Miles City to Deadwood trail ride relives history | TSLN.com

Miles City to Deadwood trail ride relives history

Alaina Mousel, Editor

The 260-mile trek between Miles City, MT and Deadwood, SD, has only been traveled once in its entirety in the last century. That journey, which took place Aug. 19 through Sept. 4, 2010, was the result organizers who wanted to relive history and preserve the Western way of life.

According to Michael Greslin, a building contractor who lives southeast of Sturgis, SD and co-organizer, the 16-day-long event drew an incredible amount of interest. However, when it came time to hit the trail, “We probably had 80-100 people who rode; of those 40 probably traveled the whole thing,” Greslin said.

It drew mostly retired folks who could dedicate the time to the lengthy trail, but also children, too. “Some school-aged kids came with grandparents and left (the trail) when school started,” he said.

If you’re unfamiliar with the Miles City to Deadwood trail ride, you’re not alone. 2010 marked the first year the trail was traveled in over one hundred years, Greslin said.

“I’m fairly confident this will never happen again on this trail because of the easements, land owner agreements, insurance and Bureau of Land Management (BLM) agreements in Montana, Wyoming and South Dakota,” Greslin said. He explained that though BLM land is public land, organized events require permits, which adds to the rigamorle of organizing a trail ride.

Despite those challenges, Greslin said the BLM and state land offices were good to work with. “They helped us out as much as they could, and apologized for the process, but there are rules they must follow for an event like this.”

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The 260-mile trek between Miles City, MT and Deadwood, SD, has only been traveled once in its entirety in the last century. That journey, which took place Aug. 19 through Sept. 4, 2010, was the result organizers who wanted to relive history and preserve the Western way of life.

According to Michael Greslin, a building contractor who lives southeast of Sturgis, SD and co-organizer, the 16-day-long event drew an incredible amount of interest. However, when it came time to hit the trail, “We probably had 80-100 people who rode; of those 40 probably traveled the whole thing,” Greslin said.

It drew mostly retired folks who could dedicate the time to the lengthy trail, but also children, too. “Some school-aged kids came with grandparents and left (the trail) when school started,” he said.

If you’re unfamiliar with the Miles City to Deadwood trail ride, you’re not alone. 2010 marked the first year the trail was traveled in over one hundred years, Greslin said.

“I’m fairly confident this will never happen again on this trail because of the easements, land owner agreements, insurance and Bureau of Land Management (BLM) agreements in Montana, Wyoming and South Dakota,” Greslin said. He explained that though BLM land is public land, organized events require permits, which adds to the rigamorle of organizing a trail ride.

Despite those challenges, Greslin said the BLM and state land offices were good to work with. “They helped us out as much as they could, and apologized for the process, but there are rules they must follow for an event like this.”

The 260-mile trek between Miles City, MT and Deadwood, SD, has only been traveled once in its entirety in the last century. That journey, which took place Aug. 19 through Sept. 4, 2010, was the result organizers who wanted to relive history and preserve the Western way of life.

According to Michael Greslin, a building contractor who lives southeast of Sturgis, SD and co-organizer, the 16-day-long event drew an incredible amount of interest. However, when it came time to hit the trail, “We probably had 80-100 people who rode; of those 40 probably traveled the whole thing,” Greslin said.

It drew mostly retired folks who could dedicate the time to the lengthy trail, but also children, too. “Some school-aged kids came with grandparents and left (the trail) when school started,” he said.

If you’re unfamiliar with the Miles City to Deadwood trail ride, you’re not alone. 2010 marked the first year the trail was traveled in over one hundred years, Greslin said.

“I’m fairly confident this will never happen again on this trail because of the easements, land owner agreements, insurance and Bureau of Land Management (BLM) agreements in Montana, Wyoming and South Dakota,” Greslin said. He explained that though BLM land is public land, organized events require permits, which adds to the rigamorle of organizing a trail ride.

Despite those challenges, Greslin said the BLM and state land offices were good to work with. “They helped us out as much as they could, and apologized for the process, but there are rules they must follow for an event like this.”

