CRP acceptance depends on land’s Environmental Benefit Index score | TSLN.com

CRP acceptance depends on land’s Environmental Benefit Index score

Courtesy photoLandowners who wish to enroll land in the 2010 CRP general sign-up should consider planting a diverse seed mix of eight species of native grasses and seven species of native forbs and wildflowers.

BROOKINGS, SD – Landowners eager to enroll marginal acres in the 2010 Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) general sign up this August need to focus on their land’s environmental benefit index (EBI) says Matt Morlock, farm bill biologist with Pheasants Forever.

“Whether your land gets accepted or not is based on the land’s EBI score. The higher the score, the better your chances are of getting in,” said Morlock, who aids landowners in signing up for conservation programs.

In South Dakota he says there is only one way to improve an EBI score.

“What you choose to plant for cover is the only way to improve a score in South Dakota,” Morlock said.

Influenced by the decline in bee populations nationwide, he says the EBI focus for the 2010 general enrollment focuses on diversity of seed planting.

“There is a push for diverse, bee pollinator plantings on CRP land to help encourage bee populations,” said Morlock, who developed a brochure which explains how landowners can increase their land’s EBI score.

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He encourages landowners to focus on CP 25 – a conservation practice which includes planting eight species of native grasses and seven species of native forbs/wildflowers.

“The key is planting the most diverse seed mix,” Morlock said.

BROOKINGS, SD – Landowners eager to enroll marginal acres in the 2010 Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) general sign up this August need to focus on their land’s environmental benefit index (EBI) says Matt Morlock, farm bill biologist with Pheasants Forever.

“Whether your land gets accepted or not is based on the land’s EBI score. The higher the score, the better your chances are of getting in,” said Morlock, who aids landowners in signing up for conservation programs.

In South Dakota he says there is only one way to improve an EBI score.

“What you choose to plant for cover is the only way to improve a score in South Dakota,” Morlock said.

Influenced by the decline in bee populations nationwide, he says the EBI focus for the 2010 general enrollment focuses on diversity of seed planting.

“There is a push for diverse, bee pollinator plantings on CRP land to help encourage bee populations,” said Morlock, who developed a brochure which explains how landowners can increase their land’s EBI score.

He encourages landowners to focus on CP 25 – a conservation practice which includes planting eight species of native grasses and seven species of native forbs/wildflowers.

“The key is planting the most diverse seed mix,” Morlock said.

editor’s note: this is the second in a series of four press releases designed to inform landowners and the general public about the 2010 crp general enrollment. to review morlock’s ebi brochure visit http://www.millbornseeds.com and click on “2010 ebi guide1.”

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