Mexico eliminates duties on U.S. beef | TSLN.com

Mexico eliminates duties on U.S. beef

Mexico announced this week it was dropping anti-dumping duties that have been imposed on U.S. beef imports for the past 10 years. The duties were put in place after allegations by Mexican producers that U.S. beef was being “dumped” – or sold for less than the cost of production – in Mexico. The duties could have been renewed this year on a request for review by an interested party. A request for a review was made, and later withdrawn, by Mexico’s biggest association of cattlemen.

“In recent years, interested parties in Mexico have concluded that the duties offer them no advantage,” said Chad Russell, regional director for the U.S. Meat Export Federation. “Even before the withdrawal motion (by the Mexican cattlemen’s group) other Mexican industry associations had remained neutral or actually favored eliminating the duties. This really shows how far the U.S. industry has come in developing a strong trade relationship with Mexico.”

The duties ranged from 2-29 cents per pound. According to the office of the U.S. Trade Representative, the duties caused losses of $100 – $500 million annually, because of reduced shipments and altered trade flows. The U.S. became a net cattle and beef exporter to Mexico in 1996, and today Mexico represents an annual U.S. beef export market worth $910 million.

Mexico announced this week it was dropping anti-dumping duties that have been imposed on U.S. beef imports for the past 10 years. The duties were put in place after allegations by Mexican producers that U.S. beef was being “dumped” – or sold for less than the cost of production – in Mexico. The duties could have been renewed this year on a request for review by an interested party. A request for a review was made, and later withdrawn, by Mexico’s biggest association of cattlemen.

“In recent years, interested parties in Mexico have concluded that the duties offer them no advantage,” said Chad Russell, regional director for the U.S. Meat Export Federation. “Even before the withdrawal motion (by the Mexican cattlemen’s group) other Mexican industry associations had remained neutral or actually favored eliminating the duties. This really shows how far the U.S. industry has come in developing a strong trade relationship with Mexico.”

The duties ranged from 2-29 cents per pound. According to the office of the U.S. Trade Representative, the duties caused losses of $100 – $500 million annually, because of reduced shipments and altered trade flows. The U.S. became a net cattle and beef exporter to Mexico in 1996, and today Mexico represents an annual U.S. beef export market worth $910 million.

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