Hay quality hurt by storms | TSLN.com

Hay quality hurt by storms

Cheryl Anderson

OMAHA (DTN) – Weather related damage to Midwest alfalfa fields has left a large amount of first-cutting hay suffering quality loss, which could put a serious dent in supplies of dairy quality hay for the coming winter.

Midwest alfalfa stands looked promising until about June 1, when alfalfa producers were challenged by high humidity and frequent rains that delayed haying. Producers who knocked down and baled hay in early to mid-May are generally in good shape, according to Barb Kinnan, executive director of the Nebraska Alfalfa Marketing Association. Those who can’t get hay out of the fields are struggling.

Last week brought some warmer temperatures and winds that dried out some hay. This allowed some farmers to bale a portion of their first cutting, Kinnan said. But many others are finding that either their fields are too wet to get into and bale, or the cut hay is too wet to bale and becoming more damaged as rains continue.

OMAHA (DTN) – Weather related damage to Midwest alfalfa fields has left a large amount of first-cutting hay suffering quality loss, which could put a serious dent in supplies of dairy quality hay for the coming winter.

Midwest alfalfa stands looked promising until about June 1, when alfalfa producers were challenged by high humidity and frequent rains that delayed haying. Producers who knocked down and baled hay in early to mid-May are generally in good shape, according to Barb Kinnan, executive director of the Nebraska Alfalfa Marketing Association. Those who can’t get hay out of the fields are struggling.

Last week brought some warmer temperatures and winds that dried out some hay. This allowed some farmers to bale a portion of their first cutting, Kinnan said. But many others are finding that either their fields are too wet to get into and bale, or the cut hay is too wet to bale and becoming more damaged as rains continue.

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OMAHA (DTN) – Weather related damage to Midwest alfalfa fields has left a large amount of first-cutting hay suffering quality loss, which could put a serious dent in supplies of dairy quality hay for the coming winter.

Midwest alfalfa stands looked promising until about June 1, when alfalfa producers were challenged by high humidity and frequent rains that delayed haying. Producers who knocked down and baled hay in early to mid-May are generally in good shape, according to Barb Kinnan, executive director of the Nebraska Alfalfa Marketing Association. Those who can’t get hay out of the fields are struggling.

Last week brought some warmer temperatures and winds that dried out some hay. This allowed some farmers to bale a portion of their first cutting, Kinnan said. But many others are finding that either their fields are too wet to get into and bale, or the cut hay is too wet to bale and becoming more damaged as rains continue.

OMAHA (DTN) – Weather related damage to Midwest alfalfa fields has left a large amount of first-cutting hay suffering quality loss, which could put a serious dent in supplies of dairy quality hay for the coming winter.

Midwest alfalfa stands looked promising until about June 1, when alfalfa producers were challenged by high humidity and frequent rains that delayed haying. Producers who knocked down and baled hay in early to mid-May are generally in good shape, according to Barb Kinnan, executive director of the Nebraska Alfalfa Marketing Association. Those who can’t get hay out of the fields are struggling.

Last week brought some warmer temperatures and winds that dried out some hay. This allowed some farmers to bale a portion of their first cutting, Kinnan said. But many others are finding that either their fields are too wet to get into and bale, or the cut hay is too wet to bale and becoming more damaged as rains continue.

OMAHA (DTN) – Weather related damage to Midwest alfalfa fields has left a large amount of first-cutting hay suffering quality loss, which could put a serious dent in supplies of dairy quality hay for the coming winter.

Midwest alfalfa stands looked promising until about June 1, when alfalfa producers were challenged by high humidity and frequent rains that delayed haying. Producers who knocked down and baled hay in early to mid-May are generally in good shape, according to Barb Kinnan, executive director of the Nebraska Alfalfa Marketing Association. Those who can’t get hay out of the fields are struggling.

Last week brought some warmer temperatures and winds that dried out some hay. This allowed some farmers to bale a portion of their first cutting, Kinnan said. But many others are finding that either their fields are too wet to get into and bale, or the cut hay is too wet to bale and becoming more damaged as rains continue.

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