Kourtney Hauge wins Corn Palace Stampede Rodeo crown | TSLN.com

Kourtney Hauge wins Corn Palace Stampede Rodeo crown

Courtesy photoKourtney Hauge is adamant that rodeo and rodeo queen contests instill important skills within youth, one of which is patriotism.

Kourtney Hauge of White Lake, SD, was crowned the 2011 Corn Palace Stampede Rodeo Queen during the opening night of the Corn Palace Stampede Rodeo on July 24 in Mitchell, SD. Hauge returned to earn the honor after winning the Corn Palace Stampede Rodeo Junior Queen title in 2006.

Hauge is the daughter of Martin and Jody Hauge, and is a sophomore biology and public relations major at Black Hills State University. Upon graduation, she plans to attend medical school to obtain her Doctorate degree in anesthesiology. Although her studies are geared towards the medical profession, her heart remains in agriculture as she continues participating in rodeo and queen contests. She is a past member of the South Dakota High School Rodeo Association (SDHSRA) and a current member of the American Quarter Horse Association, American Paint Horse Association and South Dakota 4-H.

“I began competing in rodeo in 2005 when I first joined 4-H, and in 2006, I won my first junior title,” said Hauge. “With this title came an addiction for rodeo queening; I was hooked! South Dakota’s love for rodeo has made representing our state with various rodeo queen titles a truly unforgettable experience. It truly has been the ride of lifetime. Rodeo and rodeo queen contests have become a very important aspect of my life because they have allowed me to take the Western life a step further to promote not only the state I live in, but also the important values that rodeo and rodeo queen contests instill in young people.”

Hauge has had great success in her rodeo career thus far. Since 2006, she has held 11 rodeo queen titles and qualified for the National High School Finals Rodeo in Farmington, NM, twice. From 2008-2010, she served two consecutive terms as the SDHSRA Rodeo Queen, and she placed seventh at the finals in 2009. Most recently, Hauge completed her Junior Miss Rodeo South Dakota title.

“Rodeo and rodeo queen contests continually instill important skills within our youth including: hard work, determination, sportsmanship, public speaking, interview skills, value of practicing for something you love, patriotism and the love of animals,” she added. “Rodeo teaches youth that with hard work and dedication to a sport you love you can achieve anything. Through these programs I have learned to set my goals high and if you work hard you can achieve them, and this is exactly what I plan to do. My future goal is to represent South Dakota as Miss Rodeo South Dakota and later represent this great nation as Miss Rodeo America. It has been a goal of mine since I began competing in rodeo queen contests and a goal I intend to meet.”

These goals are certainly within reach for the talented Hauge as evidenced by the riveting speech she presented during the Corn Palace Stampede Rodeo Queen contest. The theme for the speeches was “unsung heroes,” and Hauge effortlessly brought this message home in her talk.

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“The message in my speech was about the unsung heroes behind the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association (PRCA),” she explained. “Individuals must understand that it’s not always about the gold buckle-winning cowboys, renowned stock contractors and rodeo personnel, but the unsung heroes behind the sport. These unsung heroes are the moms of bull riders who have watched their sons grow up on the back of a bull; wives of stock contractors who spend so many days on the road contracting stock, while at the same time, being the backbone of their family at home; and the families of bull fighters who spend all year traveling the nation, giving up their lives to support their husband and dad in his career as a bull fighter whose job is to save the lives of the PRCA cowboys. These individuals dedicate their lives to their families and truly are the unsung heroes of the PRCA.”

Hauge has big goals while holding her Corn Palace Stampede Rodeo title.

“This rodeo represents not only the cowboys and cowgirls of the PRCA, but patriotism, family, and the western way of life within South Dakota,” said Hauge. “As the 2011 Corn Palace Stampede Queen, it’s my goal to continue to educate those unaware about South Dakota’s number one sport of rodeo. I hope to educate consumers about the importance of agriculture in the state. Whether it’s the beef that they eat at supper, the rodeo they are watching for entertainment, or the ethanol they use in their vehicles, agriculture plays an important role in our daily lives.”

Kourtney Hauge of White Lake, SD, was crowned the 2011 Corn Palace Stampede Rodeo Queen during the opening night of the Corn Palace Stampede Rodeo on July 24 in Mitchell, SD. Hauge returned to earn the honor after winning the Corn Palace Stampede Rodeo Junior Queen title in 2006.

Hauge is the daughter of Martin and Jody Hauge, and is a sophomore biology and public relations major at Black Hills State University. Upon graduation, she plans to attend medical school to obtain her Doctorate degree in anesthesiology. Although her studies are geared towards the medical profession, her heart remains in agriculture as she continues participating in rodeo and queen contests. She is a past member of the South Dakota High School Rodeo Association (SDHSRA) and a current member of the American Quarter Horse Association, American Paint Horse Association and South Dakota 4-H.

“I began competing in rodeo in 2005 when I first joined 4-H, and in 2006, I won my first junior title,” said Hauge. “With this title came an addiction for rodeo queening; I was hooked! South Dakota’s love for rodeo has made representing our state with various rodeo queen titles a truly unforgettable experience. It truly has been the ride of lifetime. Rodeo and rodeo queen contests have become a very important aspect of my life because they have allowed me to take the Western life a step further to promote not only the state I live in, but also the important values that rodeo and rodeo queen contests instill in young people.”

Hauge has had great success in her rodeo career thus far. Since 2006, she has held 11 rodeo queen titles and qualified for the National High School Finals Rodeo in Farmington, NM, twice. From 2008-2010, she served two consecutive terms as the SDHSRA Rodeo Queen, and she placed seventh at the finals in 2009. Most recently, Hauge completed her Junior Miss Rodeo South Dakota title.

