First Cattle Country Video auction surpasses organizers expectations | TSLN.com

First Cattle Country Video auction surpasses organizers expectations

Gayle Smith

After working nearly a year to organize their own video auction, the three principal owners of Cattle Country Video (CCV) were pleasantly surprised at the support they received from both buyers and sellers during their first auction, the High Plains Showcase, held July 1-2 in Cheyenne, WY.

Shawn and Lex Madden and Michael Schmitt are the principal owners of Cattle Country Video Auction, an endeavor they started working on last fall. “We have been in the ownership of two livestock markets for 22 years now,” Lex Madden explained. “We grew up with the salebarn business, and have been involved in video marketing for 19 years. We believe the technology is here, and we needed to offer this as a service to our customers.

“We have many customers who are loyal to the salebarn,” he continued. “We realize the video auction is not for everyone, and the salebarn is not for everyone. Our goal is to offer our customers as many choices as possible. We feel by offering the Cattle Country Video, it broadens our buyers base. We have found new buyers from other states who are interested in the cattle we have here. It has also brought our customer base to other states. We look at the video auction as a compliment to our existing business, not a threat. It is definitely an asset,” Lex said.

Even though they were well-prepared for starting their own video auction company, they were amazed at the support this first auction garnered from buyers and sellers alike. “Actually, we want to sincerely thank our buyers and sellers for their support of this first sale,” Lex said. “We really thought this first video auction would be a one-day sale, and we would have about 25,000 head of cattle. We were pleasantly surprised to have our customers support us with 51,000 head of cattle for this first sale.”

Although the first auction wasn’t without a few minor glitches, Lex said they have received very positive feedback from the buyers and sellers. “We have had buyers call us to say they are just interested in buying cattle from this region,” he explained. The quality of cattle produced in the region is one of the reasons the trio set out to start CCV. “We are very fortunate to have some of the best cattle in the United States, and some of the best genetics,” Lex explained. “We have a lot of repeat buyers that buy our cattle because of the way they perform.”

In fact, Cattle Country Video focuses only on cattle from this region. The cattle marketed through the auction are limited to producers in Montana, Wyoming, South Dakota, Nebraska, Colorado, North Dakota, Kansas and Utah.

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Lex said the 51,000 head of cattle sold during the two-day auction made up 300 lots. Of those, 296 lots actually sold during the video auction. He was very pleased that so many cattle were sold. “That is one thing producers like about selling their cattle through a video auction. If they don’t like the price, they can pass them without stressing the cattle or having the expense of trucking and shipping,” he explained.

“We haven’t had too many feeder cattle through the barn during the last few weeks, since most of the cattle are grazing. We thought the market was very strong even though the price of corn on the Chicago Mercantile went up 42 and a half cents the day of and the day prior to the video auction. When corn goes up, then feeders historically go down,” he explained.

During the video auction, Lex said they were surprised how many people came to show support and purchase cattle. The first day, there were nearly 350 people in attendance at the Little America hotel in Cheyenne. During the second day, there were still about 200-250 people. In addition, during the two-day sale, more than 920 people logged on to the auction through cattleusa.com. “Some were logged on just out of curiosity, but a lot of them were logged on to bid,” he said.

The sale was broadcast live on Dish Network channel 219, and Lex said 19 phone lines were set up at Little America for buyers to call in and bid. “We had our representatives answering the phones,” he said. Buyers from 13 states participated in the auction.

Lex said he and his staff were very pleased with the sale. “We wanted everything to go off with this first sale professionally and smoothly,” he said. “We want to build on this and offer another choice for the producers in this region.” The next auction, the Oregon Trail Classic, will be held Aug. 12-13 at the Gering Civic Center, Gering, NE. A third auction, the Sandhills Roundup, will be held at Haythorn Land and Cattle Company, Ogallala, NE, on Sept. 16.

