Iris scanning technology is a non-invasive method of identification available for horses | TSLN.com

Iris scanning technology is a non-invasive method of identification available for horses

Breed registries, health professionals, equine facilities, events and shows, racetracks and regulatory administrators for tracking movement of horses across state or international borders rely on dependable means of permanent identification. Now there are some secure, yet simple methods of identification – with advantages over traditional methods such as brands, tattoos, or even microchips.

A new system becoming available to professionals and horse owners is iris scan technology, called eyeD. At present, the iris scan is one of the most accurate, reliable, safe and effective existing identification methods for horses. The iris, the colored portion of the eye, is easily seen and photographed.

David Knupp, who works with Global Animal Management, says a specialized camera is held about 14 inches away from the eye. “It takes a few seconds to take pictures of both eyes. The horse doesn’t have to remain perfectly still because we’re taking a video,” he explains.

“The software goes back through the video, frame by frame, and selects an image best suited for the iris mapping process. It grabs that image, which we call an eyePrint, and uses it for the permanent picture,” Knupp says.

“We do this for both eyes when we enroll a horse in the system. That information is transferred to a computer. You plug the camera into your computer. A piece of client software, called eyeSync, must be installed on your computer. It pulls the information off the camera – the picture of the eye and information about the horse – and sends it via Internet to the eyeD processor. It stores the iris images and assigns those images a unique 15 alphanumeric number. That number, the eyeD ID, is associated with that horse’s eye, and becomes the horse’s identification number,” he explains.

Breed registries, health professionals, equine facilities, events and shows, racetracks and regulatory administrators for tracking movement of horses across state or international borders rely on dependable means of permanent identification. Now there are some secure, yet simple methods of identification – with advantages over traditional methods such as brands, tattoos, or even microchips.

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A new system becoming available to professionals and horse owners is iris scan technology, called eyeD. At present, the iris scan is one of the most accurate, reliable, safe and effective existing identification methods for horses. The iris, the colored portion of the eye, is easily seen and photographed.

David Knupp, who works with Global Animal Management, says a specialized camera is held about 14 inches away from the eye. “It takes a few seconds to take pictures of both eyes. The horse doesn’t have to remain perfectly still because we’re taking a video,” he explains.

“The software goes back through the video, frame by frame, and selects an image best suited for the iris mapping process. It grabs that image, which we call an eyePrint, and uses it for the permanent picture,” Knupp says.

“We do this for both eyes when we enroll a horse in the system. That information is transferred to a computer. You plug the camera into your computer. A piece of client software, called eyeSync, must be installed on your computer. It pulls the information off the camera – the picture of the eye and information about the horse – and sends it via Internet to the eyeD processor. It stores the iris images and assigns those images a unique 15 alphanumeric number. That number, the eyeD ID, is associated with that horse’s eye, and becomes the horse’s identification number,” he explains.

Breed registries, health professionals, equine facilities, events and shows, racetracks and regulatory administrators for tracking movement of horses across state or international borders rely on dependable means of permanent identification. Now there are some secure, yet simple methods of identification – with advantages over traditional methods such as brands, tattoos, or even microchips.

A new system becoming available to professionals and horse owners is iris scan technology, called eyeD. At present, the iris scan is one of the most accurate, reliable, safe and effective existing identification methods for horses. The iris, the colored portion of the eye, is easily seen and photographed.

David Knupp, who works with Global Animal Management, says a specialized camera is held about 14 inches away from the eye. “It takes a few seconds to take pictures of both eyes. The horse doesn’t have to remain perfectly still because we’re taking a video,” he explains.

“The software goes back through the video, frame by frame, and selects an image best suited for the iris mapping process. It grabs that image, which we call an eyePrint, and uses it for the permanent picture,” Knupp says.

“We do this for both eyes when we enroll a horse in the system. That information is transferred to a computer. You plug the camera into your computer. A piece of client software, called eyeSync, must be installed on your computer. It pulls the information off the camera – the picture of the eye and information about the horse – and sends it via Internet to the eyeD processor. It stores the iris images and assigns those images a unique 15 alphanumeric number. That number, the eyeD ID, is associated with that horse’s eye, and becomes the horse’s identification number,” he explains.

Breed registries, health professionals, equine facilities, events and shows, racetracks and regulatory administrators for tracking movement of horses across state or international borders rely on dependable means of permanent identification. Now there are some secure, yet simple methods of identification – with advantages over traditional methods such as brands, tattoos, or even microchips.

A new system becoming available to professionals and horse owners is iris scan technology, called eyeD. At present, the iris scan is one of the most accurate, reliable, safe and effective existing identification methods for horses. The iris, the colored portion of the eye, is easily seen and photographed.

David Knupp, who works with Global Animal Management, says a specialized camera is held about 14 inches away from the eye. “It takes a few seconds to take pictures of both eyes. The horse doesn’t have to remain perfectly still because we’re taking a video,” he explains.

“The software goes back through the video, frame by frame, and selects an image best suited for the iris mapping process. It grabs that image, which we call an eyePrint, and uses it for the permanent picture,” Knupp says.

“We do this for both eyes when we enroll a horse in the system. That information is transferred to a computer. You plug the camera into your computer. A piece of client software, called eyeSync, must be installed on your computer. It pulls the information off the camera – the picture of the eye and information about the horse – and sends it via Internet to the eyeD processor. It stores the iris images and assigns those images a unique 15 alphanumeric number. That number, the eyeD ID, is associated with that horse’s eye, and becomes the horse’s identification number,” he explains.

editor’s note: to learn more about eyed technology, contact company representative david knupp at 309-948-3423, or visit http://www.eyed.com.

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