Heith and Cody DeMoss place 1-2 at National Western Stock Show & Rodeo | TSLN.com

Heith and Cody DeMoss place 1-2 at National Western Stock Show & Rodeo

DENVER – If this keeps up, the DeMoss brothers are going to have to trade in their pickup for a Brinks truck.

The Louisiana saddle bronc riders finished 1-2 in Alexandria, LA, on Friday night and then made the nearly 1,100-mile trek to Denver, where they finished 1-2 again on Sunday in the $516,675 National Western Stock Show & Rodeo.

Whether at sea level and close to home – Alexandria is 119 miles from their front porches in Heflin, LA – or in the thin air of the Rocky Mountains, it made no difference: Younger brother Heith DeMoss won, Cody DeMoss was second, and they took home most of the money.

They were nearly mirror images of each other in the Denver Coliseum. Cody DeMoss won the first round, Heith the second, and they finished just a point apart in the three-head average (252-251). They are now 1-2 in the world standings.

“Well, we came from the same stock,” Heith DeMoss said, “so we should be pretty even.”

Heith DeMoss’ win in Denver earned him $12,310, and he got another $1,018 for the victory in the Amicus Club PRCA Rodeo in Alexandria, while Cody banked a total of $10,808, to bring the brothers’ weekend haul to $24,136.

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Heith is also leading the second round of the ongoing Fort Worth (TX) Stock Show & Rodeo.

“I’ve never been a winter-type guy,” Heith DeMoss said with a laugh. “I don’t function too well in cold weather; that’s why I live in Louisiana. To get it done during my bad time of the year, it’s a great, great feat.

“This kind of rodeo right here (Denver), you dream of winning when you play ‘Rodeo-opoly,’ or whatever, when you were a kid. When you’d be roping the dummy, you’d be playing like, ‘All right, we’re going to Denver,’ or ‘we’re going to Cheyenne. We’re going to Salinas.’ This is one of those rodeos you dream about winning your entire life. It’s a dream come true, and it eases a lot of pain financially. My wife just bought a bunch of furniture that cost so darn much money, so I’m good.”

The only competitor who could claim anything like that sort of dominance was bull rider Shane Proctor, who claimed checks in only one venue over the weekend, but made the most of his time in the Mile High City.

Proctor, of Grand Coulee, WA, won all three rounds of the National Western with scores of 91, 87 and 90 points to finish a convincing 17 points ahead of second-place Clayton Foltyn.

The 268 aggregate points is the highest total in a three-head competition in at least five years. Proctor’s $17,350 in earnings was a rodeo best.

“It gives me a good start to the new year,” Proctor said. “I haven’t gone to a lot of (PRCA winter) rodeos in the past, and this is a really good way to start the season and progress to the NFR. I did 42 rodeos in three months last year (a total of 47 for the year), and I finished about eight places out of the NFR.”

The feel-good, upset story of the rodeo was supplied by tie-down roper Justin Macha (pronounced Ma-ha), who was the only champion to have emerged from the Jan. 2-4 qualifying event at the Denver Coliseum.

Just to make things a little harder on himself, Macha missed his first calf in the qualifying round and had to come up with an 8.7-second run in the second round to make his way into the field for the main event in Denver.

Macha returned home to Needville, TX, and went back to work as a pecan broker. He had more than two weeks before he took his turn roping in the first two rounds of the National Western, stopping the clock in 8.1 and 7.8 seconds, respectively. He arrived at the final Sunday on top of the leader board by more than half a second.

Macha was the final roper to compete in the championship round and made another stellar run at 8.2 seconds to win the rodeo. His total time of 24.1 seconds on three head was the fastest by six-tenths of a second over runner-up Cory Solomon and earned him $11,073.

“My game plan never changes,” Macha said. “As long as I’m winning and can go, I’ll be on the road. Otherwise, I’ll be working. This win will make a big difference.

“I’ve never had a big, big win before. I’d get close and win a little here and there, but I’ve never had a big win to push me through. It’s a big confidence booster. You can feed off that and hopefully have a big winter.”

The other National Western Stock Show & Rodeo champions were bareback riders Will Lowe and Bo Casper (254 points each on three head), steer wrestler Darrell Petry (13.4 seconds on three head), team ropers Clay Tryan and Travis Graves (15.6 seconds on three head), and barrel racer Susan Kay Smith (45.66 seconds on three runs). Smith edged Brenda Mays by one-hundredth of a second, and Mattie Little-Jackson was third, another one-hundredth of a second back.

