Green Valley Cattle: Focused on the ‘big picture’ | TSLN.com

Green Valley Cattle: Focused on the ‘big picture’

Gayle Smith

Courtesy photoDennis Garwood says that running a video auction doesn't make the job of marketing cattle any easier - but it does make it less stressful for cattle and crew on sale day.

Rather than focusing on just one or two traits to develop that quality herd of Maine-Anjou cattle that Dennis and Sandra Garwood are so thankful for today, they have opted instead to focus on the big picture.

The Atkinson, NE-couple have raised Maine-Anjou cattle for more than 30 years. “The original purebred Maine-Anjou cattle were red and white and horned,” Dennis recalls. “The cattle we produce today are so far removed from that. Our goal is to raise homozygous black, homozygous solid patterned and homozygous polled cattle that are uniform and consistent,” he explains.

Getting to where he is today hasn’t been an easy task. Dennis’ first interest in Maine-Anjous came from showing the breed as 4-H and FFA projects, and being a part of his family’s commercial operation. After college, Dennis decided to pursue a purebred cattle operation, rather than a commercial one. “I wanted more interaction with people,” Dennis says of his choice. “Besides, I wanted to continue to show them a little bit. Over the years, we have been able to develop friendships working with other seedstock producers, and relationships with people all over the country with cattle being the common denominator.”

Dennis decided to center his operation with Maine-Anjou because he could start with a commercial base. “There have been very few females purchased here. We have raised most of them ourselves,” he says. The family has also raises registered Angus cattle. “We purchased some Angus back in the ’90s. We didn’t purchase many, so we have continued to [artificially inseminate, (AI)], and raise our own replacement females to slowly build our numbers,” he says.

Over the years, Dennis has veered away from showing cattle himself, and became more interested in producing cattle for the commercial rancher, although he still exhibits at the National Western Stock Show. “The commercial cattleman is the bread and butter in the long haul. Purebred breeders can sell amongst themselves, but for cattle to be viable long term, they have to have merit in the commercial sector and offer genetics that improve the commercial cattleman’s herd,” Dennis says. “Even though we have chosen not to show much ourselves, others have shown our cattle and used our genetics quite successfully on a national level, for which we are thankful.”

Rather than focusing on just one or two traits to develop that quality herd of Maine-Anjou cattle that Dennis and Sandra Garwood are so thankful for today, they have opted instead to focus on the big picture.

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The Atkinson, NE-couple have raised Maine-Anjou cattle for more than 30 years. “The original purebred Maine-Anjou cattle were red and white and horned,” Dennis recalls. “The cattle we produce today are so far removed from that. Our goal is to raise homozygous black, homozygous solid patterned and homozygous polled cattle that are uniform and consistent,” he explains.

Getting to where he is today hasn’t been an easy task. Dennis’ first interest in Maine-Anjous came from showing the breed as 4-H and FFA projects, and being a part of his family’s commercial operation. After college, Dennis decided to pursue a purebred cattle operation, rather than a commercial one. “I wanted more interaction with people,” Dennis says of his choice. “Besides, I wanted to continue to show them a little bit. Over the years, we have been able to develop friendships working with other seedstock producers, and relationships with people all over the country with cattle being the common denominator.”

Dennis decided to center his operation with Maine-Anjou because he could start with a commercial base. “There have been very few females purchased here. We have raised most of them ourselves,” he says. The family has also raises registered Angus cattle. “We purchased some Angus back in the ’90s. We didn’t purchase many, so we have continued to [artificially inseminate, (AI)], and raise our own replacement females to slowly build our numbers,” he says.

Over the years, Dennis has veered away from showing cattle himself, and became more interested in producing cattle for the commercial rancher, although he still exhibits at the National Western Stock Show. “The commercial cattleman is the bread and butter in the long haul. Purebred breeders can sell amongst themselves, but for cattle to be viable long term, they have to have merit in the commercial sector and offer genetics that improve the commercial cattleman’s herd,” Dennis says. “Even though we have chosen not to show much ourselves, others have shown our cattle and used our genetics quite successfully on a national level, for which we are thankful.”

