Letter to the Editor: Unwanted horses | TSLN.com

Letter to the Editor: Unwanted horses

I have read more articles than usual in papers around the Midwest of neglected and starving animals.

One of the reasons is because of the harsher winter of 2010 and 2011.

I hate to hear of any animal starving or freezing, whether its cats, dogs, cattle, horses, buffalo, or even elephants for that matter.

I’ve read three stories in the last two weeks about so called “neglected horses.”

A few years ago, these horses were bringing $300 to $400. An outstanding broodmare, worth $5,000 in her prime, is now worth almost nothing at the end of her term.

Today ,in some cases, it doesn’t pay to haul healthy horses to town.

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While I do not condone starving horses, simple economics says its hard to put $100 worth of feed in a $25 horse.

You may ask, “Why raise them if they are not worth anything?” For many years you could make a nice income raising horses. That has changed dramatically in the last few years and now people who raise horses have trouble disposing of them – especially if they own a large number of them.

And, well-intentioned people are mostly to blame. These so-called “horse lovers,” animal-rights groups, movie stars, and even a few country music singers have successfully closed all the horse proccessing facilities in the U.S.

If a horse-raiser can’t send a horse to a humane-processing plant, how are they to get rid of the animals past their prime?

Not all horses are family pets which spend their retirement in a green lush pasture or standing by a hay feeder full of hay.

Unfortunately, many of these horses, because there is no proper disposal method, end up starving, neglected and maybe even bred with more unfed colts to add to the problem.

While they are walking around patting each other on the back, do-gooders have allowed horses to suffer that would not have had to if processing-plants were open.

Simple fact: More horses are suffering today than before because horse processing-plants are closed.

I have read more articles than usual in papers around the Midwest of neglected and starving animals.

One of the reasons is because of the harsher winter of 2010 and 2011.

I hate to hear of any animal starving or freezing, whether its cats, dogs, cattle, horses, buffalo, or even elephants for that matter.

I’ve read three stories in the last two weeks about so called “neglected horses.”

A few years ago, these horses were bringing $300 to $400. An outstanding broodmare, worth $5,000 in her prime, is now worth almost nothing at the end of her term.

Today ,in some cases, it doesn’t pay to haul healthy horses to town.

While I do not condone starving horses, simple economics says its hard to put $100 worth of feed in a $25 horse.

You may ask, “Why raise them if they are not worth anything?” For many years you could make a nice income raising horses. That has changed dramatically in the last few years and now people who raise horses have trouble disposing of them – especially if they own a large number of them.

And, well-intentioned people are mostly to blame. These so-called “horse lovers,” animal-rights groups, movie stars, and even a few country music singers have successfully closed all the horse proccessing facilities in the U.S.

If a horse-raiser can’t send a horse to a humane-processing plant, how are they to get rid of the animals past their prime?

Not all horses are family pets which spend their retirement in a green lush pasture or standing by a hay feeder full of hay.

Unfortunately, many of these horses, because there is no proper disposal method, end up starving, neglected and maybe even bred with more unfed colts to add to the problem.

While they are walking around patting each other on the back, do-gooders have allowed horses to suffer that would not have had to if processing-plants were open.

Simple fact: More horses are suffering today than before because horse processing-plants are closed.

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