Horizon Quarter Horses: Utilizing Poco Bueno bloodlines in their program | TSLN.com

Horizon Quarter Horses: Utilizing Poco Bueno bloodlines in their program

Gayle Smith

When Dr. Charles and Dr. Deborah Skow of Keenesburg, CO, decided to develop a Quarter Horse breeding program, they tried several different bloodlines, but always came back to one horse they both admired.

“Initially, we owned horses with a variety of bloodlines, but what we found is they didn’t provide what we were looking for as far as disposition or cow sense,” Deborah explains. “We both admired Poco Bueno for his strong, bulldog-like conformation, cow sense and athletic ability. We agreed that he and his sire, King, were arguably one of AQHA’s most well-known and influential father-son teams.”

Once the couple decided to focus on a Poco Bueno foundation for their breeding program, the challenge was finding offspring they could purchase. “Poco Bueno sired only 405 registered foals,” Deborah says. “He was alive during an era before [artificial insemination] and shipped semen were available. We have always been impressed that his bloodlines continue to influence the modern performance Quarter Horse over 40 years after his death. With Poco Bueno’s stud fee of $5,000 during the 1940s, it is likely that only the very best mares were brought to him, making those daughters and granddaughters very valuable as bloodstock.”

They were fortunate to have a mentor, Roy Yates, encourage them to purchase as many Poco Bueno granddaughters as they could afford. The search led the couple to the legendary Frank Perkins Ranch in Tyler, TX, where Perkins has bred Poco Bueno horses for over 40 years.

“His linebreeding program has produced some of the highest percentages of Poco Bueno blood in America,” Deborah says. With Perkins’ help, the couple was able to purchase many double-bred Poco Bueno granddaughters that have become the backbone of their breeding program. Since they started in 1984, they have acquired mares and stallions whose pedigrees represent up to 18 different sons and daughters of Poco Bueno.

One of those Poco Bueno stallion standouts is Little Blue Bueno, a grullo double-bred grandson, who is 40 percent related in blood to Poco Bueno. The stallion is the foundation of the couple’s Poco Bueno program.

Recommended Stories For You

“Little Blue Bueno’s son, Pistolera Poco, is following in his sire’s footsteps as a great producer,” Deborah adds. “Another stallion, Poco Stripe Jr, a great grandson of Poco Bueno through Poco Tivio, has also been a great asset to our program, producing foals with exceptionally kind dispositions.”

When Dr. Charles and Dr. Deborah Skow of Keenesburg, CO, decided to develop a Quarter Horse breeding program, they tried several different bloodlines, but always came back to one horse they both admired.

“Initially, we owned horses with a variety of bloodlines, but what we found is they didn’t provide what we were looking for as far as disposition or cow sense,” Deborah explains. “We both admired Poco Bueno for his strong, bulldog-like conformation, cow sense and athletic ability. We agreed that he and his sire, King, were arguably one of AQHA’s most well-known and influential father-son teams.”

Once the couple decided to focus on a Poco Bueno foundation for their breeding program, the challenge was finding offspring they could purchase. “Poco Bueno sired only 405 registered foals,” Deborah says. “He was alive during an era before [artificial insemination] and shipped semen were available. We have always been impressed that his bloodlines continue to influence the modern performance Quarter Horse over 40 years after his death. With Poco Bueno’s stud fee of $5,000 during the 1940s, it is likely that only the very best mares were brought to him, making those daughters and granddaughters very valuable as bloodstock.”

They were fortunate to have a mentor, Roy Yates, encourage them to purchase as many Poco Bueno granddaughters as they could afford. The search led the couple to the legendary Frank Perkins Ranch in Tyler, TX, where Perkins has bred Poco Bueno horses for over 40 years.

“His linebreeding program has produced some of the highest percentages of Poco Bueno blood in America,” Deborah says. With Perkins’ help, the couple was able to purchase many double-bred Poco Bueno granddaughters that have become the backbone of their breeding program. Since they started in 1984, they have acquired mares and stallions whose pedigrees represent up to 18 different sons and daughters of Poco Bueno.

One of those Poco Bueno stallion standouts is Little Blue Bueno, a grullo double-bred grandson, who is 40 percent related in blood to Poco Bueno. The stallion is the foundation of the couple’s Poco Bueno program.

“Little Blue Bueno’s son, Pistolera Poco, is following in his sire’s footsteps as a great producer,” Deborah adds. “Another stallion, Poco Stripe Jr, a great grandson of Poco Bueno through Poco Tivio, has also been a great asset to our program, producing foals with exceptionally kind dispositions.”

