Figuring out the heyday of hay | TSLN.com

Figuring out the heyday of hay

Dan Davidson
DTN Agronomist

DTN file photoOf all the markets to aim for, DTN Agronomist Daniel Davidson believes the finishing feedlot market is the biggest for his quality of grasses and crop residue.

OMAHA (DTN) – On our family farm in northeast Nebraska, we bale crop residues and forages to sell or use on the farm. Products include crop residues like cornstalks and wheat straw, annual forages with sudangrass and winter cereal rye, warm- and cool-season grass mixes grown on conservation reserve program acres, and perennial forages like alfalfa and red clover.

In 2009, I will try teff, another annual forage native to Ethiopia, where it is grown as a cereal.

I need to better understand the available market. I want to sell cornstalks and wheat straw to finishing feedlots, other feedstock to backgrounding feedlots, and alfalfa and hay to cow calf operators – if such opportunities exist.

Normally, I bale off the material and then sell it to feedlots. I price it according to its market value, but get pushback on price when I try to position the feed according to its nutrient quality. I never really understood why, since most of the bales go to a finishing feedlot.

OMAHA (DTN) – On our family farm in northeast Nebraska, we bale crop residues and forages to sell or use on the farm. Products include crop residues like cornstalks and wheat straw, annual forages with sudangrass and winter cereal rye, warm- and cool-season grass mixes grown on conservation reserve program acres, and perennial forages like alfalfa and red clover.

In 2009, I will try teff, another annual forage native to Ethiopia, where it is grown as a cereal.

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I need to better understand the available market. I want to sell cornstalks and wheat straw to finishing feedlots, other feedstock to backgrounding feedlots, and alfalfa and hay to cow calf operators – if such opportunities exist.

Normally, I bale off the material and then sell it to feedlots. I price it according to its market value, but get pushback on price when I try to position the feed according to its nutrient quality. I never really understood why, since most of the bales go to a finishing feedlot.

OMAHA (DTN) – On our family farm in northeast Nebraska, we bale crop residues and forages to sell or use on the farm. Products include crop residues like cornstalks and wheat straw, annual forages with sudangrass and winter cereal rye, warm- and cool-season grass mixes grown on conservation reserve program acres, and perennial forages like alfalfa and red clover.

In 2009, I will try teff, another annual forage native to Ethiopia, where it is grown as a cereal.

I need to better understand the available market. I want to sell cornstalks and wheat straw to finishing feedlots, other feedstock to backgrounding feedlots, and alfalfa and hay to cow calf operators – if such opportunities exist.

Normally, I bale off the material and then sell it to feedlots. I price it according to its market value, but get pushback on price when I try to position the feed according to its nutrient quality. I never really understood why, since most of the bales go to a finishing feedlot.

OMAHA (DTN) – On our family farm in northeast Nebraska, we bale crop residues and forages to sell or use on the farm. Products include crop residues like cornstalks and wheat straw, annual forages with sudangrass and winter cereal rye, warm- and cool-season grass mixes grown on conservation reserve program acres, and perennial forages like alfalfa and red clover.

In 2009, I will try teff, another annual forage native to Ethiopia, where it is grown as a cereal.

I need to better understand the available market. I want to sell cornstalks and wheat straw to finishing feedlots, other feedstock to backgrounding feedlots, and alfalfa and hay to cow calf operators – if such opportunities exist.

Normally, I bale off the material and then sell it to feedlots. I price it according to its market value, but get pushback on price when I try to position the feed according to its nutrient quality. I never really understood why, since most of the bales go to a finishing feedlot.

OMAHA (DTN) – On our family farm in northeast Nebraska, we bale crop residues and forages to sell or use on the farm. Products include crop residues like cornstalks and wheat straw, annual forages with sudangrass and winter cereal rye, warm- and cool-season grass mixes grown on conservation reserve program acres, and perennial forages like alfalfa and red clover.

In 2009, I will try teff, another annual forage native to Ethiopia, where it is grown as a cereal.

I need to better understand the available market. I want to sell cornstalks and wheat straw to finishing feedlots, other feedstock to backgrounding feedlots, and alfalfa and hay to cow calf operators – if such opportunities exist.

Normally, I bale off the material and then sell it to feedlots. I price it according to its market value, but get pushback on price when I try to position the feed according to its nutrient quality. I never really understood why, since most of the bales go to a finishing feedlot.

dan davidson can be reached at daniel.davidson@dtn.com

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