The 260-mile trek between Miles City, MT and Deadwood, SD, has only been traveled once in its entirety in the last century. That journey, which took place Aug. 19 through Sept. 4, 2010, was the result organizers who wanted to relive history and preserve the Western way of life.

According to Michael Greslin, a building contractor who lives southeast of Sturgis, SD and co-organizer, the 16-day-long event drew an incredible amount of interest. However, when it came time to hit the trail, “We probably had 80-100 people who rode; of those 40 probably traveled the whole thing,” Greslin said.

It drew mostly retired folks who could dedicate the time to the lengthy trail, but also children, too. “Some school-aged kids came with grandparents and left (the trail) when school started,” he said.

If you’re unfamiliar with the Miles City to Deadwood trail ride, you’re not alone. 2010 marked the first year the trail was traveled in over one hundred years, Greslin said.

“I’m fairly confident this will never happen again on this trail because of the easements, land owner agreements, insurance and Bureau of Land Management (BLM) agreements in Montana, Wyoming and South Dakota,” Greslin said. He explained that though BLM land is public land, organized events require permits, which adds to the rigamorle of organizing a trail ride.

Despite those challenges, Greslin said the BLM and state land offices were good to work with. “They helped us out as much as they could, and apologized for the process, but there are rules they must follow for an event like this.”

The 260-mile trek between Miles City, MT and Deadwood, SD, has only been traveled once in its entirety in the last century. That journey, which took place Aug. 19 through Sept. 4, 2010, was the result organizers who wanted to relive history and preserve the Western way of life.

According to Michael Greslin, a building contractor who lives southeast of Sturgis, SD and co-organizer, the 16-day-long event drew an incredible amount of interest. However, when it came time to hit the trail, “We probably had 80-100 people who rode; of those 40 probably traveled the whole thing,” Greslin said.

It drew mostly retired folks who could dedicate the time to the lengthy trail, but also children, too. “Some school-aged kids came with grandparents and left (the trail) when school started,” he said.

If you’re unfamiliar with the Miles City to Deadwood trail ride, you’re not alone. 2010 marked the first year the trail was traveled in over one hundred years, Greslin said.

“I’m fairly confident this will never happen again on this trail because of the easements, land owner agreements, insurance and Bureau of Land Management (BLM) agreements in Montana, Wyoming and South Dakota,” Greslin said. He explained that though BLM land is public land, organized events require permits, which adds to the rigamorle of organizing a trail ride.

Despite those challenges, Greslin said the BLM and state land offices were good to work with. “They helped us out as much as they could, and apologized for the process, but there are rules they must follow for an event like this.”

The 260-mile trek between Miles City, MT and Deadwood, SD, has only been traveled once in its entirety in the last century. That journey, which took place Aug. 19 through Sept. 4, 2010, was the result organizers who wanted to relive history and preserve the Western way of life.

According to Michael Greslin, a building contractor who lives southeast of Sturgis, SD and co-organizer, the 16-day-long event drew an incredible amount of interest. However, when it came time to hit the trail, “We probably had 80-100 people who rode; of those 40 probably traveled the whole thing,” Greslin said.

It drew mostly retired folks who could dedicate the time to the lengthy trail, but also children, too. “Some school-aged kids came with grandparents and left (the trail) when school started,” he said.

If you’re unfamiliar with the Miles City to Deadwood trail ride, you’re not alone. 2010 marked the first year the trail was traveled in over one hundred years, Greslin said.

“I’m fairly confident this will never happen again on this trail because of the easements, land owner agreements, insurance and Bureau of Land Management (BLM) agreements in Montana, Wyoming and South Dakota,” Greslin said. He explained that though BLM land is public land, organized events require permits, which adds to the rigamorle of organizing a trail ride.

Despite those challenges, Greslin said the BLM and state land offices were good to work with. “They helped us out as much as they could, and apologized for the process, but there are rules they must follow for an event like this.”

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