Rather than focusing on just one or two traits to develop that quality herd of Maine-Anjou cattle that Dennis and Sandra Garwood are so thankful for today, they have opted instead to focus on the big picture.

The Atkinson, NE-couple have raised Maine-Anjou cattle for more than 30 years. “The original purebred Maine-Anjou cattle were red and white and horned,” Dennis recalls. “The cattle we produce today are so far removed from that. Our goal is to raise homozygous black, homozygous solid patterned and homozygous polled cattle that are uniform and consistent,” he explains.

Getting to where he is today hasn’t been an easy task. Dennis’ first interest in Maine-Anjous came from showing the breed as 4-H and FFA projects, and being a part of his family’s commercial operation. After college, Dennis decided to pursue a purebred cattle operation, rather than a commercial one. “I wanted more interaction with people,” Dennis says of his choice. “Besides, I wanted to continue to show them a little bit. Over the years, we have been able to develop friendships working with other seedstock producers, and relationships with people all over the country with cattle being the common denominator.”

Dennis decided to center his operation with Maine-Anjou because he could start with a commercial base. “There have been very few females purchased here. We have raised most of them ourselves,” he says. The family has also raises registered Angus cattle. “We purchased some Angus back in the ’90s. We didn’t purchase many, so we have continued to [artificially inseminate, (AI)], and raise our own replacement females to slowly build our numbers,” he says.

Over the years, Dennis has veered away from showing cattle himself, and became more interested in producing cattle for the commercial rancher, although he still exhibits at the National Western Stock Show. “The commercial cattleman is the bread and butter in the long haul. Purebred breeders can sell amongst themselves, but for cattle to be viable long term, they have to have merit in the commercial sector and offer genetics that improve the commercial cattleman’s herd,” Dennis says. “Even though we have chosen not to show much ourselves, others have shown our cattle and used our genetics quite successfully on a national level, for which we are thankful.”

Rather than focusing on just one or two traits to develop that quality herd of Maine-Anjou cattle that Dennis and Sandra Garwood are so thankful for today, they have opted instead to focus on the big picture.

The Atkinson, NE-couple have raised Maine-Anjou cattle for more than 30 years. “The original purebred Maine-Anjou cattle were red and white and horned,” Dennis recalls. “The cattle we produce today are so far removed from that. Our goal is to raise homozygous black, homozygous solid patterned and homozygous polled cattle that are uniform and consistent,” he explains.

Getting to where he is today hasn’t been an easy task. Dennis’ first interest in Maine-Anjous came from showing the breed as 4-H and FFA projects, and being a part of his family’s commercial operation. After college, Dennis decided to pursue a purebred cattle operation, rather than a commercial one. “I wanted more interaction with people,” Dennis says of his choice. “Besides, I wanted to continue to show them a little bit. Over the years, we have been able to develop friendships working with other seedstock producers, and relationships with people all over the country with cattle being the common denominator.”

Dennis decided to center his operation with Maine-Anjou because he could start with a commercial base. “There have been very few females purchased here. We have raised most of them ourselves,” he says. The family has also raises registered Angus cattle. “We purchased some Angus back in the ’90s. We didn’t purchase many, so we have continued to [artificially inseminate, (AI)], and raise our own replacement females to slowly build our numbers,” he says.

Over the years, Dennis has veered away from showing cattle himself, and became more interested in producing cattle for the commercial rancher, although he still exhibits at the National Western Stock Show. “The commercial cattleman is the bread and butter in the long haul. Purebred breeders can sell amongst themselves, but for cattle to be viable long term, they have to have merit in the commercial sector and offer genetics that improve the commercial cattleman’s herd,” Dennis says. “Even though we have chosen not to show much ourselves, others have shown our cattle and used our genetics quite successfully on a national level, for which we are thankful.”

editor’s note: to learn more about green valley cattle, visit their web site at greenvalleycattle.com. dennis can be reached at 402-925-2970.

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