Healthy pairs, healthy pocket book | TSLN.com

Healthy pairs, healthy pocket book

Amanda Nolz

Stephanie Stevens, DVM, owner and practitioner of Cheyenne River Animal Hospital in Edgemont, SD.

Animal care and profitability go hand in hand. Healthy calves perform better on pasture, in the feed yards and on the rail. Simply stated, it makes economic sense to maintain optimal health in the cowherd. That may mean providing nutritional supplements or additional antibiotics or vaccines in order to ensure a healthy calf crop. However, problems do arise to even the most proactive producers and a watchful eye to detect early warning signs of illness can save producers from loss down the road.

Stephanie Stevens, DVM, owner and practitioner of Cheyenne River Animal Hospital (CRAH) in Edgemont, SD, offers her insights from the field in avoiding common illnesses while maintaining optimal health in the cowherd.

Animal care and profitability go hand in hand. Healthy calves perform better on pasture, in the feed yards and on the rail. Simply stated, it makes economic sense to maintain optimal health in the cowherd. That may mean providing nutritional supplements or additional antibiotics or vaccines in order to ensure a healthy calf crop. However, problems do arise to even the most proactive producers and a watchful eye to detect early warning signs of illness can save producers from loss down the road.

Stephanie Stevens, DVM, owner and practitioner of Cheyenne River Animal Hospital (CRAH) in Edgemont, SD, offers her insights from the field in avoiding common illnesses while maintaining optimal health in the cowherd.

Animal care and profitability go hand in hand. Healthy calves perform better on pasture, in the feed yards and on the rail. Simply stated, it makes economic sense to maintain optimal health in the cowherd. That may mean providing nutritional supplements or additional antibiotics or vaccines in order to ensure a healthy calf crop. However, problems do arise to even the most proactive producers and a watchful eye to detect early warning signs of illness can save producers from loss down the road.

Stephanie Stevens, DVM, owner and practitioner of Cheyenne River Animal Hospital (CRAH) in Edgemont, SD, offers her insights from the field in avoiding common illnesses while maintaining optimal health in the cowherd.

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Animal care and profitability go hand in hand. Healthy calves perform better on pasture, in the feed yards and on the rail. Simply stated, it makes economic sense to maintain optimal health in the cowherd. That may mean providing nutritional supplements or additional antibiotics or vaccines in order to ensure a healthy calf crop. However, problems do arise to even the most proactive producers and a watchful eye to detect early warning signs of illness can save producers from loss down the road.

Stephanie Stevens, DVM, owner and practitioner of Cheyenne River Animal Hospital (CRAH) in Edgemont, SD, offers her insights from the field in avoiding common illnesses while maintaining optimal health in the cowherd.

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