“Our goal is to handle good cattle for good people and serve as good representatives,” Lex explained. “We want to keep our buyers happy, and still get the maximum return for our producers.”

After working nearly a year to organize their own video auction, the three principal owners of Cattle Country Video (CCV) were pleasantly surprised at the support they received from both buyers and sellers during their first auction, the High Plains Showcase, held July 1-2 in Cheyenne, WY.

Shawn and Lex Madden and Michael Schmitt are the principal owners of Cattle Country Video Auction, an endeavor they started working on last fall. “We have been in the ownership of two livestock markets for 22 years now,” Lex Madden explained. “We grew up with the salebarn business, and have been involved in video marketing for 19 years. We believe the technology is here, and we needed to offer this as a service to our customers.

“We have many customers who are loyal to the salebarn,” he continued. “We realize the video auction is not for everyone, and the salebarn is not for everyone. Our goal is to offer our customers as many choices as possible. We feel by offering the Cattle Country Video, it broadens our buyers base. We have found new buyers from other states who are interested in the cattle we have here. It has also brought our customer base to other states. We look at the video auction as a compliment to our existing business, not a threat. It is definitely an asset,” Lex said.

Even though they were well-prepared for starting their own video auction company, they were amazed at the support this first auction garnered from buyers and sellers alike. “Actually, we want to sincerely thank our buyers and sellers for their support of this first sale,” Lex said. “We really thought this first video auction would be a one-day sale, and we would have about 25,000 head of cattle. We were pleasantly surprised to have our customers support us with 51,000 head of cattle for this first sale.”

Although the first auction wasn’t without a few minor glitches, Lex said they have received very positive feedback from the buyers and sellers. “We have had buyers call us to say they are just interested in buying cattle from this region,” he explained. The quality of cattle produced in the region is one of the reasons the trio set out to start CCV. “We are very fortunate to have some of the best cattle in the United States, and some of the best genetics,” Lex explained. “We have a lot of repeat buyers that buy our cattle because of the way they perform.”

In fact, Cattle Country Video focuses only on cattle from this region. The cattle marketed through the auction are limited to producers in Montana, Wyoming, South Dakota, Nebraska, Colorado, North Dakota, Kansas and Utah.

Lex said the 51,000 head of cattle sold during the two-day auction made up 300 lots. Of those, 296 lots actually sold during the video auction. He was very pleased that so many cattle were sold. “That is one thing producers like about selling their cattle through a video auction. If they don’t like the price, they can pass them without stressing the cattle or having the expense of trucking and shipping,” he explained.

“We haven’t had too many feeder cattle through the barn during the last few weeks, since most of the cattle are grazing. We thought the market was very strong even though the price of corn on the Chicago Mercantile went up 42 and a half cents the day of and the day prior to the video auction. When corn goes up, then feeders historically go down,” he explained.

During the video auction, Lex said they were surprised how many people came to show support and purchase cattle. The first day, there were nearly 350 people in attendance at the Little America hotel in Cheyenne. During the second day, there were still about 200-250 people. In addition, during the two-day sale, more than 920 people logged on to the auction through cattleusa.com. “Some were logged on just out of curiosity, but a lot of them were logged on to bid,” he said.

The sale was broadcast live on Dish Network channel 219, and Lex said 19 phone lines were set up at Little America for buyers to call in and bid. “We had our representatives answering the phones,” he said. Buyers from 13 states participated in the auction.

Lex said he and his staff were very pleased with the sale. “We wanted everything to go off with this first sale professionally and smoothly,” he said. “We want to build on this and offer another choice for the producers in this region.” The next auction, the Oregon Trail Classic, will be held Aug. 12-13 at the Gering Civic Center, Gering, NE. A third auction, the Sandhills Roundup, will be held at Haythorn Land and Cattle Company, Ogallala, NE, on Sept. 16.

“Our goal is to handle good cattle for good people and serve as good representatives,” Lex explained. “We want to keep our buyers happy, and still get the maximum return for our producers.”

