Colostrum management important during calving season | TSLN.com

Colostrum management important during calving season

NDSU Animal Sciences Department

Calving season is in full swing for most of you who are reading this. In fact, I might be willing to wager that many of you are reading this issue of Tri-State Livestock News in a calving barn or from a cot in an office area where you are catching a few winks in between checking cows or heifers. In this week’s column, I’ll give you a few tips regarding colostrum as you prepare for calving season.

Colostrum contains many vital nutrients in addition to the immunoglobulins which are so important in developing an active immune system in a newborn calf. Colostrum contains approximately 22 percent solids, compared to approximately 12 percent in normal milk. In addition to the immunoglobulins, colostrum contains increased levels of protein, lactose, fat, vitamins A and E, and minerals compared to other milk.

In preparation for writing this article, I also learned something new. Vitamin E is a very important nutrient for the newborn calf, however, vitamin E is not transferred across the placenta very efficiently. This makes colostrum that much more important when it comes to vitamin E nutrition in the newborn.

These nutrients represent a very important source (read the “only” source) of these nutrients for the newborn calf aside from any nutrients which they catabolize from their own body tissues during periods of nutrient restriction.

The timing of colostrum intake is very important. When the calf is born, its gut is “open,” meaning it can easily absorb large proteins such as immunoglobulins. The process of closure begins soon after the calf is born; and by the time the calf is 24 hours old, absorption of immunoglobulins is reduced substantially. Eventually the gut closes and absorption of these important proteins no longer occurs. Calves should receive at least one quart of colostrum immediately after birth and another two to three quarts within the next 12 hours. This is one reason having a healthy, vigorous calf at birth is so important. Weak calves or those that experienced a difficult birth take longer to stand and nurse, putting them at a disadvantage in immunoglobulin absorption because the gut is already beginning to close.

A number of factors influence the amount of colostrum produced by the cow. Mature cows produce more colostrum than heifers. Dairy breeds produce more than beef breeds.

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Calving season is in full swing for most of you who are reading this. In fact, I might be willing to wager that many of you are reading this issue of Tri-State Livestock News in a calving barn or from a cot in an office area where you are catching a few winks in between checking cows or heifers. In this week’s column, I’ll give you a few tips regarding colostrum as you prepare for calving season.

Colostrum contains many vital nutrients in addition to the immunoglobulins which are so important in developing an active immune system in a newborn calf. Colostrum contains approximately 22 percent solids, compared to approximately 12 percent in normal milk. In addition to the immunoglobulins, colostrum contains increased levels of protein, lactose, fat, vitamins A and E, and minerals compared to other milk.

In preparation for writing this article, I also learned something new. Vitamin E is a very important nutrient for the newborn calf, however, vitamin E is not transferred across the placenta very efficiently. This makes colostrum that much more important when it comes to vitamin E nutrition in the newborn.

These nutrients represent a very important source (read the “only” source) of these nutrients for the newborn calf aside from any nutrients which they catabolize from their own body tissues during periods of nutrient restriction.

The timing of colostrum intake is very important. When the calf is born, its gut is “open,” meaning it can easily absorb large proteins such as immunoglobulins. The process of closure begins soon after the calf is born; and by the time the calf is 24 hours old, absorption of immunoglobulins is reduced substantially. Eventually the gut closes and absorption of these important proteins no longer occurs. Calves should receive at least one quart of colostrum immediately after birth and another two to three quarts within the next 12 hours. This is one reason having a healthy, vigorous calf at birth is so important. Weak calves or those that experienced a difficult birth take longer to stand and nurse, putting them at a disadvantage in immunoglobulin absorption because the gut is already beginning to close.

A number of factors influence the amount of colostrum produced by the cow. Mature cows produce more colostrum than heifers. Dairy breeds produce more than beef breeds.

Calving season is in full swing for most of you who are reading this. In fact, I might be willing to wager that many of you are reading this issue of Tri-State Livestock News in a calving barn or from a cot in an office area where you are catching a few winks in between checking cows or heifers. In this week’s column, I’ll give you a few tips regarding colostrum as you prepare for calving season.

Colostrum contains many vital nutrients in addition to the immunoglobulins which are so important in developing an active immune system in a newborn calf. Colostrum contains approximately 22 percent solids, compared to approximately 12 percent in normal milk. In addition to the immunoglobulins, colostrum contains increased levels of protein, lactose, fat, vitamins A and E, and minerals compared to other milk.

In preparation for writing this article, I also learned something new. Vitamin E is a very important nutrient for the newborn calf, however, vitamin E is not transferred across the placenta very efficiently. This makes colostrum that much more important when it comes to vitamin E nutrition in the newborn.

