Equine overpopulation rages | TSLN.com

Equine overpopulation rages

Rhonda Sedgwick Stearns

The issue of equine overpopulation continues to rage. I noticed two of my favorite columnists in this publication addressed it last week. Someone should give Baxter an ambassadorship or knighthood for bein’ willing to wade right into the dragon’s lair with the HSUS!

Other publications have reports regarding the issue sprawled across their front pages. The government has denied the request of Mrs. T.Boone Pickens to create a refuge for some 30,000 wild horses on a million acres of Nevada public and private lands. They say “the plan is not viable under current federal law.”

Maybe that’s a shame… maybe that desert land wasn’t worth much for other purposes, and surely the stipend of $500 a year per horse requested by Madeline Pickens is far less than the government spends on them now. However, the Fed’s say the Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burro Act of 1971 allows for stipends to be paid “only to private landowners who care for federally-owned horses. And because public portions of the site lie outside grazing areas designate by the Act, federally-owned horses cannot be located there.”

Even so, this may not be the end of the matter. Nevada State BLM Director Ron Wenker said he hopes Pickens will consider other options. “We could contract the foundation to care for the wild horses on private land, or we could give her title to the horses making them private property without compensation,” Wenker said. “We haven’t closed the door.” Pickens’ spokesman Jay Rosser was unavailable for comment.

The popularity of blogging seems to be growing as fast as the president is spendin’ our money. If you’re interested in equine vet medicine you might enjoy author Leslie Guttman’s “Equine ER” blog on TheHorse.com. Leslie is a freelance journalist who spent more than a decade on the staff of the San Francisco Chronicle. She spent a year observing the sights, sounds and action inside the world-renowned Rood & Riddle Equine Hospital at Lexington, Kentucky, and has incorporated those experiences into her upcoming book Equine ER: A Year in the Life of an Equine Veterinary Hospital. The book is expected to be released in August.

Right now she posts new blog entries and videos each Monday at http://cs.thehorse.com/blogs/equine-er/default.aspx. This week’s edition deals with dummy foal syndrome and foal neurological problems which may result from difficult foaling; subjects of specific interest to a lot of horsemen at this time of year.

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Speaking of which, whatever kind of livestock you have it got way too cold last week! Hope you had yours all buttoned up and safe in plenty of protection.

The way time flies April will be here before we know it, so it’s not too early to remind you aspiring roughtstock riders and bull fighters of the 24th Annual Korkow Ranch Rodeo School that’ll be held at the ranch near Pierre, South Dakota, April 24th through 26th. NFR Qualifier Scott Montague will teach Bareback; World champ’s Jeff Willert and Chad Ferley will join three times NFR Average winner Tom Miller to coach Saddlebronc. DNCFR champ and NFR Qualifier Fred Boettcher will teach bull riding (including junior bull riding), while the bullfighting portion is directed by Chris Aman and Shane Anderson. This is one of the most respected and successful rodeo schools around and enrollment is limited. Check it out at http://www.korkowrodeos.com or email korkowrodeos@aol.com for an entry form; which is due with deposit by April 1st.

Talkin’ about roughstock schools, several generous individuals are coaching and schooling Wyoming High School Rodeo roughstock contestants this weekend in Torrington, Wyoming. John Forbes and Kelly Timberman are instructing, with horses provided by John Forbes, JD Hamaker and Rex Trumbull.

While we’re on the subject of high school rodeo, queen hopeful’s in Wyoming will be excited to know the WHSRA is moving the Queen Contest dates ahead to April 10th and 11th, so the winner will have more time to prepare for National competition in July. The WHSRA contest will be held in Thermopolis and anyone interested can contact WHSRA Queen Coordinator Chris Bentley at (307) 867-2555 or dasksa73@hotmail.com. Further good news for prospective queens involves additional sponsor money for Queen expenses, which is always welcome and needed.

The Wyoming Rodeo Association is kicked off its 2009 season at the Laramie County Community College arena in Cheyenne this weekend. The 350-member association is seeking new members, more rodeos and a better season overall. New president Jim McNamee from Burns, Wyoming says, “We would like to get more of the entire state of Woming involved in the WRA by recruiting more members and getting more communities to host rodeos, especially in the northern part of the state.” To learn more, check out the website http://www.swisherarena.com/wra or email wraoffice@aol.com.

If economic belt-tightening has struck at your place and if you live anywhere near Northwest College at Powell, Wyoming, you may be interested in taking advantage of their great rates for trimming and shoeing those ponies this spring. Northwest College farrier and blacksmithing instructor Rick Mettes says students in the NWC Farrier Science Program need experience and practice to perfect their skills. That’s why they’ll only charge you $7 for trimming and $20 for shoeing, and provide overnight stabling if necessary. For more information or appointment call (800) 560-4692, extension 6466.

If cow cutting is your game, the Cutting Horse Association of Nebraska has an event coming up at the Steerhead Arena four miles north of Hershey on March 28th and 29th, with a full slate of classes offered. Contact show secretary Jacquee Daniel at (402) 644-4665.

The news of more cowboy’s crossin’ over the Great Divide is always hard to deliver. This time it’s Kenneth A. Kane – rancher, rodeo hand and race horse man from the Sheridan, Wyoming area. Those of you who were in the Northwest Ranch Cowboy’s Association during the 1960’s and afterward will have good memories of this cowboy, who left us March 7th at the age of 75. He was in Phoenix, Arizona, and per his request, cremation has taken place and memorial services will be held later. Kane Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements, and condolences can reach Kenny’s daughter Janet Kane at (541) 892-2590.

