Get the most out of prevented planting acres | TSLN.com

Get the most out of prevented planting acres

Wet conditions this spring mean many producers weren’t able to plant a cash crop.

Many of these fields will qualify for the Preventive Planting Program, and producers will plant a crop to cover the soil. However, this crop cannot be harvested, manipulated or grazed until after Nov. 1 or producers will see a substantial loss in their prevented plant indemnity payment.

“They do have some options for using these lands to create a cost-effective forage mixture that ranchers can use to graze livestock after Nov. 1 while providing a cover crop that will improve organic matter, increase water-holding capacity and add nitrogen to the soil profile,” said Kevin Sedivec, North Dakota State University Extension Service rangeland specialist.

Studies in North Dakota have shown great potential for late-season grazing using selected annual forages seeded in early to mid-July. Forage mixtures with brassicas (turnip, radish, rape, canola) and cool-season cereal grains (oats, barley, triticale, rye, wheat) provide high-quality feed that retains palatability and quality through mid-December. Research from NDSU’s Central Grasslands Research Extension Center has shown nonlactating cows grazing these types of forages gain 1.5 to 2.5 pounds per day in November and early December, depending on weather conditions.

The most cost-effective, high-forage-producing mixture for late-season grazing appears to be a seed mixture of “Pasja” turnip, oilseed radish, conventional oats and foxtail millet. Sedivec recommends a mixture of 0.75 pound of turnip, 1 pound of radish, 15 pounds of oats and 4 pounds of foxtail millet. The turnip, radish and oats provide a high-quality, low-fiber feed, while the foxtail millet provides a fiber source for proper rumen function.

Wet conditions this spring mean many producers weren’t able to plant a cash crop.

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Many of these fields will qualify for the Preventive Planting Program, and producers will plant a crop to cover the soil. However, this crop cannot be harvested, manipulated or grazed until after Nov. 1 or producers will see a substantial loss in their prevented plant indemnity payment.

“They do have some options for using these lands to create a cost-effective forage mixture that ranchers can use to graze livestock after Nov. 1 while providing a cover crop that will improve organic matter, increase water-holding capacity and add nitrogen to the soil profile,” said Kevin Sedivec, North Dakota State University Extension Service rangeland specialist.

Studies in North Dakota have shown great potential for late-season grazing using selected annual forages seeded in early to mid-July. Forage mixtures with brassicas (turnip, radish, rape, canola) and cool-season cereal grains (oats, barley, triticale, rye, wheat) provide high-quality feed that retains palatability and quality through mid-December. Research from NDSU’s Central Grasslands Research Extension Center has shown nonlactating cows grazing these types of forages gain 1.5 to 2.5 pounds per day in November and early December, depending on weather conditions.

The most cost-effective, high-forage-producing mixture for late-season grazing appears to be a seed mixture of “Pasja” turnip, oilseed radish, conventional oats and foxtail millet. Sedivec recommends a mixture of 0.75 pound of turnip, 1 pound of radish, 15 pounds of oats and 4 pounds of foxtail millet. The turnip, radish and oats provide a high-quality, low-fiber feed, while the foxtail millet provides a fiber source for proper rumen function.

Wet conditions this spring mean many producers weren’t able to plant a cash crop.

Many of these fields will qualify for the Preventive Planting Program, and producers will plant a crop to cover the soil. However, this crop cannot be harvested, manipulated or grazed until after Nov. 1 or producers will see a substantial loss in their prevented plant indemnity payment.

“They do have some options for using these lands to create a cost-effective forage mixture that ranchers can use to graze livestock after Nov. 1 while providing a cover crop that will improve organic matter, increase water-holding capacity and add nitrogen to the soil profile,” said Kevin Sedivec, North Dakota State University Extension Service rangeland specialist.

Studies in North Dakota have shown great potential for late-season grazing using selected annual forages seeded in early to mid-July. Forage mixtures with brassicas (turnip, radish, rape, canola) and cool-season cereal grains (oats, barley, triticale, rye, wheat) provide high-quality feed that retains palatability and quality through mid-December. Research from NDSU’s Central Grasslands Research Extension Center has shown nonlactating cows grazing these types of forages gain 1.5 to 2.5 pounds per day in November and early December, depending on weather conditions.

The most cost-effective, high-forage-producing mixture for late-season grazing appears to be a seed mixture of “Pasja” turnip, oilseed radish, conventional oats and foxtail millet. Sedivec recommends a mixture of 0.75 pound of turnip, 1 pound of radish, 15 pounds of oats and 4 pounds of foxtail millet. The turnip, radish and oats provide a high-quality, low-fiber feed, while the foxtail millet provides a fiber source for proper rumen function.

Wet conditions this spring mean many producers weren’t able to plant a cash crop.

Many of these fields will qualify for the Preventive Planting Program, and producers will plant a crop to cover the soil. However, this crop cannot be harvested, manipulated or grazed until after Nov. 1 or producers will see a substantial loss in their prevented plant indemnity payment.

“They do have some options for using these lands to create a cost-effective forage mixture that ranchers can use to graze livestock after Nov. 1 while providing a cover crop that will improve organic matter, increase water-holding capacity and add nitrogen to the soil profile,” said Kevin Sedivec, North Dakota State University Extension Service rangeland specialist.

Studies in North Dakota have shown great potential for late-season grazing using selected annual forages seeded in early to mid-July. Forage mixtures with brassicas (turnip, radish, rape, canola) and cool-season cereal grains (oats, barley, triticale, rye, wheat) provide high-quality feed that retains palatability and quality through mid-December. Research from NDSU’s Central Grasslands Research Extension Center has shown nonlactating cows grazing these types of forages gain 1.5 to 2.5 pounds per day in November and early December, depending on weather conditions.

The most cost-effective, high-forage-producing mixture for late-season grazing appears to be a seed mixture of “Pasja” turnip, oilseed radish, conventional oats and foxtail millet. Sedivec recommends a mixture of 0.75 pound of turnip, 1 pound of radish, 15 pounds of oats and 4 pounds of foxtail millet. The turnip, radish and oats provide a high-quality, low-fiber feed, while the foxtail millet provides a fiber source for proper rumen function.

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