Frost-free nose pump lets cattle water themselves | TSLN.com

Frost-free nose pump lets cattle water themselves

Cold weather can present challenges for watering cattle, especially in areas with no electricity for a pump or tank heaters. Jim Anderson from Rimbey, Alberta, solved this problem by creating an innovative water system in which cattle pump water for themselves from shallow wells, ponds or pressure systems – water that never freezes even at 40 degrees below zero.

Anderson’s innovation is a piston pump, like the old-fashioned device in which a person works the handle up and down to lift water.

“We modified this so cattle could use their nose to push a lever. This operates the pump by raising and lowering the piston in the cylinder, the same as a handle used to do,” he explains.

“Like the old-fashioned hand-pump, we have a three-inch cylinder down inside the well. This is how we made it frost-free; we capture geothermal heat from the ground and contain that heat all the way to the surface to keep water in the pipe from freezing,” he says.

The waterer is a small, enclosed basin on the top end of a vertical culvert, with a lever at the back that is pushed by the cow’s nose. The culvert is two feet above ground level, and goes down whatever depth is required to make use of ground water or water from the bottom of a pond or nearby dugout.

Water from a pond is piped horizontally underground to the bottom of the culvert, where it rises to the level of the pond surface – but will not freeze. A buried collection tank from a spring works, too.

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A regular well can be used as long as the water comes up to within 50 feet (preferably 30 feet or less) from the surface. The nose pump can be adapted for an existing well if it meets these criteria. On a drilled well, each nose pump requires about two gallons per minute to water a large herd.

“Some ranchers use big pipes, but the typical installation is a road culvert at least 24 inches in diameter, set in the ground at least 20 feet. The two factors that determine how much geothermal heat you’ll gain is how deep you go and the diameter of the pipe. The bigger the pipe, the more opportunity for heat to rise to keep the water pipe in the center warm enough,” explains Anderson.

Cold weather can present challenges for watering cattle, especially in areas with no electricity for a pump or tank heaters. Jim Anderson from Rimbey, Alberta, solved this problem by creating an innovative water system in which cattle pump water for themselves from shallow wells, ponds or pressure systems – water that never freezes even at 40 degrees below zero.

Anderson’s innovation is a piston pump, like the old-fashioned device in which a person works the handle up and down to lift water.

“We modified this so cattle could use their nose to push a lever. This operates the pump by raising and lowering the piston in the cylinder, the same as a handle used to do,” he explains.

“Like the old-fashioned hand-pump, we have a three-inch cylinder down inside the well. This is how we made it frost-free; we capture geothermal heat from the ground and contain that heat all the way to the surface to keep water in the pipe from freezing,” he says.

The waterer is a small, enclosed basin on the top end of a vertical culvert, with a lever at the back that is pushed by the cow’s nose. The culvert is two feet above ground level, and goes down whatever depth is required to make use of ground water or water from the bottom of a pond or nearby dugout.

Water from a pond is piped horizontally underground to the bottom of the culvert, where it rises to the level of the pond surface – but will not freeze. A buried collection tank from a spring works, too.

A regular well can be used as long as the water comes up to within 50 feet (preferably 30 feet or less) from the surface. The nose pump can be adapted for an existing well if it meets these criteria. On a drilled well, each nose pump requires about two gallons per minute to water a large herd.

“Some ranchers use big pipes, but the typical installation is a road culvert at least 24 inches in diameter, set in the ground at least 20 feet. The two factors that determine how much geothermal heat you’ll gain is how deep you go and the diameter of the pipe. The bigger the pipe, the more opportunity for heat to rise to keep the water pipe in the center warm enough,” explains Anderson.

Cold weather can present challenges for watering cattle, especially in areas with no electricity for a pump or tank heaters. Jim Anderson from Rimbey, Alberta, solved this problem by creating an innovative water system in which cattle pump water for themselves from shallow wells, ponds or pressure systems – water that never freezes even at 40 degrees below zero.

Anderson’s innovation is a piston pump, like the old-fashioned device in which a person works the handle up and down to lift water.

“We modified this so cattle could use their nose to push a lever. This operates the pump by raising and lowering the piston in the cylinder, the same as a handle used to do,” he explains.

“Like the old-fashioned hand-pump, we have a three-inch cylinder down inside the well. This is how we made it frost-free; we capture geothermal heat from the ground and contain that heat all the way to the surface to keep water in the pipe from freezing,” he says.

The waterer is a small, enclosed basin on the top end of a vertical culvert, with a lever at the back that is pushed by the cow’s nose. The culvert is two feet above ground level, and goes down whatever depth is required to make use of ground water or water from the bottom of a pond or nearby dugout.

Water from a pond is piped horizontally underground to the bottom of the culvert, where it rises to the level of the pond surface – but will not freeze. A buried collection tank from a spring works, too.

A regular well can be used as long as the water comes up to within 50 feet (preferably 30 feet or less) from the surface. The nose pump can be adapted for an existing well if it meets these criteria. On a drilled well, each nose pump requires about two gallons per minute to water a large herd.

“Some ranchers use big pipes, but the typical installation is a road culvert at least 24 inches in diameter, set in the ground at least 20 feet. The two factors that determine how much geothermal heat you’ll gain is how deep you go and the diameter of the pipe. The bigger the pipe, the more opportunity for heat to rise to keep the water pipe in the center warm enough,” explains Anderson.

