Ergot cattle poisoning potential exists this summer | TSLN.com

Ergot cattle poisoning potential exists this summer

BROOKINGS, SD – Weather conditions this spring and summer are proving to be just right for a certain kind of poisoning that can affect cattle on pasture says Russ Daly SDSU Extension Veterinarian.

“Cool, damp spring weather followed by the recent heat means that grasses are at increased likelihood of becoming infected with ergot bodies,” Daly said.

Ergot bodies appear as dark brown to black growths on top of the seed heads of grasses and grains. The growths vary in size. Ergot bodies result from infection of the grain by a fungus called Claviceps purpurea, which grows very well in warm weather and infects over 200 species of grasses throughout the country. Examples of plant species infected include; wheat, barley, oats, brome grass, and wheatgrass.

All domestic animals are susceptible to the effects of ergot; however, due to their diets, ruminants are usually more commonly affected than others Daly says.

The ergot bodies contain several toxic substances produced by the fungus, called ergot alkaloids explains veterinary pathologist, Regg Neiger.

“The effects of these toxins on animals can vary widely and cause both problems systemically overall, as well as with the extremities of the animal,” Neiger said.

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BROOKINGS, SD – Weather conditions this spring and summer are proving to be just right for a certain kind of poisoning that can affect cattle on pasture says Russ Daly SDSU Extension Veterinarian.

“Cool, damp spring weather followed by the recent heat means that grasses are at increased likelihood of becoming infected with ergot bodies,” Daly said.

Ergot bodies appear as dark brown to black growths on top of the seed heads of grasses and grains. The growths vary in size. Ergot bodies result from infection of the grain by a fungus called Claviceps purpurea, which grows very well in warm weather and infects over 200 species of grasses throughout the country. Examples of plant species infected include; wheat, barley, oats, brome grass, and wheatgrass.

All domestic animals are susceptible to the effects of ergot; however, due to their diets, ruminants are usually more commonly affected than others Daly says.

The ergot bodies contain several toxic substances produced by the fungus, called ergot alkaloids explains veterinary pathologist, Regg Neiger.

“The effects of these toxins on animals can vary widely and cause both problems systemically overall, as well as with the extremities of the animal,” Neiger said.

BROOKINGS, SD – Weather conditions this spring and summer are proving to be just right for a certain kind of poisoning that can affect cattle on pasture says Russ Daly SDSU Extension Veterinarian.

“Cool, damp spring weather followed by the recent heat means that grasses are at increased likelihood of becoming infected with ergot bodies,” Daly said.

Ergot bodies appear as dark brown to black growths on top of the seed heads of grasses and grains. The growths vary in size. Ergot bodies result from infection of the grain by a fungus called Claviceps purpurea, which grows very well in warm weather and infects over 200 species of grasses throughout the country. Examples of plant species infected include; wheat, barley, oats, brome grass, and wheatgrass.

All domestic animals are susceptible to the effects of ergot; however, due to their diets, ruminants are usually more commonly affected than others Daly says.

The ergot bodies contain several toxic substances produced by the fungus, called ergot alkaloids explains veterinary pathologist, Regg Neiger.

“The effects of these toxins on animals can vary widely and cause both problems systemically overall, as well as with the extremities of the animal,” Neiger said.

BROOKINGS, SD – Weather conditions this spring and summer are proving to be just right for a certain kind of poisoning that can affect cattle on pasture says Russ Daly SDSU Extension Veterinarian.

“Cool, damp spring weather followed by the recent heat means that grasses are at increased likelihood of becoming infected with ergot bodies,” Daly said.

Ergot bodies appear as dark brown to black growths on top of the seed heads of grasses and grains. The growths vary in size. Ergot bodies result from infection of the grain by a fungus called Claviceps purpurea, which grows very well in warm weather and infects over 200 species of grasses throughout the country. Examples of plant species infected include; wheat, barley, oats, brome grass, and wheatgrass.

All domestic animals are susceptible to the effects of ergot; however, due to their diets, ruminants are usually more commonly affected than others Daly says.

The ergot bodies contain several toxic substances produced by the fungus, called ergot alkaloids explains veterinary pathologist, Regg Neiger.

“The effects of these toxins on animals can vary widely and cause both problems systemically overall, as well as with the extremities of the animal,” Neiger said.

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