“Rodeo and rodeo queen contests continually instill important skills within our youth including: hard work, determination, sportsmanship, public speaking, interview skills, value of practicing for something you love, patriotism and the love of animals,” she added. “Rodeo teaches youth that with hard work and dedication to a sport you love you can achieve anything. Through these programs I have learned to set my goals high and if you work hard you can achieve them, and this is exactly what I plan to do. My future goal is to represent South Dakota as Miss Rodeo South Dakota and later represent this great nation as Miss Rodeo America. It has been a goal of mine since I began competing in rodeo queen contests and a goal I intend to meet.”

These goals are certainly within reach for the talented Hauge as evidenced by the riveting speech she presented during the Corn Palace Stampede Rodeo Queen contest. The theme for the speeches was “unsung heroes,” and Hauge effortlessly brought this message home in her talk.

“The message in my speech was about the unsung heroes behind the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association (PRCA),” she explained. “Individuals must understand that it’s not always about the gold buckle-winning cowboys, renowned stock contractors and rodeo personnel, but the unsung heroes behind the sport. These unsung heroes are the moms of bull riders who have watched their sons grow up on the back of a bull; wives of stock contractors who spend so many days on the road contracting stock, while at the same time, being the backbone of their family at home; and the families of bull fighters who spend all year traveling the nation, giving up their lives to support their husband and dad in his career as a bull fighter whose job is to save the lives of the PRCA cowboys. These individuals dedicate their lives to their families and truly are the unsung heroes of the PRCA.”

Hauge has big goals while holding her Corn Palace Stampede Rodeo title.

“This rodeo represents not only the cowboys and cowgirls of the PRCA, but patriotism, family, and the western way of life within South Dakota,” said Hauge. “As the 2011 Corn Palace Stampede Queen, it’s my goal to continue to educate those unaware about South Dakota’s number one sport of rodeo. I hope to educate consumers about the importance of agriculture in the state. Whether it’s the beef that they eat at supper, the rodeo they are watching for entertainment, or the ethanol they use in their vehicles, agriculture plays an important role in our daily lives.”

Kourtney Hauge of White Lake, SD, was crowned the 2011 Corn Palace Stampede Rodeo Queen during the opening night of the Corn Palace Stampede Rodeo on July 24 in Mitchell, SD. Hauge returned to earn the honor after winning the Corn Palace Stampede Rodeo Junior Queen title in 2006.

Hauge is the daughter of Martin and Jody Hauge, and is a sophomore biology and public relations major at Black Hills State University. Upon graduation, she plans to attend medical school to obtain her Doctorate degree in anesthesiology. Although her studies are geared towards the medical profession, her heart remains in agriculture as she continues participating in rodeo and queen contests. She is a past member of the South Dakota High School Rodeo Association (SDHSRA) and a current member of the American Quarter Horse Association, American Paint Horse Association and South Dakota 4-H.

“I began competing in rodeo in 2005 when I first joined 4-H, and in 2006, I won my first junior title,” said Hauge. “With this title came an addiction for rodeo queening; I was hooked! South Dakota’s love for rodeo has made representing our state with various rodeo queen titles a truly unforgettable experience. It truly has been the ride of lifetime. Rodeo and rodeo queen contests have become a very important aspect of my life because they have allowed me to take the Western life a step further to promote not only the state I live in, but also the important values that rodeo and rodeo queen contests instill in young people.”

Hauge has had great success in her rodeo career thus far. Since 2006, she has held 11 rodeo queen titles and qualified for the National High School Finals Rodeo in Farmington, NM, twice. From 2008-2010, she served two consecutive terms as the SDHSRA Rodeo Queen, and she placed seventh at the finals in 2009. Most recently, Hauge completed her Junior Miss Rodeo South Dakota title.

“Rodeo and rodeo queen contests continually instill important skills within our youth including: hard work, determination, sportsmanship, public speaking, interview skills, value of practicing for something you love, patriotism and the love of animals,” she added. “Rodeo teaches youth that with hard work and dedication to a sport you love you can achieve anything. Through these programs I have learned to set my goals high and if you work hard you can achieve them, and this is exactly what I plan to do. My future goal is to represent South Dakota as Miss Rodeo South Dakota and later represent this great nation as Miss Rodeo America. It has been a goal of mine since I began competing in rodeo queen contests and a goal I intend to meet.”

These goals are certainly within reach for the talented Hauge as evidenced by the riveting speech she presented during the Corn Palace Stampede Rodeo Queen contest. The theme for the speeches was “unsung heroes,” and Hauge effortlessly brought this message home in her talk.

“The message in my speech was about the unsung heroes behind the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association (PRCA),” she explained. “Individuals must understand that it’s not always about the gold buckle-winning cowboys, renowned stock contractors and rodeo personnel, but the unsung heroes behind the sport. These unsung heroes are the moms of bull riders who have watched their sons grow up on the back of a bull; wives of stock contractors who spend so many days on the road contracting stock, while at the same time, being the backbone of their family at home; and the families of bull fighters who spend all year traveling the nation, giving up their lives to support their husband and dad in his career as a bull fighter whose job is to save the lives of the PRCA cowboys. These individuals dedicate their lives to their families and truly are the unsung heroes of the PRCA.”

Hauge has big goals while holding her Corn Palace Stampede Rodeo title.

“This rodeo represents not only the cowboys and cowgirls of the PRCA, but patriotism, family, and the western way of life within South Dakota,” said Hauge. “As the 2011 Corn Palace Stampede Queen, it’s my goal to continue to educate those unaware about South Dakota’s number one sport of rodeo. I hope to educate consumers about the importance of agriculture in the state. Whether it’s the beef that they eat at supper, the rodeo they are watching for entertainment, or the ethanol they use in their vehicles, agriculture plays an important role in our daily lives.”

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