Grazing on public lands threatened, NCBA says | TSLN.com

Grazing on public lands threatened, NCBA says

The livestock industry could be severely damaged, NCBA said last week, due to a recent settlement agreement between El Paso Corp., a major energy company, and two environmental activist groups, the Western Watersheds Project and the Oregon Natural Dessert Association. The agreement seeks, in part, to create “unprecedented” federal legislation to allow for the buyout and retirement of federal grazing permits. That would threaten, NCBA said, ranchers’ grazing rights across vast portions of the west. Ranchers with grazing permits account for more than half of all commercial beef cattle in the west, NCBA noted.

Skye Krebbs, president of NCBA’s Public Lands Council, said “It’s unacceptable for El Paso to use any funding for the purpose of eliminating ranchers’ ability to graze on public lands. Energy development and livestock grazing are necessary and integral parts of rural western economies, and our industries have had a longstanding history of working together.”

PLC and NCBA leadership met with El Paso Corp. last week to express opposition to the portion of the agreement dealing with grazing permit buyout and retirement. El Paso has agreed to respond by Aug. 5.

The livestock industry could be severely damaged, NCBA said last week, due to a recent settlement agreement between El Paso Corp., a major energy company, and two environmental activist groups, the Western Watersheds Project and the Oregon Natural Dessert Association. The agreement seeks, in part, to create “unprecedented” federal legislation to allow for the buyout and retirement of federal grazing permits. That would threaten, NCBA said, ranchers’ grazing rights across vast portions of the west. Ranchers with grazing permits account for more than half of all commercial beef cattle in the west, NCBA noted.

Skye Krebbs, president of NCBA’s Public Lands Council, said “It’s unacceptable for El Paso to use any funding for the purpose of eliminating ranchers’ ability to graze on public lands. Energy development and livestock grazing are necessary and integral parts of rural western economies, and our industries have had a longstanding history of working together.”

PLC and NCBA leadership met with El Paso Corp. last week to express opposition to the portion of the agreement dealing with grazing permit buyout and retirement. El Paso has agreed to respond by Aug. 5.

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