Justice spotlights competition | TSLN.com

Justice spotlights competition

Chris Clayton

DTN file photosDuring the next few months, workshops are being held by the Department of Justice and USDA to look at competition in agriculture, including in the seed trade business, livestock and poultry areas.

OMAHA (DTN) – Ray Gaesser will be one of the few lucky farmers who knows he will be able to share his thoughts on agricultural competition.

Gaesser, a soybean and corn farmer from Corning, Iowa, will have a literal seat at the table Friday at a community college campus in Ankeny, Iowa. He’s attending the first of five national meetings between now and December that are being held by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and Department of Justice to examine the state of competition for farmers.

To prepare for the workshops, DOJ and USDA asked for public comments and got more than 15,000 responses, so many that the Department of Justice has been unable to process and post all of them. In a statement describing the meeting, the DOJ said the workshops “will examine whether changes in the marketplace, including increased consolidation and vertical integration, have generated efficiencies, or whether they have led to increases in monopoly or monopsony power.”

The challenge Friday may be honing in on one substantive theme. The day’s agenda includes 31 listed speakers or panelists. Eight public officials start off the event, followed by a panel of five farmers from different sectors in the morning. The afternoon agenda includes panels on competition in the seed industry, trends in market power and agriculture enforcement. That’s all supposed to happen before the floor is opened for general public comments.

So many people want to speak about so many issues that several groups organized a separate meeting Thursday night in Ankeny that has more than 200 people registered to attend.

“The way the public workshops are set up now is nothing more than political theater,” said David Goodner, a community organizer with Iowa Citizens for Community Improvement. “They are giving the public one hour for public comments, at the end of the day, after hours of posturing by politicians and public interests. We think the public comments need to be put at the beginning of the day. There are only a handful of independent family farmers who will be part of the discussion.”

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OMAHA (DTN) – Ray Gaesser will be one of the few lucky farmers who knows he will be able to share his thoughts on agricultural competition.

Gaesser, a soybean and corn farmer from Corning, Iowa, will have a literal seat at the table Friday at a community college campus in Ankeny, Iowa. He’s attending the first of five national meetings between now and December that are being held by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and Department of Justice to examine the state of competition for farmers.

To prepare for the workshops, DOJ and USDA asked for public comments and got more than 15,000 responses, so many that the Department of Justice has been unable to process and post all of them. In a statement describing the meeting, the DOJ said the workshops “will examine whether changes in the marketplace, including increased consolidation and vertical integration, have generated efficiencies, or whether they have led to increases in monopoly or monopsony power.”

The challenge Friday may be honing in on one substantive theme. The day’s agenda includes 31 listed speakers or panelists. Eight public officials start off the event, followed by a panel of five farmers from different sectors in the morning. The afternoon agenda includes panels on competition in the seed industry, trends in market power and agriculture enforcement. That’s all supposed to happen before the floor is opened for general public comments.

So many people want to speak about so many issues that several groups organized a separate meeting Thursday night in Ankeny that has more than 200 people registered to attend.

“The way the public workshops are set up now is nothing more than political theater,” said David Goodner, a community organizer with Iowa Citizens for Community Improvement. “They are giving the public one hour for public comments, at the end of the day, after hours of posturing by politicians and public interests. We think the public comments need to be put at the beginning of the day. There are only a handful of independent family farmers who will be part of the discussion.”

OMAHA (DTN) – Ray Gaesser will be one of the few lucky farmers who knows he will be able to share his thoughts on agricultural competition.

Gaesser, a soybean and corn farmer from Corning, Iowa, will have a literal seat at the table Friday at a community college campus in Ankeny, Iowa. He’s attending the first of five national meetings between now and December that are being held by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and Department of Justice to examine the state of competition for farmers.

To prepare for the workshops, DOJ and USDA asked for public comments and got more than 15,000 responses, so many that the Department of Justice has been unable to process and post all of them. In a statement describing the meeting, the DOJ said the workshops “will examine whether changes in the marketplace, including increased consolidation and vertical integration, have generated efficiencies, or whether they have led to increases in monopoly or monopsony power.”

The challenge Friday may be honing in on one substantive theme. The day’s agenda includes 31 listed speakers or panelists. Eight public officials start off the event, followed by a panel of five farmers from different sectors in the morning. The afternoon agenda includes panels on competition in the seed industry, trends in market power and agriculture enforcement. That’s all supposed to happen before the floor is opened for general public comments.

So many people want to speak about so many issues that several groups organized a separate meeting Thursday night in Ankeny that has more than 200 people registered to attend.

“The way the public workshops are set up now is nothing more than political theater,” said David Goodner, a community organizer with Iowa Citizens for Community Improvement. “They are giving the public one hour for public comments, at the end of the day, after hours of posturing by politicians and public interests. We think the public comments need to be put at the beginning of the day. There are only a handful of independent family farmers who will be part of the discussion.”

