Farrier-client relationship: Be a better client for your farrier | TSLN.com

Farrier-client relationship: Be a better client for your farrier

Being a horseshoer, or farrier, is hard work. They spend all day bent over at the waist, holding up one corner of a horse that can weight 1,200 lbs. or more. This causes problems with their lower back, hips and knees. They pound on iron when they are shaping a shoe, and the concussion from the hammer, over time, causes arthritis and other problems in their hands, wrists and shoulders.

Risk-wise, being a farrier is in the same insurance category as a bullfighter or an oil field firefighter. If the farrier gets hurt, there’s no workman’s compensation to pay the bills until he’s back to work again.

In a nutshell, it’s a hard job with high risks, a high-expense-to-income ratio and little tangible reward aside from knowing that a job was well done and the horse is better off for it. It’s that satisfaction that keeps a farrier going.

Some farriers are certainly better at their job than others. Some are well-trained school-wise, but not experienced enough or don’t know enough about horses and horse behavior to do a good job. On the other end of the spectrum is the experienced farrier who has shod for many years, is a good horseman, has never quit trying to improve his craft, and does the best job he can for each horse. Often, this farrier didn’t go to a farrier’s school, but learned in a hands-on, perhaps apprenticed, situation.

No matter what the background is of your farrier, though, they all have the same needs as any craftsman and businessman. This article is meant to enlighten horse owners and have them be a better customer to their farrier.

Being a horseshoer, or farrier, is hard work. They spend all day bent over at the waist, holding up one corner of a horse that can weight 1,200 lbs. or more. This causes problems with their lower back, hips and knees. They pound on iron when they are shaping a shoe, and the concussion from the hammer, over time, causes arthritis and other problems in their hands, wrists and shoulders.

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Risk-wise, being a farrier is in the same insurance category as a bullfighter or an oil field firefighter. If the farrier gets hurt, there’s no workman’s compensation to pay the bills until he’s back to work again.

In a nutshell, it’s a hard job with high risks, a high-expense-to-income ratio and little tangible reward aside from knowing that a job was well done and the horse is better off for it. It’s that satisfaction that keeps a farrier going.

Some farriers are certainly better at their job than others. Some are well-trained school-wise, but not experienced enough or don’t know enough about horses and horse behavior to do a good job. On the other end of the spectrum is the experienced farrier who has shod for many years, is a good horseman, has never quit trying to improve his craft, and does the best job he can for each horse. Often, this farrier didn’t go to a farrier’s school, but learned in a hands-on, perhaps apprenticed, situation.

No matter what the background is of your farrier, though, they all have the same needs as any craftsman and businessman. This article is meant to enlighten horse owners and have them be a better customer to their farrier.

Being a horseshoer, or farrier, is hard work. They spend all day bent over at the waist, holding up one corner of a horse that can weight 1,200 lbs. or more. This causes problems with their lower back, hips and knees. They pound on iron when they are shaping a shoe, and the concussion from the hammer, over time, causes arthritis and other problems in their hands, wrists and shoulders.

Risk-wise, being a farrier is in the same insurance category as a bullfighter or an oil field firefighter. If the farrier gets hurt, there’s no workman’s compensation to pay the bills until he’s back to work again.

In a nutshell, it’s a hard job with high risks, a high-expense-to-income ratio and little tangible reward aside from knowing that a job was well done and the horse is better off for it. It’s that satisfaction that keeps a farrier going.

Some farriers are certainly better at their job than others. Some are well-trained school-wise, but not experienced enough or don’t know enough about horses and horse behavior to do a good job. On the other end of the spectrum is the experienced farrier who has shod for many years, is a good horseman, has never quit trying to improve his craft, and does the best job he can for each horse. Often, this farrier didn’t go to a farrier’s school, but learned in a hands-on, perhaps apprenticed, situation.

No matter what the background is of your farrier, though, they all have the same needs as any craftsman and businessman. This article is meant to enlighten horse owners and have them be a better customer to their farrier.

Being a horseshoer, or farrier, is hard work. They spend all day bent over at the waist, holding up one corner of a horse that can weight 1,200 lbs. or more. This causes problems with their lower back, hips and knees. They pound on iron when they are shaping a shoe, and the concussion from the hammer, over time, causes arthritis and other problems in their hands, wrists and shoulders.

Risk-wise, being a farrier is in the same insurance category as a bullfighter or an oil field firefighter. If the farrier gets hurt, there’s no workman’s compensation to pay the bills until he’s back to work again.

In a nutshell, it’s a hard job with high risks, a high-expense-to-income ratio and little tangible reward aside from knowing that a job was well done and the horse is better off for it. It’s that satisfaction that keeps a farrier going.

Some farriers are certainly better at their job than others. Some are well-trained school-wise, but not experienced enough or don’t know enough about horses and horse behavior to do a good job. On the other end of the spectrum is the experienced farrier who has shod for many years, is a good horseman, has never quit trying to improve his craft, and does the best job he can for each horse. Often, this farrier didn’t go to a farrier’s school, but learned in a hands-on, perhaps apprenticed, situation.

No matter what the background is of your farrier, though, they all have the same needs as any craftsman and businessman. This article is meant to enlighten horse owners and have them be a better customer to their farrier.

Being a horseshoer, or farrier, is hard work. They spend all day bent over at the waist, holding up one corner of a horse that can weight 1,200 lbs. or more. This causes problems with their lower back, hips and knees. They pound on iron when they are shaping a shoe, and the concussion from the hammer, over time, causes arthritis and other problems in their hands, wrists and shoulders.

Risk-wise, being a farrier is in the same insurance category as a bullfighter or an oil field firefighter. If the farrier gets hurt, there’s no workman’s compensation to pay the bills until he’s back to work again.

In a nutshell, it’s a hard job with high risks, a high-expense-to-income ratio and little tangible reward aside from knowing that a job was well done and the horse is better off for it. It’s that satisfaction that keeps a farrier going.

Some farriers are certainly better at their job than others. Some are well-trained school-wise, but not experienced enough or don’t know enough about horses and horse behavior to do a good job. On the other end of the spectrum is the experienced farrier who has shod for many years, is a good horseman, has never quit trying to improve his craft, and does the best job he can for each horse. Often, this farrier didn’t go to a farrier’s school, but learned in a hands-on, perhaps apprenticed, situation.

No matter what the background is of your farrier, though, they all have the same needs as any craftsman and businessman. This article is meant to enlighten horse owners and have them be a better customer to their farrier.

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