After working nearly a year to organize their own video auction, the three principal owners of Cattle Country Video (CCV) were pleasantly surprised at the support they received from both buyers and sellers during their first auction, the High Plains Showcase, held July 1-2 in Cheyenne, WY.

Shawn and Lex Madden and Michael Schmitt are the principal owners of Cattle Country Video Auction, an endeavor they started working on last fall. “We have been in the ownership of two livestock markets for 22 years now,” Lex Madden explained. “We grew up with the salebarn business, and have been involved in video marketing for 19 years. We believe the technology is here, and we needed to offer this as a service to our customers.

“We have many customers who are loyal to the salebarn,” he continued. “We realize the video auction is not for everyone, and the salebarn is not for everyone. Our goal is to offer our customers as many choices as possible. We feel by offering the Cattle Country Video, it broadens our buyers base. We have found new buyers from other states who are interested in the cattle we have here. It has also brought our customer base to other states. We look at the video auction as a compliment to our existing business, not a threat. It is definitely an asset,” Lex said.

Even though they were well-prepared for starting their own video auction company, they were amazed at the support this first auction garnered from buyers and sellers alike. “Actually, we want to sincerely thank our buyers and sellers for their support of this first sale,” Lex said. “We really thought this first video auction would be a one-day sale, and we would have about 25,000 head of cattle. We were pleasantly surprised to have our customers support us with 51,000 head of cattle for this first sale.”

Although the first auction wasn’t without a few minor glitches, Lex said they have received very positive feedback from the buyers and sellers. “We have had buyers call us to say they are just interested in buying cattle from this region,” he explained. The quality of cattle produced in the region is one of the reasons the trio set out to start CCV. “We are very fortunate to have some of the best cattle in the United States, and some of the best genetics,” Lex explained. “We have a lot of repeat buyers that buy our cattle because of the way they perform.”

In fact, Cattle Country Video focuses only on cattle from this region. The cattle marketed through the auction are limited to producers in Montana, Wyoming, South Dakota, Nebraska, Colorado, North Dakota, Kansas and Utah.

Lex said the 51,000 head of cattle sold during the two-day auction made up 300 lots. Of those, 296 lots actually sold during the video auction. He was very pleased that so many cattle were sold. “That is one thing producers like about selling their cattle through a video auction. If they don’t like the price, they can pass them without stressing the cattle or having the expense of trucking and shipping,” he explained.

“We haven’t had too many feeder cattle through the barn during the last few weeks, since most of the cattle are grazing. We thought the market was very strong even though the price of corn on the Chicago Mercantile went up 42 and a half cents the day of and the day prior to the video auction. When corn goes up, then feeders historically go down,” he explained.

During the video auction, Lex said they were surprised how many people came to show support and purchase cattle. The first day, there were nearly 350 people in attendance at the Little America hotel in Cheyenne. During the second day, there were still about 200-250 people. In addition, during the two-day sale, more than 920 people logged on to the auction through cattleusa.com. “Some were logged on just out of curiosity, but a lot of them were logged on to bid,” he said.

The sale was broadcast live on Dish Network channel 219, and Lex said 19 phone lines were set up at Little America for buyers to call in and bid. “We had our representatives answering the phones,” he said. Buyers from 13 states participated in the auction.

Lex said he and his staff were very pleased with the sale. “We wanted everything to go off with this first sale professionally and smoothly,” he said. “We want to build on this and offer another choice for the producers in this region.” The next auction, the Oregon Trail Classic, will be held Aug. 12-13 at the Gering Civic Center, Gering, NE. A third auction, the Sandhills Roundup, will be held at Haythorn Land and Cattle Company, Ogallala, NE, on Sept. 16.

“Our goal is to handle good cattle for good people and serve as good representatives,” Lex explained. “We want to keep our buyers happy, and still get the maximum return for our producers.”

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