Equine piroplasmosis: Learn about this horse disease and how to prevent it | TSLN.com

Equine piroplasmosis: Learn about this horse disease and how to prevent it

It is a disease that lurks in a horse’s blood, with tiny protozoa attacking red blood cells. Equine piroplasmosis is common in tropical and sub-tropical regions of the world, including parts of Central and South America, the Caribbean, Africa, Europe, the Middle East and Asia, but is considered a foreign disease in the U.S., and efforts are underway to keep it that way.

Currently racetracks in 11 states require negative piroplasmosis tests before horses are allowed onto the backside. Beginning July 1, all horses entering the grounds for any AQHA world championship show will also be required to present a negative certificate dated within six months.

“As the industry leader, AQHA needs to be vigilant and establish testing requirements to ensure any case of equine piroplasmosis can’t be traced back to an AQHA event,” said Tom Persechino, AQHA executive director of competition and breed integrity. “We’re encouraging all exhibitors to contact their veterinarians to schedule these tests. If the tests are completed around the second week of July, that horse will be eligible to show at the youth, select and open/amateur world without requiring another test.”

It is a disease that lurks in a horse’s blood, with tiny protozoa attacking red blood cells. Equine piroplasmosis is common in tropical and sub-tropical regions of the world, including parts of Central and South America, the Caribbean, Africa, Europe, the Middle East and Asia, but is considered a foreign disease in the U.S., and efforts are underway to keep it that way.

Currently racetracks in 11 states require negative piroplasmosis tests before horses are allowed onto the backside. Beginning July 1, all horses entering the grounds for any AQHA world championship show will also be required to present a negative certificate dated within six months.

“As the industry leader, AQHA needs to be vigilant and establish testing requirements to ensure any case of equine piroplasmosis can’t be traced back to an AQHA event,” said Tom Persechino, AQHA executive director of competition and breed integrity. “We’re encouraging all exhibitors to contact their veterinarians to schedule these tests. If the tests are completed around the second week of July, that horse will be eligible to show at the youth, select and open/amateur world without requiring another test.”

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It is a disease that lurks in a horse’s blood, with tiny protozoa attacking red blood cells. Equine piroplasmosis is common in tropical and sub-tropical regions of the world, including parts of Central and South America, the Caribbean, Africa, Europe, the Middle East and Asia, but is considered a foreign disease in the U.S., and efforts are underway to keep it that way.

Currently racetracks in 11 states require negative piroplasmosis tests before horses are allowed onto the backside. Beginning July 1, all horses entering the grounds for any AQHA world championship show will also be required to present a negative certificate dated within six months.

“As the industry leader, AQHA needs to be vigilant and establish testing requirements to ensure any case of equine piroplasmosis can’t be traced back to an AQHA event,” said Tom Persechino, AQHA executive director of competition and breed integrity. “We’re encouraging all exhibitors to contact their veterinarians to schedule these tests. If the tests are completed around the second week of July, that horse will be eligible to show at the youth, select and open/amateur world without requiring another test.”

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