Jacobs Livestock and Rodeo is a Montana legend | TSLN.com

Jacobs Livestock and Rodeo is a Montana legend

Bill Brewster

Photo by Bill BrewsterLane Wright of Roy, MT, marked a 74 to win the saddle bronc title at the Townsend Fair Rodeo on July 31.

Over 55 years ago, Bill Jacobs of Great Falls, MT, started the Jacobs Livestock and Rodeo company history with colts and calves and yearling steers so that kids from eight to ten years of age could start their rodeo careers, according to Don Jacobs of Great Falls, the founder of Jacobs Livestock and Rodeos. Bill was Don’s brother and his love of rodeo and generosity helped to make the company possible.

Today Jacobs Livestock and Rodeo is managed by Dick Lyman, Don Jacob’s step-son but Don and his wife Teeter still provide moral support and input that comes from their years of staging some of Montana’s best NRA rodeos. This busy rodeo company stages 10 rodeos each summer plus two bull rides.

The extended family of children, grand children and close associates were busy July 29-Aug. 1 at the Broadwater County Fair and Rodeo in Townsend, MT. The events included a children’s rodeo day, the two-day sanctioned NRA rodeo and Sunday rodeo for Broadwater county residents. The season continued Aug. 6-7 in Bozeman and then traveled to Twin Bridges before finishing up in Gardiner.

“Our whole family wants to be involved,” Dick Lyman said during the rodeo. “They all pitch in and help and some don’t even get paid.”

The Jacobs Rodeo team travels with between 14 and 22 members of the extended family to various rodeos each weekend.

Lyman said his girls, Lacey, Fanci, Tiffany and Britney and their husbands are part of this extended team that makes the rodeo successful. Family members work in many capacities from timers to rodeo secretaries to announcers and behind the chutes.

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“We all participate in rodeo and this ranching way of life,” Lyman said.

Today the family has access to exceptional bucking horses because they are raised on the ranch north of Great Falls. Along with the brood mare band, the ranch uses two studs that carry the “want to buck” genetics.

“When you get 20 percent to buck, you are doing good,” Lyman noted. Between 15 and 25 head of rough stock from the Jacobs string go the NRA Finals in Billings each year.

Over 55 years ago, Bill Jacobs of Great Falls, MT, started the Jacobs Livestock and Rodeo company history with colts and calves and yearling steers so that kids from eight to ten years of age could start their rodeo careers, according to Don Jacobs of Great Falls, the founder of Jacobs Livestock and Rodeos. Bill was Don’s brother and his love of rodeo and generosity helped to make the company possible.

Today Jacobs Livestock and Rodeo is managed by Dick Lyman, Don Jacob’s step-son but Don and his wife Teeter still provide moral support and input that comes from their years of staging some of Montana’s best NRA rodeos. This busy rodeo company stages 10 rodeos each summer plus two bull rides.

The extended family of children, grand children and close associates were busy July 29-Aug. 1 at the Broadwater County Fair and Rodeo in Townsend, MT. The events included a children’s rodeo day, the two-day sanctioned NRA rodeo and Sunday rodeo for Broadwater county residents. The season continued Aug. 6-7 in Bozeman and then traveled to Twin Bridges before finishing up in Gardiner.

“Our whole family wants to be involved,” Dick Lyman said during the rodeo. “They all pitch in and help and some don’t even get paid.”

The Jacobs Rodeo team travels with between 14 and 22 members of the extended family to various rodeos each weekend.

Lyman said his girls, Lacey, Fanci, Tiffany and Britney and their husbands are part of this extended team that makes the rodeo successful. Family members work in many capacities from timers to rodeo secretaries to announcers and behind the chutes.

“We all participate in rodeo and this ranching way of life,” Lyman said.

Today the family has access to exceptional bucking horses because they are raised on the ranch north of Great Falls. Along with the brood mare band, the ranch uses two studs that carry the “want to buck” genetics.