Faith an’ Begorra, the day of the Irish is upon us! My cowboy and I say:

The issue of equine overpopulation continues to rage. I noticed two of my favorite columnists in this publication addressed it last week. Someone should give Baxter an ambassadorship or knighthood for bein’ willing to wade right into the dragon’s lair with the HSUS!

Other publications have reports regarding the issue sprawled across their front pages. The government has denied the request of Mrs. T.Boone Pickens to create a refuge for some 30,000 wild horses on a million acres of Nevada public and private lands. They say “the plan is not viable under current federal law.”

Maybe that’s a shame… maybe that desert land wasn’t worth much for other purposes, and surely the stipend of $500 a year per horse requested by Madeline Pickens is far less than the government spends on them now. However, the Fed’s say the Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burro Act of 1971 allows for stipends to be paid “only to private landowners who care for federally-owned horses. And because public portions of the site lie outside grazing areas designate by the Act, federally-owned horses cannot be located there.”

Even so, this may not be the end of the matter. Nevada State BLM Director Ron Wenker said he hopes Pickens will consider other options. “We could contract the foundation to care for the wild horses on private land, or we could give her title to the horses making them private property without compensation,” Wenker said. “We haven’t closed the door.” Pickens’ spokesman Jay Rosser was unavailable for comment.

The popularity of blogging seems to be growing as fast as the president is spendin’ our money. If you’re interested in equine vet medicine you might enjoy author Leslie Guttman’s “Equine ER” blog on TheHorse.com. Leslie is a freelance journalist who spent more than a decade on the staff of the San Francisco Chronicle. She spent a year observing the sights, sounds and action inside the world-renowned Rood & Riddle Equine Hospital at Lexington, Kentucky, and has incorporated those experiences into her upcoming book Equine ER: A Year in the Life of an Equine Veterinary Hospital. The book is expected to be released in August.

Right now she posts new blog entries and videos each Monday at http://cs.thehorse.com/blogs/equine-er/default.aspx. This week’s edition deals with dummy foal syndrome and foal neurological problems which may result from difficult foaling; subjects of specific interest to a lot of horsemen at this time of year.

Speaking of which, whatever kind of livestock you have it got way too cold last week! Hope you had yours all buttoned up and safe in plenty of protection.

The way time flies April will be here before we know it, so it’s not too early to remind you aspiring roughtstock riders and bull fighters of the 24th Annual Korkow Ranch Rodeo School that’ll be held at the ranch near Pierre, South Dakota, April 24th through 26th. NFR Qualifier Scott Montague will teach Bareback; World champ’s Jeff Willert and Chad Ferley will join three times NFR Average winner Tom Miller to coach Saddlebronc. DNCFR champ and NFR Qualifier Fred Boettcher will teach bull riding (including junior bull riding), while the bullfighting portion is directed by Chris Aman and Shane Anderson. This is one of the most respected and successful rodeo schools around and enrollment is limited. Check it out at http://www.korkowrodeos.com or email korkowrodeos@aol.com for an entry form; which is due with deposit by April 1st.

Talkin’ about roughstock schools, several generous individuals are coaching and schooling Wyoming High School Rodeo roughstock contestants this weekend in Torrington, Wyoming. John Forbes and Kelly Timberman are instructing, with horses provided by John Forbes, JD Hamaker and Rex Trumbull.

While we’re on the subject of high school rodeo, queen hopeful’s in Wyoming will be excited to know the WHSRA is moving the Queen Contest dates ahead to April 10th and 11th, so the winner will have more time to prepare for National competition in July. The WHSRA contest will be held in Thermopolis and anyone interested can contact WHSRA Queen Coordinator Chris Bentley at (307) 867-2555 or dasksa73@hotmail.com. Further good news for prospective queens involves additional sponsor money for Queen expenses, which is always welcome and needed.

The Wyoming Rodeo Association is kicked off its 2009 season at the Laramie County Community College arena in Cheyenne this weekend. The 350-member association is seeking new members, more rodeos and a better season overall. New president Jim McNamee from Burns, Wyoming says, “We would like to get more of the entire state of Woming involved in the WRA by recruiting more members and getting more communities to host rodeos, especially in the northern part of the state.” To learn more, check out the website http://www.swisherarena.com/wra or email wraoffice@aol.com.

If economic belt-tightening has struck at your place and if you live anywhere near Northwest College at Powell, Wyoming, you may be interested in taking advantage of their great rates for trimming and shoeing those ponies this spring. Northwest College farrier and blacksmithing instructor Rick Mettes says students in the NWC Farrier Science Program need experience and practice to perfect their skills. That’s why they’ll only charge you $7 for trimming and $20 for shoeing, and provide overnight stabling if necessary. For more information or appointment call (800) 560-4692, extension 6466.

If cow cutting is your game, the Cutting Horse Association of Nebraska has an event coming up at the Steerhead Arena four miles north of Hershey on March 28th and 29th, with a full slate of classes offered. Contact show secretary Jacquee Daniel at (402) 644-4665.

The news of more cowboy’s crossin’ over the Great Divide is always hard to deliver. This time it’s Kenneth A. Kane – rancher, rodeo hand and race horse man from the Sheridan, Wyoming area. Those of you who were in the Northwest Ranch Cowboy’s Association during the 1960’s and afterward will have good memories of this cowboy, who left us March 7th at the age of 75. He was in Phoenix, Arizona, and per his request, cremation has taken place and memorial services will be held later. Kane Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements, and condolences can reach Kenny’s daughter Janet Kane at (541) 892-2590.

Faith an’ Begorra, the day of the Irish is upon us! My cowboy and I say:

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