These nutrients represent a very important source (read the “only” source) of these nutrients for the newborn calf aside from any nutrients which they catabolize from their own body tissues during periods of nutrient restriction.

The timing of colostrum intake is very important. When the calf is born, its gut is “open,” meaning it can easily absorb large proteins such as immunoglobulins. The process of closure begins soon after the calf is born; and by the time the calf is 24 hours old, absorption of immunoglobulins is reduced substantially. Eventually the gut closes and absorption of these important proteins no longer occurs. Calves should receive at least one quart of colostrum immediately after birth and another two to three quarts within the next 12 hours. This is one reason having a healthy, vigorous calf at birth is so important. Weak calves or those that experienced a difficult birth take longer to stand and nurse, putting them at a disadvantage in immunoglobulin absorption because the gut is already beginning to close.

A number of factors influence the amount of colostrum produced by the cow. Mature cows produce more colostrum than heifers. Dairy breeds produce more than beef breeds.

Calving season is in full swing for most of you who are reading this. In fact, I might be willing to wager that many of you are reading this issue of Tri-State Livestock News in a calving barn or from a cot in an office area where you are catching a few winks in between checking cows or heifers. In this week’s column, I’ll give you a few tips regarding colostrum as you prepare for calving season.

Colostrum contains many vital nutrients in addition to the immunoglobulins which are so important in developing an active immune system in a newborn calf. Colostrum contains approximately 22 percent solids, compared to approximately 12 percent in normal milk. In addition to the immunoglobulins, colostrum contains increased levels of protein, lactose, fat, vitamins A and E, and minerals compared to other milk.

In preparation for writing this article, I also learned something new. Vitamin E is a very important nutrient for the newborn calf, however, vitamin E is not transferred across the placenta very efficiently. This makes colostrum that much more important when it comes to vitamin E nutrition in the newborn.

These nutrients represent a very important source (read the “only” source) of these nutrients for the newborn calf aside from any nutrients which they catabolize from their own body tissues during periods of nutrient restriction.

The timing of colostrum intake is very important. When the calf is born, its gut is “open,” meaning it can easily absorb large proteins such as immunoglobulins. The process of closure begins soon after the calf is born; and by the time the calf is 24 hours old, absorption of immunoglobulins is reduced substantially. Eventually the gut closes and absorption of these important proteins no longer occurs. Calves should receive at least one quart of colostrum immediately after birth and another two to three quarts within the next 12 hours. This is one reason having a healthy, vigorous calf at birth is so important. Weak calves or those that experienced a difficult birth take longer to stand and nurse, putting them at a disadvantage in immunoglobulin absorption because the gut is already beginning to close.

A number of factors influence the amount of colostrum produced by the cow. Mature cows produce more colostrum than heifers. Dairy breeds produce more than beef breeds.

Calving season is in full swing for most of you who are reading this. In fact, I might be willing to wager that many of you are reading this issue of Tri-State Livestock News in a calving barn or from a cot in an office area where you are catching a few winks in between checking cows or heifers. In this week’s column, I’ll give you a few tips regarding colostrum as you prepare for calving season.

Colostrum contains many vital nutrients in addition to the immunoglobulins which are so important in developing an active immune system in a newborn calf. Colostrum contains approximately 22 percent solids, compared to approximately 12 percent in normal milk. In addition to the immunoglobulins, colostrum contains increased levels of protein, lactose, fat, vitamins A and E, and minerals compared to other milk.

In preparation for writing this article, I also learned something new. Vitamin E is a very important nutrient for the newborn calf, however, vitamin E is not transferred across the placenta very efficiently. This makes colostrum that much more important when it comes to vitamin E nutrition in the newborn.

These nutrients represent a very important source (read the “only” source) of these nutrients for the newborn calf aside from any nutrients which they catabolize from their own body tissues during periods of nutrient restriction.

The timing of colostrum intake is very important. When the calf is born, its gut is “open,” meaning it can easily absorb large proteins such as immunoglobulins. The process of closure begins soon after the calf is born; and by the time the calf is 24 hours old, absorption of immunoglobulins is reduced substantially. Eventually the gut closes and absorption of these important proteins no longer occurs. Calves should receive at least one quart of colostrum immediately after birth and another two to three quarts within the next 12 hours. This is one reason having a healthy, vigorous calf at birth is so important. Weak calves or those that experienced a difficult birth take longer to stand and nurse, putting them at a disadvantage in immunoglobulin absorption because the gut is already beginning to close.

A number of factors influence the amount of colostrum produced by the cow. Mature cows produce more colostrum than heifers. Dairy breeds produce more than beef breeds.

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