Dodge Wilderness Circuit Finals Rodeo results | TSLN.com

Dodge Wilderness Circuit Finals Rodeo results

OGDEN, UT – It’s just 14.7 miles from Jake Ashworth’s home in Layton, UT, to the Golden Spike Arena, and all the support from friends and family that came down the I-15 with him helped Ashworth secure the biggest win of his rodeo career.

“People kept asking me if ‘my entourage was coming,'” Ashworth said. “That was the running joke. I know I had seven family members and friends there for all three performances. And I’ve been known to have upwards of 30 in the stands.”

Ashworth has had success in that arena at the high school, college, amateur and professional levels and he says he “couldn’t have asked for a better setting” to earn his breakthrough win as steer wrestling champion at the Dodge Wilderness Circuit Finals Rodeo.

He’d come close a year ago, winning a round and finishing second in another, only to break a barrier and knock himself out of contention. This time, there were no such hiccups. Ashworth won the first round in 4.0 seconds, shared first place with Wyatt Kinghorn in round two (4.3) and placed fourth in the final round to secure the title.

Ashworth’s three-head time of 12.9 seconds was 2.4 seconds faster than runner-up Alex Hover, and assured him of qualifying for his first Dodge National Circuit Finals Rodeo next spring in Oklahoma City.

It was the nicest sort of boost for Ashworth, 30, who is not very far removed from believing his rodeo career was over.

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Ashworth stepped away from the sport for three years after graduating from Weber State University and taking a job in medical sales for Professional Hospital Supply. And it’s only been two years since childhood friend (and three-time Wrangler NFR qualifier) Clint Robinson helped coax him back to the arena on a limited basis.

Ashworth schedules about 30 rodeos a year, mostly close to home.

His sales territory covers northern Utah and southeastern Idaho, so there is some travel associated with that, and he and wife, Haylee, have a two-month-old daughter, Macklee, so he has been reluctant to extend the rodeo part of his life.

“I used to go full-time with Clint,” Ashworth said, “and there is a part of me that would like to compete more. If I were to do it, I’d want to be among the cream of the crop. I’m too competitive not to go all out.”

Robinson, who won the tie-down roping average over Nate Baldwin at the Wilderness Circuit Finals, was joking with Ashworth about going back on the road, saying, “You can’t come up here with me and just leave.”

Ashworth and Robinson have known each other since they were about 11 years old, and they remain good friends. They practice together whenever they can, even though Robinson now lives an hour away in Spanish Fork, UT.

Robinson and his dad, Lance, a six-time NFR qualifier who is about to be inducted into the Utah Sports Hall of Fame, have already offered to supply Ashworth with a good horse for the DNCFR, and Lance has offered to haze for him.

“It’s always awesome to perform in front of Lance and Clint,” Ashworth said. “It’s a little bit of pressure. There are a bunch of us (in Utah) who are sort of (Lance’s) barn crew. He taught us how to rope and bulldog. I’ve always looked up to both of them.”

The other champions to emerge from the competition at the Golden Spike Arena were bareback rider Cody DeMers (247 points on three head), team ropers Matt Sherwood and Randon Adams (17.6 seconds on three head), saddle bronc rider Jesse Wright (254 points on three head), bull rider Shawn Proctor (257 points on three head) and barrel racer Nancy Hunter (41.79 seconds on three runs).

Robinson had a rodeo-best $4,796, just ahead of Wright, who earned $4,659 in edging older brother (and 2008 World Champion) Cody for the second year in a row.

OGDEN, UT – It’s just 14.7 miles from Jake Ashworth’s home in Layton, UT, to the Golden Spike Arena, and all the support from friends and family that came down the I-15 with him helped Ashworth secure the biggest win of his rodeo career.

“People kept asking me if ‘my entourage was coming,'” Ashworth said. “That was the running joke. I know I had seven family members and friends there for all three performances. And I’ve been known to have upwards of 30 in the stands.”

Ashworth has had success in that arena at the high school, college, amateur and professional levels and he says he “couldn’t have asked for a better setting” to earn his breakthrough win as steer wrestling champion at the Dodge Wilderness Circuit Finals Rodeo.

He’d come close a year ago, winning a round and finishing second in another, only to break a barrier and knock himself out of contention. This time, there were no such hiccups. Ashworth won the first round in 4.0 seconds, shared first place with Wyatt Kinghorn in round two (4.3) and placed fourth in the final round to secure the title.

Ashworth’s three-head time of 12.9 seconds was 2.4 seconds faster than runner-up Alex Hover, and assured him of qualifying for his first Dodge National Circuit Finals Rodeo next spring in Oklahoma City.

It was the nicest sort of boost for Ashworth, 30, who is not very far removed from believing his rodeo career was over.

Ashworth stepped away from the sport for three years after graduating from Weber State University and taking a job in medical sales for Professional Hospital Supply. And it’s only been two years since childhood friend (and three-time Wrangler NFR qualifier) Clint Robinson helped coax him back to the arena on a limited basis.

Ashworth schedules about 30 rodeos a year, mostly close to home.

His sales territory covers northern Utah and southeastern Idaho, so there is some travel associated with that, and he and wife, Haylee, have a two-month-old daughter, Macklee, so he has been reluctant to extend the rodeo part of his life.

“I used to go full-time with Clint,” Ashworth said, “and there is a part of me that would like to compete more. If I were to do it, I’d want to be among the cream of the crop. I’m too competitive not to go all out.”

Robinson, who won the tie-down roping average over Nate Baldwin at the Wilderness Circuit Finals, was joking with Ashworth about going back on the road, saying, “You can’t come up here with me and just leave.”

Ashworth and Robinson have known each other since they were about 11 years old, and they remain good friends. They practice together whenever they can, even though Robinson now lives an hour away in Spanish Fork, UT.

Robinson and his dad, Lance, a six-time NFR qualifier who is about to be inducted into the Utah Sports Hall of Fame, have already offered to supply Ashworth with a good horse for the DNCFR, and Lance has offered to haze for him.

“It’s always awesome to perform in front of Lance and Clint,” Ashworth said. “It’s a little bit of pressure. There are a bunch of us (in Utah) who are sort of (Lance’s) barn crew. He taught us how to rope and bulldog. I’ve always looked up to both of them.”

The other champions to emerge from the competition at the Golden Spike Arena were bareback rider Cody DeMers (247 points on three head), team ropers Matt Sherwood and Randon Adams (17.6 seconds on three head), saddle bronc rider Jesse Wright (254 points on three head), bull rider Shawn Proctor (257 points on three head) and barrel racer Nancy Hunter (41.79 seconds on three runs).

Robinson had a rodeo-best $4,796, just ahead of Wright, who earned $4,659 in edging older brother (and 2008 World Champion) Cody for the second year in a row.

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