DENVER – If this keeps up, the DeMoss brothers are going to have to trade in their pickup for a Brinks truck.

The Louisiana saddle bronc riders finished 1-2 in Alexandria, LA, on Friday night and then made the nearly 1,100-mile trek to Denver, where they finished 1-2 again on Sunday in the $516,675 National Western Stock Show & Rodeo.

Whether at sea level and close to home – Alexandria is 119 miles from their front porches in Heflin, LA – or in the thin air of the Rocky Mountains, it made no difference: Younger brother Heith DeMoss won, Cody DeMoss was second, and they took home most of the money.

They were nearly mirror images of each other in the Denver Coliseum. Cody DeMoss won the first round, Heith the second, and they finished just a point apart in the three-head average (252-251). They are now 1-2 in the world standings.

“Well, we came from the same stock,” Heith DeMoss said, “so we should be pretty even.”

Heith DeMoss’ win in Denver earned him $12,310, and he got another $1,018 for the victory in the Amicus Club PRCA Rodeo in Alexandria, while Cody banked a total of $10,808, to bring the brothers’ weekend haul to $24,136.

Heith is also leading the second round of the ongoing Fort Worth (TX) Stock Show & Rodeo.

“I’ve never been a winter-type guy,” Heith DeMoss said with a laugh. “I don’t function too well in cold weather; that’s why I live in Louisiana. To get it done during my bad time of the year, it’s a great, great feat.

“This kind of rodeo right here (Denver), you dream of winning when you play ‘Rodeo-opoly,’ or whatever, when you were a kid. When you’d be roping the dummy, you’d be playing like, ‘All right, we’re going to Denver,’ or ‘we’re going to Cheyenne. We’re going to Salinas.’ This is one of those rodeos you dream about winning your entire life. It’s a dream come true, and it eases a lot of pain financially. My wife just bought a bunch of furniture that cost so darn much money, so I’m good.”

The only competitor who could claim anything like that sort of dominance was bull rider Shane Proctor, who claimed checks in only one venue over the weekend, but made the most of his time in the Mile High City.

Proctor, of Grand Coulee, WA, won all three rounds of the National Western with scores of 91, 87 and 90 points to finish a convincing 17 points ahead of second-place Clayton Foltyn.

The 268 aggregate points is the highest total in a three-head competition in at least five years. Proctor’s $17,350 in earnings was a rodeo best.

“It gives me a good start to the new year,” Proctor said. “I haven’t gone to a lot of (PRCA winter) rodeos in the past, and this is a really good way to start the season and progress to the NFR. I did 42 rodeos in three months last year (a total of 47 for the year), and I finished about eight places out of the NFR.”

The feel-good, upset story of the rodeo was supplied by tie-down roper Justin Macha (pronounced Ma-ha), who was the only champion to have emerged from the Jan. 2-4 qualifying event at the Denver Coliseum.

Just to make things a little harder on himself, Macha missed his first calf in the qualifying round and had to come up with an 8.7-second run in the second round to make his way into the field for the main event in Denver.

Macha returned home to Needville, TX, and went back to work as a pecan broker. He had more than two weeks before he took his turn roping in the first two rounds of the National Western, stopping the clock in 8.1 and 7.8 seconds, respectively. He arrived at the final Sunday on top of the leader board by more than half a second.

Macha was the final roper to compete in the championship round and made another stellar run at 8.2 seconds to win the rodeo. His total time of 24.1 seconds on three head was the fastest by six-tenths of a second over runner-up Cory Solomon and earned him $11,073.

“My game plan never changes,” Macha said. “As long as I’m winning and can go, I’ll be on the road. Otherwise, I’ll be working. This win will make a big difference.

“I’ve never had a big, big win before. I’d get close and win a little here and there, but I’ve never had a big win to push me through. It’s a big confidence booster. You can feed off that and hopefully have a big winter.”

The other National Western Stock Show & Rodeo champions were bareback riders Will Lowe and Bo Casper (254 points each on three head), steer wrestler Darrell Petry (13.4 seconds on three head), team ropers Clay Tryan and Travis Graves (15.6 seconds on three head), and barrel racer Susan Kay Smith (45.66 seconds on three runs). Smith edged Brenda Mays by one-hundredth of a second, and Mattie Little-Jackson was third, another one-hundredth of a second back.

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