When Dr. Charles and Dr. Deborah Skow of Keenesburg, CO, decided to develop a Quarter Horse breeding program, they tried several different bloodlines, but always came back to one horse they both admired.

“Initially, we owned horses with a variety of bloodlines, but what we found is they didn’t provide what we were looking for as far as disposition or cow sense,” Deborah explains. “We both admired Poco Bueno for his strong, bulldog-like conformation, cow sense and athletic ability. We agreed that he and his sire, King, were arguably one of AQHA’s most well-known and influential father-son teams.”

Once the couple decided to focus on a Poco Bueno foundation for their breeding program, the challenge was finding offspring they could purchase. “Poco Bueno sired only 405 registered foals,” Deborah says. “He was alive during an era before [artificial insemination] and shipped semen were available. We have always been impressed that his bloodlines continue to influence the modern performance Quarter Horse over 40 years after his death. With Poco Bueno’s stud fee of $5,000 during the 1940s, it is likely that only the very best mares were brought to him, making those daughters and granddaughters very valuable as bloodstock.”

They were fortunate to have a mentor, Roy Yates, encourage them to purchase as many Poco Bueno granddaughters as they could afford. The search led the couple to the legendary Frank Perkins Ranch in Tyler, TX, where Perkins has bred Poco Bueno horses for over 40 years.

“His linebreeding program has produced some of the highest percentages of Poco Bueno blood in America,” Deborah says. With Perkins’ help, the couple was able to purchase many double-bred Poco Bueno granddaughters that have become the backbone of their breeding program. Since they started in 1984, they have acquired mares and stallions whose pedigrees represent up to 18 different sons and daughters of Poco Bueno.

One of those Poco Bueno stallion standouts is Little Blue Bueno, a grullo double-bred grandson, who is 40 percent related in blood to Poco Bueno. The stallion is the foundation of the couple’s Poco Bueno program.

“Little Blue Bueno’s son, Pistolera Poco, is following in his sire’s footsteps as a great producer,” Deborah adds. “Another stallion, Poco Stripe Jr, a great grandson of Poco Bueno through Poco Tivio, has also been a great asset to our program, producing foals with exceptionally kind dispositions.”

When Dr. Charles and Dr. Deborah Skow of Keenesburg, CO, decided to develop a Quarter Horse breeding program, they tried several different bloodlines, but always came back to one horse they both admired.

“Initially, we owned horses with a variety of bloodlines, but what we found is they didn’t provide what we were looking for as far as disposition or cow sense,” Deborah explains. “We both admired Poco Bueno for his strong, bulldog-like conformation, cow sense and athletic ability. We agreed that he and his sire, King, were arguably one of AQHA’s most well-known and influential father-son teams.”

Once the couple decided to focus on a Poco Bueno foundation for their breeding program, the challenge was finding offspring they could purchase. “Poco Bueno sired only 405 registered foals,” Deborah says. “He was alive during an era before [artificial insemination] and shipped semen were available. We have always been impressed that his bloodlines continue to influence the modern performance Quarter Horse over 40 years after his death. With Poco Bueno’s stud fee of $5,000 during the 1940s, it is likely that only the very best mares were brought to him, making those daughters and granddaughters very valuable as bloodstock.”

They were fortunate to have a mentor, Roy Yates, encourage them to purchase as many Poco Bueno granddaughters as they could afford. The search led the couple to the legendary Frank Perkins Ranch in Tyler, TX, where Perkins has bred Poco Bueno horses for over 40 years.

“His linebreeding program has produced some of the highest percentages of Poco Bueno blood in America,” Deborah says. With Perkins’ help, the couple was able to purchase many double-bred Poco Bueno granddaughters that have become the backbone of their breeding program. Since they started in 1984, they have acquired mares and stallions whose pedigrees represent up to 18 different sons and daughters of Poco Bueno.

One of those Poco Bueno stallion standouts is Little Blue Bueno, a grullo double-bred grandson, who is 40 percent related in blood to Poco Bueno. The stallion is the foundation of the couple’s Poco Bueno program.

“Little Blue Bueno’s son, Pistolera Poco, is following in his sire’s footsteps as a great producer,” Deborah adds. “Another stallion, Poco Stripe Jr, a great grandson of Poco Bueno through Poco Tivio, has also been a great asset to our program, producing foals with exceptionally kind dispositions.”

editor’s note: contact the skows at 303-732-0616 or online at horizonquarterhorses.com.

Go back to article