Gary Sides: Where would agriculture be without technology? | TSLN.com

Gary Sides: Where would agriculture be without technology?

Halfway across the world, a Chinese farmer waters his corn crop by hand. A Peruvian woman carries her day’s worth of water from a well miles away. An African man protects the family goat, for it provides his wife and children with nourishment from its milk.

No matter what point on the globe farmers and ranchers call home, “There is no culture without agriculture,” said Gary Sides, beef and feedlot nutritionist with Pfizer Animal Health. Looking at American agriculture, where would producers be without technology?

“Barb wire was the first piece of technology in the cattle industry,” said Sides. “In the last 50 years, beef production has doubled. One out of six jobs in the U.S. are in the agriculture industry today.”

In his presentation given at the South Dakota Food Chain Roundtable on Nov. 17, 2010 in Sioux Falls, SD, Sides shared facts and figures to debunk the many myths about beef production and bring to light some issues consumers and producers should pay more attention to.

Halfway across the world, a Chinese farmer waters his corn crop by hand. A Peruvian woman carries her day’s worth of water from a well miles away. An African man protects the family goat, for it provides his wife and children with nourishment from its milk.

No matter what point on the globe farmers and ranchers call home, “There is no culture without agriculture,” said Gary Sides, beef and feedlot nutritionist with Pfizer Animal Health. Looking at American agriculture, where would producers be without technology?

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“Barb wire was the first piece of technology in the cattle industry,” said Sides. “In the last 50 years, beef production has doubled. One out of six jobs in the U.S. are in the agriculture industry today.”

In his presentation given at the South Dakota Food Chain Roundtable on Nov. 17, 2010 in Sioux Falls, SD, Sides shared facts and figures to debunk the many myths about beef production and bring to light some issues consumers and producers should pay more attention to.

Halfway across the world, a Chinese farmer waters his corn crop by hand. A Peruvian woman carries her day’s worth of water from a well miles away. An African man protects the family goat, for it provides his wife and children with nourishment from its milk.

No matter what point on the globe farmers and ranchers call home, “There is no culture without agriculture,” said Gary Sides, beef and feedlot nutritionist with Pfizer Animal Health. Looking at American agriculture, where would producers be without technology?

“Barb wire was the first piece of technology in the cattle industry,” said Sides. “In the last 50 years, beef production has doubled. One out of six jobs in the U.S. are in the agriculture industry today.”

In his presentation given at the South Dakota Food Chain Roundtable on Nov. 17, 2010 in Sioux Falls, SD, Sides shared facts and figures to debunk the many myths about beef production and bring to light some issues consumers and producers should pay more attention to.

Halfway across the world, a Chinese farmer waters his corn crop by hand. A Peruvian woman carries her day’s worth of water from a well miles away. An African man protects the family goat, for it provides his wife and children with nourishment from its milk.

No matter what point on the globe farmers and ranchers call home, “There is no culture without agriculture,” said Gary Sides, beef and feedlot nutritionist with Pfizer Animal Health. Looking at American agriculture, where would producers be without technology?

“Barb wire was the first piece of technology in the cattle industry,” said Sides. “In the last 50 years, beef production has doubled. One out of six jobs in the U.S. are in the agriculture industry today.”

In his presentation given at the South Dakota Food Chain Roundtable on Nov. 17, 2010 in Sioux Falls, SD, Sides shared facts and figures to debunk the many myths about beef production and bring to light some issues consumers and producers should pay more attention to.

Halfway across the world, a Chinese farmer waters his corn crop by hand. A Peruvian woman carries her day’s worth of water from a well miles away. An African man protects the family goat, for it provides his wife and children with nourishment from its milk.

No matter what point on the globe farmers and ranchers call home, “There is no culture without agriculture,” said Gary Sides, beef and feedlot nutritionist with Pfizer Animal Health. Looking at American agriculture, where would producers be without technology?

“Barb wire was the first piece of technology in the cattle industry,” said Sides. “In the last 50 years, beef production has doubled. One out of six jobs in the U.S. are in the agriculture industry today.”

In his presentation given at the South Dakota Food Chain Roundtable on Nov. 17, 2010 in Sioux Falls, SD, Sides shared facts and figures to debunk the many myths about beef production and bring to light some issues consumers and producers should pay more attention to.

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