Cold weather can present challenges for watering cattle, especially in areas with no electricity for a pump or tank heaters. Jim Anderson from Rimbey, Alberta, solved this problem by creating an innovative water system in which cattle pump water for themselves from shallow wells, ponds or pressure systems – water that never freezes even at 40 degrees below zero.

Anderson’s innovation is a piston pump, like the old-fashioned device in which a person works the handle up and down to lift water.

“We modified this so cattle could use their nose to push a lever. This operates the pump by raising and lowering the piston in the cylinder, the same as a handle used to do,” he explains.

“Like the old-fashioned hand-pump, we have a three-inch cylinder down inside the well. This is how we made it frost-free; we capture geothermal heat from the ground and contain that heat all the way to the surface to keep water in the pipe from freezing,” he says.

The waterer is a small, enclosed basin on the top end of a vertical culvert, with a lever at the back that is pushed by the cow’s nose. The culvert is two feet above ground level, and goes down whatever depth is required to make use of ground water or water from the bottom of a pond or nearby dugout.

Water from a pond is piped horizontally underground to the bottom of the culvert, where it rises to the level of the pond surface – but will not freeze. A buried collection tank from a spring works, too.

A regular well can be used as long as the water comes up to within 50 feet (preferably 30 feet or less) from the surface. The nose pump can be adapted for an existing well if it meets these criteria. On a drilled well, each nose pump requires about two gallons per minute to water a large herd.

“Some ranchers use big pipes, but the typical installation is a road culvert at least 24 inches in diameter, set in the ground at least 20 feet. The two factors that determine how much geothermal heat you’ll gain is how deep you go and the diameter of the pipe. The bigger the pipe, the more opportunity for heat to rise to keep the water pipe in the center warm enough,” explains Anderson.

Cold weather can present challenges for watering cattle, especially in areas with no electricity for a pump or tank heaters. Jim Anderson from Rimbey, Alberta, solved this problem by creating an innovative water system in which cattle pump water for themselves from shallow wells, ponds or pressure systems – water that never freezes even at 40 degrees below zero.

Anderson’s innovation is a piston pump, like the old-fashioned device in which a person works the handle up and down to lift water.

“We modified this so cattle could use their nose to push a lever. This operates the pump by raising and lowering the piston in the cylinder, the same as a handle used to do,” he explains.

“Like the old-fashioned hand-pump, we have a three-inch cylinder down inside the well. This is how we made it frost-free; we capture geothermal heat from the ground and contain that heat all the way to the surface to keep water in the pipe from freezing,” he says.

The waterer is a small, enclosed basin on the top end of a vertical culvert, with a lever at the back that is pushed by the cow’s nose. The culvert is two feet above ground level, and goes down whatever depth is required to make use of ground water or water from the bottom of a pond or nearby dugout.

Water from a pond is piped horizontally underground to the bottom of the culvert, where it rises to the level of the pond surface – but will not freeze. A buried collection tank from a spring works, too.

A regular well can be used as long as the water comes up to within 50 feet (preferably 30 feet or less) from the surface. The nose pump can be adapted for an existing well if it meets these criteria. On a drilled well, each nose pump requires about two gallons per minute to water a large herd.

“Some ranchers use big pipes, but the typical installation is a road culvert at least 24 inches in diameter, set in the ground at least 20 feet. The two factors that determine how much geothermal heat you’ll gain is how deep you go and the diameter of the pipe. The bigger the pipe, the more opportunity for heat to rise to keep the water pipe in the center warm enough,” explains Anderson.

Cold weather can present challenges for watering cattle, especially in areas with no electricity for a pump or tank heaters. Jim Anderson from Rimbey, Alberta, solved this problem by creating an innovative water system in which cattle pump water for themselves from shallow wells, ponds or pressure systems – water that never freezes even at 40 degrees below zero.

Anderson’s innovation is a piston pump, like the old-fashioned device in which a person works the handle up and down to lift water.

“We modified this so cattle could use their nose to push a lever. This operates the pump by raising and lowering the piston in the cylinder, the same as a handle used to do,” he explains.

“Like the old-fashioned hand-pump, we have a three-inch cylinder down inside the well. This is how we made it frost-free; we capture geothermal heat from the ground and contain that heat all the way to the surface to keep water in the pipe from freezing,” he says.

The waterer is a small, enclosed basin on the top end of a vertical culvert, with a lever at the back that is pushed by the cow’s nose. The culvert is two feet above ground level, and goes down whatever depth is required to make use of ground water or water from the bottom of a pond or nearby dugout.

Water from a pond is piped horizontally underground to the bottom of the culvert, where it rises to the level of the pond surface – but will not freeze. A buried collection tank from a spring works, too.

A regular well can be used as long as the water comes up to within 50 feet (preferably 30 feet or less) from the surface. The nose pump can be adapted for an existing well if it meets these criteria. On a drilled well, each nose pump requires about two gallons per minute to water a large herd.

“Some ranchers use big pipes, but the typical installation is a road culvert at least 24 inches in diameter, set in the ground at least 20 feet. The two factors that determine how much geothermal heat you’ll gain is how deep you go and the diameter of the pipe. The bigger the pipe, the more opportunity for heat to rise to keep the water pipe in the center warm enough,” explains Anderson.

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