times its average pace over the last three years,” he said.

He added, “U.S. pork and pork variety meat exports continued their surge in June, with 54,352 metric tons being shipped to China/Hong Kong – nearly four times the June 2007 total of 14,115 metric tons. As the largest volume destination for U.S. pork exports, China/Hong Kong led worldwide U.S. pork exports to a record-setting first half of 2008. Shipments to China/Hong Kong reached 254,445 metric tons – valued at $439.8 million – during this period.”

However, he expected it to slow as pork consumption fell this summer. “South China traders are now stating that because of full cold stores, falling domestic prices, and weak demand, there is margin pressure on new products arriving from the United States.”

BEIJING (DTN) – Freshly slaughtered hogs lie in chunks on cutting boards in stall after stall in a Beijing market. Women with incredibly sharp knives carelessly slice pieces as they laugh and talk with women in other stalls.

In poultry stalls, whole chickens – with their heads still attached – hang from hooks or dangle over the edge of the stall. From early morning to night the meat sellers call to customers and to each other. Business is brisk.

A trip to a Beijing “wet market” illustrates how the Chinese like their pork and poultry.

But while these traditional wet markets exist and remain busy, urban American-style supermarkets are now available and cutting into their business.

Clean, bright, and with refrigerated meat and produce counters, these new supermarkets are necessary because so many urban Chinese want food they can pick up in a hurry on the way home from their jobs. New jobs give people more money than they ever dreamed of, money they use to eat better.

The extra money spent by the Chinese on meat may ultimately lead to more money in the pockets of U.S. soybean growers.

Chinese Customs Statistics has said soybean imports rose in China, according to Reuters. “The value of imports of soybeans in the first seven months of this year rose 118.6 percent to $12.3 billion, but in volume terms the rise was only 22.8 percent, to 20.7 million tons,” reported Reuters this week.

Soybean imports are needed for hog expansion in China.

Joel Haggard, senior vice president for the Asia Pacific region for the U.S. Meat Export Federation, said in a press release Aug. 13 that USMEF is aware of six major companies planning to invest in large-scale hog farms. Also, during this year’s first six months, “China imported almost 4,600 breeding hogs – four times its average pace over the last three years,” he said.

He added, “U.S. pork and pork variety meat exports continued their surge in June, with 54,352 metric tons being shipped to China/Hong Kong – nearly four times the June 2007 total of 14,115 metric tons. As the largest volume destination for U.S. pork exports, China/Hong Kong led worldwide U.S. pork exports to a record-setting first half of 2008. Shipments to China/Hong Kong reached 254,445 metric tons – valued at $439.8 million – during this period.”

However, he expected it to slow as pork consumption fell this summer. “South China traders are now stating that because of full cold stores, falling domestic prices, and weak demand, there is margin pressure on new products arriving from the United States.”

BEIJING (DTN) – Freshly slaughtered hogs lie in chunks on cutting boards in stall after stall in a Beijing market. Women with incredibly sharp knives carelessly slice pieces as they laugh and talk with women in other stalls.

In poultry stalls, whole chickens – with their heads still attached – hang from hooks or dangle over the edge of the stall. From early morning to night the meat sellers call to customers and to each other. Business is brisk.

A trip to a Beijing “wet market” illustrates how the Chinese like their pork and poultry.

But while these traditional wet markets exist and remain busy, urban American-style supermarkets are now available and cutting into their business.

Clean, bright, and with refrigerated meat and produce counters, these new supermarkets are necessary because so many urban Chinese want food they can pick up in a hurry on the way home from their jobs. New jobs give people more money than they ever dreamed of, money they use to eat better.

The extra money spent by the Chinese on meat may ultimately lead to more money in the pockets of U.S. soybean growers.

Chinese Customs Statistics has said soybean imports rose in China, according to Reuters. “The value of imports of soybeans in the first seven months of this year rose 118.6 percent to $12.3 billion, but in volume terms the rise was only 22.8 percent, to 20.7 million tons,” reported Reuters this week.

Soybean imports are needed for hog expansion in China.

Joel Haggard, senior vice president for the Asia Pacific region for the U.S. Meat Export Federation, said in a press release Aug. 13 that USMEF is aware of six major companies planning to invest in large-scale hog farms. Also, during this year’s first six months, “China imported almost 4,600 breeding hogs – four times its average pace over the last three years,” he said.

He added, “U.S. pork and pork variety meat exports continued their surge in June, with 54,352 metric tons being shipped to China/Hong Kong – nearly four times the June 2007 total of 14,115 metric tons. As the largest volume destination for U.S. pork exports, China/Hong Kong led worldwide U.S. pork exports to a record-setting first half of 2008. Shipments to China/Hong Kong reached 254,445 metric tons – valued at $439.8 million – during this period.”

However, he expected it to slow as pork consumption fell this summer. “South China traders are now stating that because of full cold stores, falling domestic prices, and weak demand, there is margin pressure on new products arriving from the United States.”

BEIJING (DTN) – Freshly slaughtered hogs lie in chunks on cutting boards in stall after stall in a Beijing market. Women with incredibly sharp knives carelessly slice pieces as they laugh and talk with women in other stalls.

In poultry stalls, whole chickens – with their heads still attached – hang from hooks or dangle over the edge of the stall. From early morning to night the meat sellers call to customers and to each other. Business is brisk.

A trip to a Beijing “wet market” illustrates how the Chinese like their pork and poultry.

But while these traditional wet markets exist and remain busy, urban American-style supermarkets are now available and cutting into their business.

Clean, bright, and with refrigerated meat and produce counters, these new supermarkets are necessary because so many urban Chinese want food they can pick up in a hurry on the way home from their jobs. New jobs give people more money than they ever dreamed of, money they use to eat better.

The extra money spent by the Chinese on meat may ultimately lead to more money in the pockets of U.S. soybean growers.

Chinese Customs Statistics has said soybean imports rose in China, according to Reuters. “The value of imports of soybeans in the first seven months of this year rose 118.6 percent to $12.3 billion, but in volume terms the rise was only 22.8 percent, to 20.7 million tons,” reported Reuters this week.

Soybean imports are needed for hog expansion in China.

Joel Haggard, senior vice president for the Asia Pacific region for the U.S. Meat Export Federation, said in a press release Aug. 13 that USMEF is aware of six major companies planning to invest in large-scale hog farms. Also, during this year’s first six months, “China imported almost 4,600 breeding hogs – four times its average pace over the last three years,” he said.

He added, “U.S. pork and pork variety meat exports continued their surge in June, with 54,352 metric tons being shipped to China/Hong Kong – nearly four times the June 2007 total of 14,115 metric tons. As the largest volume destination for U.S. pork exports, China/Hong Kong led worldwide U.S. pork exports to a record-setting first half of 2008. Shipments to China/Hong Kong reached 254,445 metric tons – valued at $439.8 million – during this period.”

However, he expected it to slow as pork consumption fell this summer. “South China traders are now stating that because of full cold stores, falling domestic prices, and weak demand, there is margin pressure on new products arriving from the United States.”

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