OMAHA (DTN) – Ray Gaesser will be one of the few lucky farmers who knows he will be able to share his thoughts on agricultural competition.

Gaesser, a soybean and corn farmer from Corning, Iowa, will have a literal seat at the table Friday at a community college campus in Ankeny, Iowa. He’s attending the first of five national meetings between now and December that are being held by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and Department of Justice to examine the state of competition for farmers.

To prepare for the workshops, DOJ and USDA asked for public comments and got more than 15,000 responses, so many that the Department of Justice has been unable to process and post all of them. In a statement describing the meeting, the DOJ said the workshops “will examine whether changes in the marketplace, including increased consolidation and vertical integration, have generated efficiencies, or whether they have led to increases in monopoly or monopsony power.”

The challenge Friday may be honing in on one substantive theme. The day’s agenda includes 31 listed speakers or panelists. Eight public officials start off the event, followed by a panel of five farmers from different sectors in the morning. The afternoon agenda includes panels on competition in the seed industry, trends in market power and agriculture enforcement. That’s all supposed to happen before the floor is opened for general public comments.

So many people want to speak about so many issues that several groups organized a separate meeting Thursday night in Ankeny that has more than 200 people registered to attend.

“The way the public workshops are set up now is nothing more than political theater,” said David Goodner, a community organizer with Iowa Citizens for Community Improvement. “They are giving the public one hour for public comments, at the end of the day, after hours of posturing by politicians and public interests. We think the public comments need to be put at the beginning of the day. There are only a handful of independent family farmers who will be part of the discussion.”

OMAHA (DTN) – Ray Gaesser will be one of the few lucky farmers who knows he will be able to share his thoughts on agricultural competition.

Gaesser, a soybean and corn farmer from Corning, Iowa, will have a literal seat at the table Friday at a community college campus in Ankeny, Iowa. He’s attending the first of five national meetings between now and December that are being held by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and Department of Justice to examine the state of competition for farmers.

To prepare for the workshops, DOJ and USDA asked for public comments and got more than 15,000 responses, so many that the Department of Justice has been unable to process and post all of them. In a statement describing the meeting, the DOJ said the workshops “will examine whether changes in the marketplace, including increased consolidation and vertical integration, have generated efficiencies, or whether they have led to increases in monopoly or monopsony power.”

The challenge Friday may be honing in on one substantive theme. The day’s agenda includes 31 listed speakers or panelists. Eight public officials start off the event, followed by a panel of five farmers from different sectors in the morning. The afternoon agenda includes panels on competition in the seed industry, trends in market power and agriculture enforcement. That’s all supposed to happen before the floor is opened for general public comments.

So many people want to speak about so many issues that several groups organized a separate meeting Thursday night in Ankeny that has more than 200 people registered to attend.

“The way the public workshops are set up now is nothing more than political theater,” said David Goodner, a community organizer with Iowa Citizens for Community Improvement. “They are giving the public one hour for public comments, at the end of the day, after hours of posturing by politicians and public interests. We think the public comments need to be put at the beginning of the day. There are only a handful of independent family farmers who will be part of the discussion.”

OMAHA (DTN) – Ray Gaesser will be one of the few lucky farmers who knows he will be able to share his thoughts on agricultural competition.

Gaesser, a soybean and corn farmer from Corning, Iowa, will have a literal seat at the table Friday at a community college campus in Ankeny, Iowa. He’s attending the first of five national meetings between now and December that are being held by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and Department of Justice to examine the state of competition for farmers.

To prepare for the workshops, DOJ and USDA asked for public comments and got more than 15,000 responses, so many that the Department of Justice has been unable to process and post all of them. In a statement describing the meeting, the DOJ said the workshops “will examine whether changes in the marketplace, including increased consolidation and vertical integration, have generated efficiencies, or whether they have led to increases in monopoly or monopsony power.”

The challenge Friday may be honing in on one substantive theme. The day’s agenda includes 31 listed speakers or panelists. Eight public officials start off the event, followed by a panel of five farmers from different sectors in the morning. The afternoon agenda includes panels on competition in the seed industry, trends in market power and agriculture enforcement. That’s all supposed to happen before the floor is opened for general public comments.

So many people want to speak about so many issues that several groups organized a separate meeting Thursday night in Ankeny that has more than 200 people registered to attend.

“The way the public workshops are set up now is nothing more than political theater,” said David Goodner, a community organizer with Iowa Citizens for Community Improvement. “They are giving the public one hour for public comments, at the end of the day, after hours of posturing by politicians and public interests. We think the public comments need to be put at the beginning of the day. There are only a handful of independent family farmers who will be part of the discussion.”

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