Gary Brester: High prices relating to corn, feeder calves, fat cattle and meat markets | TSLN.com

Gary Brester: High prices relating to corn, feeder calves, fat cattle and meat markets

Escalating input costs are certainly a concern for anyone in the ranching business. With the high spike in corn prices, cattle feeders are speculating how long it will last, ways to offset those costs, what to pay for calves and how much consumers will be willing to give to keep beef at the center of the dinner plate.

Of course, if the answers were easy and obvious, everyone would be in the cattle business. Gary Brester, professor of agriculture economics at Montana State University (MSU), offered some insights into the questions so many producers are asking right now.

Escalating input costs are certainly a concern for anyone in the ranching business. With the high spike in corn prices, cattle feeders are speculating how long it will last, ways to offset those costs, what to pay for calves and how much consumers will be willing to give to keep beef at the center of the dinner plate.

Of course, if the answers were easy and obvious, everyone would be in the cattle business. Gary Brester, professor of agriculture economics at Montana State University (MSU), offered some insights into the questions so many producers are asking right now.

Escalating input costs are certainly a concern for anyone in the ranching business. With the high spike in corn prices, cattle feeders are speculating how long it will last, ways to offset those costs, what to pay for calves and how much consumers will be willing to give to keep beef at the center of the dinner plate.

Of course, if the answers were easy and obvious, everyone would be in the cattle business. Gary Brester, professor of agriculture economics at Montana State University (MSU), offered some insights into the questions so many producers are asking right now.

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Escalating input costs are certainly a concern for anyone in the ranching business. With the high spike in corn prices, cattle feeders are speculating how long it will last, ways to offset those costs, what to pay for calves and how much consumers will be willing to give to keep beef at the center of the dinner plate.

Of course, if the answers were easy and obvious, everyone would be in the cattle business. Gary Brester, professor of agriculture economics at Montana State University (MSU), offered some insights into the questions so many producers are asking right now.

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