“When you get 20 percent to buck, you are doing good,” Lyman noted. Between 15 and 25 head of rough stock from the Jacobs string go the NRA Finals in Billings each year.

Over 55 years ago, Bill Jacobs of Great Falls, MT, started the Jacobs Livestock and Rodeo company history with colts and calves and yearling steers so that kids from eight to ten years of age could start their rodeo careers, according to Don Jacobs of Great Falls, the founder of Jacobs Livestock and Rodeos. Bill was Don’s brother and his love of rodeo and generosity helped to make the company possible.

Today Jacobs Livestock and Rodeo is managed by Dick Lyman, Don Jacob’s step-son but Don and his wife Teeter still provide moral support and input that comes from their years of staging some of Montana’s best NRA rodeos. This busy rodeo company stages 10 rodeos each summer plus two bull rides.

The extended family of children, grand children and close associates were busy July 29-Aug. 1 at the Broadwater County Fair and Rodeo in Townsend, MT. The events included a children’s rodeo day, the two-day sanctioned NRA rodeo and Sunday rodeo for Broadwater county residents. The season continued Aug. 6-7 in Bozeman and then traveled to Twin Bridges before finishing up in Gardiner.

“Our whole family wants to be involved,” Dick Lyman said during the rodeo. “They all pitch in and help and some don’t even get paid.”

The Jacobs Rodeo team travels with between 14 and 22 members of the extended family to various rodeos each weekend.

Lyman said his girls, Lacey, Fanci, Tiffany and Britney and their husbands are part of this extended team that makes the rodeo successful. Family members work in many capacities from timers to rodeo secretaries to announcers and behind the chutes.

“We all participate in rodeo and this ranching way of life,” Lyman said.

Today the family has access to exceptional bucking horses because they are raised on the ranch north of Great Falls. Along with the brood mare band, the ranch uses two studs that carry the “want to buck” genetics.

“When you get 20 percent to buck, you are doing good,” Lyman noted. Between 15 and 25 head of rough stock from the Jacobs string go the NRA Finals in Billings each year.

Over 55 years ago, Bill Jacobs of Great Falls, MT, started the Jacobs Livestock and Rodeo company history with colts and calves and yearling steers so that kids from eight to ten years of age could start their rodeo careers, according to Don Jacobs of Great Falls, the founder of Jacobs Livestock and Rodeos. Bill was Don’s brother and his love of rodeo and generosity helped to make the company possible.

Today Jacobs Livestock and Rodeo is managed by Dick Lyman, Don Jacob’s step-son but Don and his wife Teeter still provide moral support and input that comes from their years of staging some of Montana’s best NRA rodeos. This busy rodeo company stages 10 rodeos each summer plus two bull rides.

The extended family of children, grand children and close associates were busy July 29-Aug. 1 at the Broadwater County Fair and Rodeo in Townsend, MT. The events included a children’s rodeo day, the two-day sanctioned NRA rodeo and Sunday rodeo for Broadwater county residents. The season continued Aug. 6-7 in Bozeman and then traveled to Twin Bridges before finishing up in Gardiner.

“Our whole family wants to be involved,” Dick Lyman said during the rodeo. “They all pitch in and help and some don’t even get paid.”

The Jacobs Rodeo team travels with between 14 and 22 members of the extended family to various rodeos each weekend.

Lyman said his girls, Lacey, Fanci, Tiffany and Britney and their husbands are part of this extended team that makes the rodeo successful. Family members work in many capacities from timers to rodeo secretaries to announcers and behind the chutes.

“We all participate in rodeo and this ranching way of life,” Lyman said.

Today the family has access to exceptional bucking horses because they are raised on the ranch north of Great Falls. Along with the brood mare band, the ranch uses two studs that carry the “want to buck” genetics.

“When you get 20 percent to buck, you are doing good,” Lyman noted. Between 15 and 25 head of rough stock from the Jacobs string go the NRA Finals in Billings each year.

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