Hunt Limousin Ranch produces cattle with calving ease, docility and performance | TSLN.com

Hunt Limousin Ranch produces cattle with calving ease, docility and performance

Gayle Smith

Since getting his start in the cattle business in 1960, Charles Hunt has built a quality Limousin and Aubrac seedstock business by developing a consistent product and an honest reputation through intensive management and good recordkeeping.

Nearly 50 years later the Oxford, NE-rancher still stands by his philosophy of treating his customers how he would want to be treated. He’s ingrained the same philosophy in his son, Dan, who is excited about the future of the family operation.

Dan explains that his father successfully built up a herd of 300 black baldy cows after he graduated from college. “He bought his first Limousin bull in 1978, and started developing his own replacement females. His philosophy was the Limousin-cross females needed to out-perform the black baldies in order to remain in the herd,” Dan recalls.

“His herd slowly improved by making sure the replacements he kept were better than the cows already in the herd,” he continues. “He did this by keeping really good records. It is a practice we still use today. We won’t cull any cow in our herd based on age, but we will cull based on performance. We are more concerned with how each individual cow produces, rather than how old they are.”

They also resist creep feeding their calves. “We feel it allows us to see which cows are doing their job, and which ones aren’t,” he says. “We also cull the bottom 15 percent of our herd every year because those are probably the cows that aren’t making us any money. Over the years, it has resulted in a very efficient cow herd that works really well here.”

Since getting his start in the cattle business in 1960, Charles Hunt has built a quality Limousin and Aubrac seedstock business by developing a consistent product and an honest reputation through intensive management and good recordkeeping.

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Nearly 50 years later the Oxford, NE-rancher still stands by his philosophy of treating his customers how he would want to be treated. He’s ingrained the same philosophy in his son, Dan, who is excited about the future of the family operation.

Dan explains that his father successfully built up a herd of 300 black baldy cows after he graduated from college. “He bought his first Limousin bull in 1978, and started developing his own replacement females. His philosophy was the Limousin-cross females needed to out-perform the black baldies in order to remain in the herd,” Dan recalls.

“His herd slowly improved by making sure the replacements he kept were better than the cows already in the herd,” he continues. “He did this by keeping really good records. It is a practice we still use today. We won’t cull any cow in our herd based on age, but we will cull based on performance. We are more concerned with how each individual cow produces, rather than how old they are.”

They also resist creep feeding their calves. “We feel it allows us to see which cows are doing their job, and which ones aren’t,” he says. “We also cull the bottom 15 percent of our herd every year because those are probably the cows that aren’t making us any money. Over the years, it has resulted in a very efficient cow herd that works really well here.”

Since getting his start in the cattle business in 1960, Charles Hunt has built a quality Limousin and Aubrac seedstock business by developing a consistent product and an honest reputation through intensive management and good recordkeeping.

Nearly 50 years later the Oxford, NE-rancher still stands by his philosophy of treating his customers how he would want to be treated. He’s ingrained the same philosophy in his son, Dan, who is excited about the future of the family operation.

Dan explains that his father successfully built up a herd of 300 black baldy cows after he graduated from college. “He bought his first Limousin bull in 1978, and started developing his own replacement females. His philosophy was the Limousin-cross females needed to out-perform the black baldies in order to remain in the herd,” Dan recalls.

“His herd slowly improved by making sure the replacements he kept were better than the cows already in the herd,” he continues. “He did this by keeping really good records. It is a practice we still use today. We won’t cull any cow in our herd based on age, but we will cull based on performance. We are more concerned with how each individual cow produces, rather than how old they are.”

They also resist creep feeding their calves. “We feel it allows us to see which cows are doing their job, and which ones aren’t,” he says. “We also cull the bottom 15 percent of our herd every year because those are probably the cows that aren’t making us any money. Over the years, it has resulted in a very efficient cow herd that works really well here.”

Since getting his start in the cattle business in 1960, Charles Hunt has built a quality Limousin and Aubrac seedstock business by developing a consistent product and an honest reputation through intensive management and good recordkeeping.

Nearly 50 years later the Oxford, NE-rancher still stands by his philosophy of treating his customers how he would want to be treated. He’s ingrained the same philosophy in his son, Dan, who is excited about the future of the family operation.

Dan explains that his father successfully built up a herd of 300 black baldy cows after he graduated from college. “He bought his first Limousin bull in 1978, and started developing his own replacement females. His philosophy was the Limousin-cross females needed to out-perform the black baldies in order to remain in the herd,” Dan recalls.

“His herd slowly improved by making sure the replacements he kept were better than the cows already in the herd,” he continues. “He did this by keeping really good records. It is a practice we still use today. We won’t cull any cow in our herd based on age, but we will cull based on performance. We are more concerned with how each individual cow produces, rather than how old they are.”

They also resist creep feeding their calves. “We feel it allows us to see which cows are doing their job, and which ones aren’t,” he says. “We also cull the bottom 15 percent of our herd every year because those are probably the cows that aren’t making us any money. Over the years, it has resulted in a very efficient cow herd that works really well here.”

Since getting his start in the cattle business in 1960, Charles Hunt has built a quality Limousin and Aubrac seedstock business by developing a consistent product and an honest reputation through intensive management and good recordkeeping.

Nearly 50 years later the Oxford, NE-rancher still stands by his philosophy of treating his customers how he would want to be treated. He’s ingrained the same philosophy in his son, Dan, who is excited about the future of the family operation.

Dan explains that his father successfully built up a herd of 300 black baldy cows after he graduated from college. “He bought his first Limousin bull in 1978, and started developing his own replacement females. His philosophy was the Limousin-cross females needed to out-perform the black baldies in order to remain in the herd,” Dan recalls.

“His herd slowly improved by making sure the replacements he kept were better than the cows already in the herd,” he continues. “He did this by keeping really good records. It is a practice we still use today. We won’t cull any cow in our herd based on age, but we will cull based on performance. We are more concerned with how each individual cow produces, rather than how old they are.”

They also resist creep feeding their calves. “We feel it allows us to see which cows are doing their job, and which ones aren’t,” he says. “We also cull the bottom 15 percent of our herd every year because those are probably the cows that aren’t making us any money. Over the years, it has resulted in a very efficient cow herd that works really well here.”

editor’s note: to learn more about hunt limousin and aubrac, visit huntlimousin.com.

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