Keys to comprehensive parasite control in cattle | TSLN.com

Keys to comprehensive parasite control in cattle

Photo by Jan Swan WoodOne way to break the life cycle of parasites - drastically reducing their numbers and impact - is to rotate pastures.

With the snow melting and pastures greening, producers’ thoughts turn to new life, fresh air, enjoying the outdoors and parasite control. While it may not fit with the idyllic concept of spring, having a plan for controlling the creepy-crawlies can contribute to a more idyllic figure in the pocketbook next fall.

Ken Olson, extension beef specialist with South Dakota State University, says every producer should have a plan in place for parasite control. “Producers should have a plan for what they would do under routine conditions, but be prepared to adjust based on what actual conditions are like,” he says. Generally the better a growing season, the more parasite problems producers will encounter. Warm, wet springs provide better conditions for both internal and external parasites. Drought conditions tend to reduce parasite populations, Olson says.

Though Mother Nature is beyond producers’ control, there’s plenty they can do to minimize animals’ exposure to parasites and the parasites’ impact on the animals. That impact goes far beyond the annoyance and lost eating time. “Lost performance is one of the biggest problems. Whether internal or external, parasites are going to steal nutrients from the animal,” Olson says. In addition to stealing nutrients, parasites can prevent animals from consuming more nutrients because of the annoyance factor. “Part of the problem with parasites like flies is harassment. They cause the animals to bunch up and hide in trees to get away from the flies,” Olson says.

“When cows are bunched up fighting flies they aren’t spread out eating. That can affect milk production, which can affect the calves’ rate of gain,” adds Dr. Bill Baker, a veterinarian from Hyannis, NE.

Parasites also are responsible for transmitting disease, which can have a further economic impact. Flies transmit pinkeye and many insects can move disease from one animal to another, Olson says. Trichomoniasis, which is a sexually transmitted parasite that causes reproductive dysfunction, is getting to be a more pervasive problem.

“In one way or another, often in multiple ways, parasites lead to performance declines and become economically important,” Olson says.

Recommended Stories For You

With the snow melting and pastures greening, producers’ thoughts turn to new life, fresh air, enjoying the outdoors and parasite control. While it may not fit with the idyllic concept of spring, having a plan for controlling the creepy-crawlies can contribute to a more idyllic figure in the pocketbook next fall.

Ken Olson, extension beef specialist with South Dakota State University, says every producer should have a plan in place for parasite control. “Producers should have a plan for what they would do under routine conditions, but be prepared to adjust based on what actual conditions are like,” he says. Generally the better a growing season, the more parasite problems producers will encounter. Warm, wet springs provide better conditions for both internal and external parasites. Drought conditions tend to reduce parasite populations, Olson says.

Though Mother Nature is beyond producers’ control, there’s plenty they can do to minimize animals’ exposure to parasites and the parasites’ impact on the animals. That impact goes far beyond the annoyance and lost eating time. “Lost performance is one of the biggest problems. Whether internal or external, parasites are going to steal nutrients from the animal,” Olson says. In addition to stealing nutrients, parasites can prevent animals from consuming more nutrients because of the annoyance factor. “Part of the problem with parasites like flies is harassment. They cause the animals to bunch up and hide in trees to get away from the flies,” Olson says.

“When cows are bunched up fighting flies they aren’t spread out eating. That can affect milk production, which can affect the calves’ rate of gain,” adds Dr. Bill Baker, a veterinarian from Hyannis, NE.

Parasites also are responsible for transmitting disease, which can have a further economic impact. Flies transmit pinkeye and many insects can move disease from one animal to another, Olson says. Trichomoniasis, which is a sexually transmitted parasite that causes reproductive dysfunction, is getting to be a more pervasive problem.

“In one way or another, often in multiple ways, parasites lead to performance declines and become economically important,” Olson says.

With the snow melting and pastures greening, producers’ thoughts turn to new life, fresh air, enjoying the outdoors and parasite control. While it may not fit with the idyllic concept of spring, having a plan for controlling the creepy-crawlies can contribute to a more idyllic figure in the pocketbook next fall.

Ken Olson, extension beef specialist with South Dakota State University, says every producer should have a plan in place for parasite control. “Producers should have a plan for what they would do under routine conditions, but be prepared to adjust based on what actual conditions are like,” he says. Generally the better a growing season, the more parasite problems producers will encounter. Warm, wet springs provide better conditions for both internal and external parasites. Drought conditions tend to reduce parasite populations, Olson says.

Though Mother Nature is beyond producers’ control, there’s plenty they can do to minimize animals’ exposure to parasites and the parasites’ impact on the animals. That impact goes far beyond the annoyance and lost eating time. “Lost performance is one of the biggest problems. Whether internal or external, parasites are going to steal nutrients from the animal,” Olson says. In addition to stealing nutrients, parasites can prevent animals from consuming more nutrients because of the annoyance factor. “Part of the problem with parasites like flies is harassment. They cause the animals to bunch up and hide in trees to get away from the flies,” Olson says.

“When cows are bunched up fighting flies they aren’t spread out eating. That can affect milk production, which can affect the calves’ rate of gain,” adds Dr. Bill Baker, a veterinarian from Hyannis, NE.

Parasites also are responsible for transmitting disease, which can have a further economic impact. Flies transmit pinkeye and many insects can move disease from one animal to another, Olson says. Trichomoniasis, which is a sexually transmitted parasite that causes reproductive dysfunction, is getting to be a more pervasive problem.

“In one way or another, often in multiple ways, parasites lead to performance declines and become economically important,” Olson says.

With the snow melting and pastures greening, producers’ thoughts turn to new life, fresh air, enjoying the outdoors and parasite control. While it may not fit with the idyllic concept of spring, having a plan for controlling the creepy-crawlies can contribute to a more idyllic figure in the pocketbook next fall.

Ken Olson, extension beef specialist with South Dakota State University, says every producer should have a plan in place for parasite control. “Producers should have a plan for what they would do under routine conditions, but be prepared to adjust based on what actual conditions are like,” he says. Generally the better a growing season, the more parasite problems producers will encounter. Warm, wet springs provide better conditions for both internal and external parasites. Drought conditions tend to reduce parasite populations, Olson says.

Though Mother Nature is beyond producers’ control, there’s plenty they can do to minimize animals’ exposure to parasites and the parasites’ impact on the animals. That impact goes far beyond the annoyance and lost eating time. “Lost performance is one of the biggest problems. Whether internal or external, parasites are going to steal nutrients from the animal,” Olson says. In addition to stealing nutrients, parasites can prevent animals from consuming more nutrients because of the annoyance factor. “Part of the problem with parasites like flies is harassment. They cause the animals to bunch up and hide in trees to get away from the flies,” Olson says.

“When cows are bunched up fighting flies they aren’t spread out eating. That can affect milk production, which can affect the calves’ rate of gain,” adds Dr. Bill Baker, a veterinarian from Hyannis, NE.

Parasites also are responsible for transmitting disease, which can have a further economic impact. Flies transmit pinkeye and many insects can move disease from one animal to another, Olson says. Trichomoniasis, which is a sexually transmitted parasite that causes reproductive dysfunction, is getting to be a more pervasive problem.

“In one way or another, often in multiple ways, parasites lead to performance declines and become economically important,” Olson says.

Go back to article